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NHS Chlamydia Valentine's Cards watch

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    I agree that heath-related advertising campaigns are going too far.

    I've certainly no issue with condoms being posted to young people - I think that's a good thing. Teenagers WILL have sex. They do. Unfortunately, not all will go to the effort of protecting themselves, so anything that actively helps is brilliant, but the campaigns are beginning to stereotype too much and to push too far. I can see why they're causing anger amongst teenagers.

    That said, the latest 'wear your seatbelt' campaign is, to me, even worse. If you've heard it whilst in the car, listening to your radio, you'll know what I mean. A morbid-sounding woman (there's a similar ad on television) describes in detail how the main artery to your heart will snap if you crash at 30mph, and how you'll die a painful death, essentially. This is bad enough for me driving in to work at 7am with three other people in my car - we all sit awkwardly through it, with our seatbelts on, day after day, with me in full knowledge that I'm the one in control of the car. Gulp. Worse, though, is that this advert is also on regularly in the 3.30-4.00pm slot - when children are being picked up from school in cars - way to scare them!

    I really don't think shock tactics work in advertising - they're patronising/concerning to anyone with half a brain, and ignored by anyone without.
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    (Original post by Fatal_Microbes)
    Yes, in disease terms 7% is alot, my point was more that if we were doing a job or were sitting a test and we were correct 7% of the time we'd be doing a pretty bad job.
    I guess the sarcasm was kind of lost on this topic.

    However I do believe that personally posting these cards is a waste, considering there are much more effective ways to reach people. If it comes through the post people are more likely to regard it as span, whereas myspace/facebook campaigns, tv ads etc are a lot more effective.
    You forget about those who perhaps don't watch TV (or don't pay attention to the adverts) or don't use myspace/facebook. I'd say they're targetting some places where the lack of television/internet is more common, or where STIs are more common, rather than just the entire country. People HAVE to pick up the post, they may ignore it, but they're just as likely to if it's on facebook, at least this way the government know it's probably going to be noticed (the OP noticed it, but didn't point out the many chlamydia adverts on the tv/internet did they not? )
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    not as good as this

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    (Original post by Joluk)
    So i opened my mail today, and received a great big red valentines card... from the NHS.

    "Roses are Red, Violets are Blue, 1 in 14 have Chlamydia, don't let it be you"

    Seems like every 18-24 y/o in my London borough (Croydon) was sent one. Now i appreciate that they want to raise awareness of issues like these, but am i the only one who think they've kind of crossed some kind of line here? I don't ever want to receive a valentines card where the subject isn't valentines related, especially not 'You probably have a sexually transmitted infection'. Am i the only one who thinks the NHS have just gone a bit too far? There was a case up north where they sent out free condoms to 18-24 year olds, should a public funded body such as this be promoting sex among teenagers. Have as much sex as you want as long as you wear a condom seems to be the message from the NHS at the moment, is this really the right thing to do?
    Promoting sex amongst 18-24 year olds? Thats at minimum 2 years above legal
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    tbh i dont really want my tax ££ spending on adverts that tell me what to do.
    if i want to smoke, i shall, and if i want to eat myself to death i shall do that also. stupid nanny state labour
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    Nationalised healthcare being shoved down our throats. :rolleyes:

    Perfect... I'm sure this is what Aneurin Bevan envisaged for his 'great NHS'.
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    (Original post by DJkG.1)
    Nationalised healthcare being shoved down our throats. :rolleyes:
    This isn't nationalised healthcare; it's public healthcare. You get this sort of thing everywhere, even in more privatised systems like the US
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    (Original post by Joluk)
    So i opened my mail today, and received a great big red valentines card... from the NHS.

    "Roses are Red, Violets are Blue, 1 in 14 have Chlamydia, don't let it be you"

    Seems like every 18-24 y/o in my London borough (Croydon) was sent one. Now i appreciate that they want to raise awareness of issues like these, but am i the only one who think they've kind of crossed some kind of line here? I don't ever want to receive a valentines card where the subject isn't valentines related, especially not 'You probably have a sexually transmitted infection'. Am i the only one who thinks the NHS have just gone a bit too far? There was a case up north where they sent out free condoms to 18-24 year olds, should a public funded body such as this be promoting sex among teenagers. Have as much sex as you want as long as you wear a condom seems to be the message from the NHS at the moment, is this really the right thing to do?

    What a catch phrase...! I dont think it would get the desired response.. :p:
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    aw now EVERYONE gets a card.... even the single people <3
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    Well i got a free chlamydia test through the post by nhs
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    I think it's great... You'd be shocked how many people would have unprotected sex if they didn't have all of these reminders!!
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    A greetings card can't solve anything.

    This was a huge waste of money.
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    We were given a tenner to do our test south ken health authority ftw
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    Would people not go, 'OOOOOOOH, someone likes me :awesome:', and then feel terribly disappointed?
    Or does the envelope have 'NHS' written all over it to avoid that? If it doesn't, I think it's a bit cruel to get people's hopes up and then tell them about STDs. Particularly if they don't get much action and the idea of what's needed to catch an STD rubs in the fact that they don't get it...

    The concept is fairly good, but I think sending out cards is a waste of resources. Posters on the same theme would have probably got just as much attention without being so invasive.
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    Since I turned 16, I have had around 6 cards/letters/pamphlets telling me to have a chlamydia test. I am now 18 and if I get one more I will scream. They came into our college and encouraged us to pee in a cup, for God's sake.

    I wouldn't dream of having unprotected sex, and while I understand others might and need to know the dangers, I'm getting sick of having NHS propaganda rammed down my throat.

    Little rant over. =]
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    Perhaps you're forgetting that the majority of people who use TSR (imho) are well educated people who feel they have a knowledge of how STI's can be caught. Many people I know (including myself) have had unprotected sex in the heat of the moment, it doesn't matter how much you know but drink, holidays or passion can take over, and you don't think. Chlamydia might not be fatal, but for our generation it could have devastating effects (it can cause infertility etc, and the sheer fact of having a positive chlamydia test and being positive even if you have been 'good' can knock self-confidence down so low), and it's important people get tested.

    This is perhaps the only way the NHS (i.e govenment) can raise awareness. The test is quick and painless, so what is your problem with having it. MANY STI'S CAN BE CAUGHT WITHOUT UNPROTECTED SEX and if you're responsible enough to have sex (even with a condom) you should be mature and responsible enough to get tested for STI's. End of, stop moaning becuase you are part of the tiny% of people who are educated and sensible enough not to have any sexual contact with someone (anyone can have an STI) who could, perhaps be carrying an sti.

    Don't try and kid yourself, that (the majority of people) at some point in your life you aren't going to have the most sensible sexual contact ever, and that you aren't at risk of catching something. Anyone can get an STI, not just dirty people or ****s, so end the stigma and prejudace, and maybe there could be a chance that more people will be tested for them, and not feel ashamed to even have a test in the first place.
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    I feel kinda disappointed, we only got plain ol' letters in our area! No snazzy card, no kit included, just a letter. What a let down.

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    (Original post by Jessaay!)
    People lie about who they've had sex with, some of your partners may well lie or indeed in the future lie about who they've had sex with. I have chosen a module where I teach sex education and to be honest some of the statistics and anecdotes are actually quite shocking. There are so many people with STIs and so many people who don't understand basics about contraception that it is actually quite scary. Chlamydia is becoming the worst one and it is often asymptomatic, which is why the government are promoting the tests so because there is often no way you can know yourself (and to be fair, I can actually see it working. there are tests available pretty much everywhere and people can just conveniently do it, they even do them in clubs and give away free stuff).

    People also forget STIs aren't only spread through unprotected sex. You can also get some forms of them through touching of genitals or oral sex. The condom can split, and whilst rare, you can get it through the eye.

    If you feel patronised you take these things to heart waaay too much. Feeling as though you are being patronised through simple health promotion and not treated like an adult is quite an immature attitude itself. It's going to help in some way, just because you think it challenges your "maturity" and oh so great "knowledge" about STIs doesn't mean they shouldn't send it just in case.


    This, through and through.

    Anyway, I think people are taking this far too personally. "I feel like I'm being stereotyped!" - of course you are, you have to be. Chlamydia is far more prolific than it should be in this age group, they're going to target all of those included. You might be having protected sex, but plenty of people around you aren't and I'm afraid the NHS aren't going to personally contact you and quiz you on your sexual habits before deciding whether to post their newest campaign to you or not.
    I think the biggest problem seems to be the "It could never happen to me" attitude that people have. It's very hard to avoid, and it happens to all of us with concerns to all types of diseases, infections and so forth. But partners will lie, condoms will split, so on and so forth. Nobody is immune, and 1/14 is actually a ridiculously high statistic for a disease which is so difficult to spot and that can have such unfortunate consequences, particularly for women. Also, I think some people seem to have this kind of "Oh, only sluts get STI's" attitude. Well sure, it's more likely. But you could be unfortunate enough to become infected after your first sexual encounter, or after any given number really. Nobody is immune, it's not a time consuming test, and treatment is a simple dose of antibiotics.
    I think it's good that the NHS are pushing it really, but sadly, I don't know how much luck they have until people's attitudes change. And quite how they'd manage that.. I have no idea.
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    (Original post by oh! such a dastardly plan)
    I wouldn't dream of having unprotected sex, and while I understand others might and need to know the dangers, I'm getting sick of having NHS propaganda rammed down my throat.
    It's hardly being 'rammed down [your] throat'. It's a card, if you don't like it, throw it away (or even better, recycle it!), and although it is propaganda, informing people of the facts surrounding an STI that's affecting quite a large number of the population and disproportionate numbers of 18-24 yr olds can't be bad, surely?

    The fact is that between 50% of males and 70-80% of females with chlamydia don't show symptoms (source), and 65% of the 123,018 chlamydia diagnoses in 2008 were to people in the age group of 18-24 - which is shocking. There are already TV adverts, there are already posters - this is another form of advertising, that doesn't rely on people either a. Having a TV or b. Taking notice of posters.

    (Plus, don't think that you're immune to chlamydia because you always use a condom during sex - it can be spread through genital contact and other types of sex, not just penetrative)

    And I also agree 110% with this:
    (Original post by katiemiranda)
    if you're responsible enough to have sex (even with a condom) you should be mature and responsible enough to get tested for STI's.
    The test is harmless. You pee in a cup. You get results. You find out you're clean, great; you find out you're not, you can get adequate treatment. I don't get why people seem so resilient to it?
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    (Original post by oh! such a dastardly plan)
    Since I turned 16, I have had around 6 cards/letters/pamphlets telling me to have a chlamydia test. I am now 18 and if I get one more I will scream. They came into our college and encouraged us to pee in a cup, for God's sake.

    I wouldn't dream of having unprotected sex, and while I understand others might and need to know the dangers, I'm getting sick of having NHS propaganda rammed down my throat.

    Little rant over. =]
    But would you touch someone else's genitals or have oral sex unprotected? Or even have someone else infected touch you maybe after touching themselves. And just because you wouldn't doesn't mean nobody else your age wouldn't think about it (a lot of people just take the pill or something then forget about condoms, but instead think they're being good by protecting against pregnancy. and I mean a LOT of people when I say that).
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    (Original post by Jessaay!)
    But would you touch someone else's genitals or have oral sex unprotected? Or even have someone else infected touch you maybe after touching themselves. And just because you wouldn't doesn't mean nobody else your age wouldn't think about it (a lot of people just take the pill or something then forget about condoms, but instead think they're being good by protecting against pregnancy. and I mean a LOT of people when I say that).
    I understand completely what you mean, but I think they underestimate how many people know about the dangers of it. There are adverts EVERYWHERE for it, most prominently at peak times when teenagers watch TV. We've got the message. It just seems a waste to add more advertisements to the campaign now, especially as I've chucked each one in the bin so far.

    (Original post by Doodahdoo)
    It's hardly being 'rammed down [your] throat'. It's a card, if you don't like it, throw it away (or even better, recycle it!), and although it is propaganda, informing people of the facts surrounding an STI that's affecting quite a large number of the population and disproportionate numbers of 18-24 yr olds can't be bad, surely?

    The fact is that between 50% of males and 70-80% of females with chlamydia don't show symptoms (source), and 65% of the 123,018 chlamydia diagnoses in 2008 were to people in the age group of 18-24 - which is shocking. There are already TV adverts, there are already posters - this is another form of advertising, that doesn't rely on people either a. Having a TV or b. Taking notice of posters.

    (Plus, don't think that you're immune to chlamydia because you always use a condom during sex - it can be spread through genital contact and other types of sex, not just penetrative)
    I'm not saying it's a terrible idea, but look at what you've just told me. There are already two other different kinds of advertising. A card sent through the post backlogs an already struggling postal service and wastes paper! (I do recycle) It's now almost as if they pressure you into getting the test, which I'm sure is not the NHS that people want.

    And by unprotected sex I meant for everything, I know how you can catch it. =] Once again because of our wonderful NHS. I wouldn't post anything if I didn't know what I was talking about, that would be silly.
 
 
 
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