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    Hi all, I'm really into economics, particularly economics of the welfare state, labour markets and things that relate to society.
    Ive tried an economics degree and absolutely hated it - all that maths!!! urghh!

    Anyway, I've applied again to a different uni (i'm sure you can guess which) to do either Social Policy or Political Economy.
    I narrowly missed out on PE last year, and did economics at the other uni through clearing.

    I've read that Political Economy is much less mathematical than economics, is this true?
    Part of me wants to do Social Policy because it sounds my sort of thing, I've flicked through the text books and it seems like it's perfect for me....
    trouble is, I'm really worried about prestige, career prospects etc.
    is social policy one of those mickey mouse subjects like leisure and tourism a-level?

    would I have better prospects doing PE rather than SP?
    PE does interest me, almost as much as SP, but ive got an unconditional offer for SP, havent heard about PE.

    The entry requirements for SP are much lower than PE.... this is off putting. Should it put me off? Is there a reason for this?

    Thanks, Jr

    oh and I havent got a clue what I want to do after uni. Either civil service, journalism or something with banks.
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    (Original post by jrdavid)
    Hi all, I'm really into economics, particularly economics of the welfare state, labour markets and things that relate to society.
    Ive tried an economics degree and absolutely hated it - all that maths!!! urghh!.
    Well it is a case of costs and benefits...

    (Original post by jrdavid)
    Anyway, I've applied again to a different uni (i'm sure you can guess which) to do either Social Policy or Political Economy.
    I narrowly missed out on PE last year, and did economics at the other uni through clearing.
    What uni is it you don't like economics at?
    and where have you applied for SP and PE at?
    (No I can't guess!)

    (Original post by jrdavid)
    I've read that Political Economy is much less mathematical than economics, is this true?
    At a research level it is no less mathematical than any other area of economics. I have seen research presentations on PE so I have experience!
    But what fare the uni you have applied to service up at undergraduate level hard to guess.

    (Original post by jrdavid)
    Part of me wants to do Social Policy because it sounds my sort of thing, I've flicked through the text books and it seems like it's perfect for me....
    Great
    (Original post by jrdavid)
    trouble is, I'm really worried about prestige, career prospects etc.
    is social policy one of those mickey mouse subjects like leisure and tourism a-level?
    i) Ask your target uni.
    ii) look on unistats.com
    iii) But if they are less mathematical than economics then there will be a cost in terms of career prospects.

    (Original post by jrdavid)
    would I have better prospects doing PE rather than SP?
    PE does interest me, almost as much as SP, but ive got an unconditional offer for SP, havent heard about PE.

    The entry requirements for SP are much lower than PE.... this is off putting. Should it put me off?
    yes.

    (Original post by jrdavid)
    Is there a reason for this?
    yes: supply and demand.

    (Original post by jrdavid)
    Thanks, Jr

    oh and I havent got a clue what I want to do after uni. Either civil service, journalism or something with banks.
    Well economics would be better imo for civil service and banking.
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    (Original post by Paulwhy)

    What uni is it you don't like economics at?
    and where have you applied for SP and PE at?
    (No I can't guess!)
    Was at Coventry. Trying for Birmingham.
    (Original post by Paulwhy)
    But what fare the uni you have applied to service up at undergraduate level hard to guess.
    -en anglais?


    (Original post by paulwhy)
    Well economics would be better imo for civil service and banking.
    - yeah i see your point. Thanks
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    (Original post by jrdavid)
    I've read that Political Economy is much less mathematical than economics, is this true?
    At a research level it is no less mathematical than any other area of economics. I have seen research presentations on PE so I have experience!
    But what the content of the undergraduate course you have applied to is like is hard to guess. However given that it is Birmingham that is a good sign.
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    (Original post by Paulwhy)
    At a research level it is no less mathematical than any other area of economics. I have seen research presentations on PE so I have experience!
    But what the content of the undergraduate course you have applied to is like is hard to guess. However given that it is Birmingham that is a good sign.

    So by that do you mean that at post graduate it is likely to be just as mathematical as economics, but under graduate level, which is taught rather than researched, it is going to be less mathematical, in your opinion?

    ofcourse i appreciate that things change from uni to uni...

    the fact that PE is offered from the politics department rather than the economics department is some what reassuring.
    I want to do an essay based degree, where i can write about economics. Not a quantative one where I'm being assessed on my ability to calculate elasticities, arcs, slopes or anything like that.... or data analysis...

    economics at birmingham asks for maths ability but PE doesn't.

    well I'll go for PE rather than Social Policy, if i get the offer.

    thanks, Paulwhy!
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    Political Economy will probably be fine for what you are looking at. Just browsing through the Birmingham website, if all the modules you are taking are from within the School of Politics then it will be low on the quantitative side and it is likely to be an essay based degree. Might be worth emailing them to check before you sign up for it.

    Political Economy is my main interest in Politics, however the more advanced you get the more you delve into economics. I was speaking to one of my old lecturers a couple of weeks ago about political economy in general and he said that if you study it at postgraduate level especially at the leading institutions, its basically taught by economists, even if they are residing in Politics departments.

    You will be studying the works of contemporary political philosophers like Rawls, Nozick, Dworkin, Cohen,Hayek, Singer etc, and of course the economists Keynes, Friedman and earlier ones Smith, Ricardo, Marx etc. A good basic intro which is written simply for undergrads is "Whats Wrong With Liberalism" by Maureen Ramsay, it summarises the arguments the different political philosophers are making and you can use the page references in that to go back to the primary texts and work out what the most important chapters are.
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    Well Political economy has more economics in it than social policy. In fact social policy at the LSE barely has any direct relationship between economics and can do the whole 3yrs without studying any economics.

    I understand what you mean about prestige but its more about where you study it rather than what you study and social policy is much more harder than people give credit for. I am fortunate to study it at the LSE which has the best social policy department in the country and is a very well established department that has been there since the LSE was established
 
 
 
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