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    I can't believe Birmingham get away with saying you need 8A*s at GCSE because at my school 7A*s was the absolute best you could hope for because they took away most of the GCSE's and replaced them with GNVQ's which at distinction level are only equivalent A's.

    I would definitely recommend trying to get some work as an HCA. However I would start applying now because it took 9 months from applying before I got my first proper shift as an HCA. The trust I applied to only run interviews when they have enough applicants so it was nearly 3 months before I got an interview. They then had to clear my CRB before I could book the induction course and then it was another 4 months before I actually took the induction course... I had my first proper shift about a month after that.

    Working as an HCA gave me lots to talk about at interview, the doctors often let me follow them around while they were doing their rounds and I have had opportunities to witness some really inspirational things - stuff they seemed to love at interview.

    I am fully intending to continue working as a bank HCA during my holidays because I genuinely believe it is amazing experience for communication and care - I also find the job really enjoyable (could never work in a shop now). I haven’t been working that long, but I have already seen a big improvement in how I communicate with people. As an HCA you are in a far better position to actually get to know people and take an active role in their care than both nurses and doctors.

    My experience of doctors so far is that blink and you will miss them. The nurses on the other hand spend the vast majority of their time at the nurses’ station filling out paperwork and only venture out if they have a drugs trolley. Often it falls to the HCA's to pick up the pieces when someone has been refused surgery 3 days in a row or the doctor dropped an emotional bombshell before evaporating in a puff of smoke or the patient just doesn’t really understand what is going on, but is obviously quite concerned.
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    (Original post by True.Enigma)
    I can't believe Birmingham get away with saying you need 8A*s at GCSE because at my school 7A*s was the absolute best you could hope for because they took away most of the GCSE's and replaced them with GNVQ's which at distinction level are only equivalent A's.

    I would definitely recommend trying to get some work as an HCA. However I would start applying now because it took 9 months from applying before I got my first proper shift as an HCA. The trust I applied to only run interviews when they have enough applicants so it was nearly 3 months before I got an interview. They then had to clear my CRB before I could book the induction course and then it was another 4 months before I actually took the induction course... I had my first proper shift about a month after that.

    Working as an HCA gave me lots to talk about at interview, the doctors often let me follow them around while they were doing their rounds and I have had opportunities to witness some really inspirational things - stuff they seemed to love at interview.

    I am fully intending to continue working as a bank HCA during my holidays because I genuinely believe it is amazing experience for communication and care - I also find the job really enjoyable (could never work in a shop now). I haven’t been working that long, but I have already seen a big improvement in how I communicate with people. As an HCA you are in a far better position to actually get to know people and take an active role in their care than both nurses and doctors.

    My experience of doctors so far is that blink and you will miss them. The nurses on the other hand spend the vast majority of their time at the nurses’ station filling out paperwork and only venture out if they have a drugs trolley. Often it falls to the HCA's to pick up the pieces when someone has been refused surgery 3 days in a row or the doctor dropped an emotional bombshell before evaporating in a puff of smoke or the patient just doesn’t really understand what is going on, but is obviously quite concerned
    .
    I bet they'd love you at interview if you said that. I can see it now...

    "Yerr, nurses just fill out paperworks and pull the drugs trolly around. Doctors? What doctors? Har har, they're never around eithah, I swear they try to hide from patients or sumut or somefing. It's basically us HCAs that have the most active role in the care of patients."
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    (Original post by RollerBall)
    It's basically us HCAs that have the most active role in the care of patients.
    Actually I think the doctors would tend to agree, we are often asked to give our opinions on how the patient has been while in our care.

    When you may only get to see someone for 10 minutes at the most it is extremely helpful to know in advance how the patient will respond to you. This isn't complicated, but a judgement on how confused they are or if they are hard of hearing can make a big difference and this is not easy to asses in 10 minutes when you have a specific job to do. Patients can intentionally and unintentionally mislead, don't always appreciate what information might be relevant and often struggle to verbalise their needs.

    I'm not trying to say nurses don't get out and see patients, they most certainly do, but in terms of total contact time I would still say the HCAs are the first ones to flag up problems or assist with a patients general well-being. I could not work without the assistance of trained nurses and I think there is a great mutual respect for our shared responsibilities.

    I did bring up some of my impressions of doctors as an HCA, but more in terms of what I felt was good practice and how important it is that doctors recognise their limitations and make use of all the resources available to them in the extended nursing team. I only mentioned this briefly though as my main focus was on the skills I felt I developed not my impression of medicine in general.
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    Hi!

    Decided to make this thread because those ******* medics decide to turn the other thread into a chat one.

    I have some questions, so I am currently in my A2 year and have applied to study Biomedical Sciences for this year, now I'm thinking of taking the year out to not study BSc Biomedical sciences, instead I opted for the option of going straight for med. Initially I was thinking of going to study GEP med which is a bit risky. Would I be considered a re applicant if I do this ? I heard from a few people that I would be taken as a reapplicant if I didn't apply to med straight after my A2's/Sixth form. Would this in any way put me at disadvantage ?

    How do I go about getting references and signing up for UCAS because my college did all this for me last year when applying. People who took a year out did your college teachers do it again for you ? If not where do you go ?

    Do I need to have a UCAS account before taking the UKCAT test ?

    Thank you.
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    PS Helper
    No you do not need a UCAS Number when taking the test, you can give it to them later.

    Your school should be able to submit it for you, and write a reference for you. and you would not be considered as a re-applicant.

    My referee did my reference this year from my school, and they submitted it via my school.

    Provided you start doing productive things in your gap year, E.G Become employed as a HCA. You would be at an advantage rather than disadvantage.
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    I think you're only considered a resit candidate if you actually do exams in a third year.
    A year out could be beneficial to your application, you could spend more time in a medical setting or even go travelling to see healthcare abroad if possible?
    If you're not sure, you could firm your biomedical science offer and see what you get in August and then decide whether or not to do grad depending on grades.
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    any ideas what do in a gap year before reapplying to medicine?
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    Chill. Volunteer. Get more experience. Work harder on your PS for next year. Take up a new hobby. Get hench.
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    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki/Medicine_Gap_Years
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    HCA it up.
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    My friend worked in a GUM clinic for her forced gap year.
    Now she's in her second year at Sheffield and loving it
    Good luck!
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    get as much relevant work experience as possible? I've heard that's really, really important for medicine.

    but also do something you'll enjoy, like travel
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    HCA fo sure make sure to imporve your ps I knew someone who just posted the old one with 2 extra paragraphs enjoy the year it could be a blessing in disguise
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    (Original post by Hits'27)
    any ideas what do in a gap year before reapplying to medicine?
    My friend was in this situation. He did an extra a level, got some work experience, did some travelling, then got an offer from Cambridge.
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    Relax for a while, then intern somewhere, get some medicine-related work experience to make you stand out on your application, because you want to really stand out from the crowd of the average gap-year students. Polish your med school admission test scores if you want, and maybe travel or do something for charity? That's what I would do.
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    work experience.
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    I've done loadss of work experience, from voluntary working in a care home for 6 months weekly to my local gp every saturday. I even went to a hospital in Boston, USA to do a summer placement where i got to do lots of shadowing etc.
    Do i really need to do more?
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    Just out of interest how would one go about getting a job as a HCA, I've tried the normal jobs searches but they all ask for nurses/ band 2 + HCA's . Was thinking of doing this part time whilst at uni.
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    HCA? Health Care Assistant?
    I'm trying to apply to those, but would they really take an A-Level student with no NVQ's in Care or anything?
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    i got a job in a special needs school
 
 
 
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