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Too many people studying the same vocational subjects? Watch

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    There seems to be no shortage of people studying or wanting to study vocational subjects that they will have very little chance of working in after graduation.

    Obvious subjects like media, film, fashion but also others like journalism, retail and forensics. Are these people deluded as to how easy it is to get a job in these fields or do they never think beyond graduation?
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    actually the media is very competative, and the skills in those kind of degrees are useful if you want to work in those fields. Other than written journalism (in which I agree an english degree is better) history and english degrees for example don't teach the skills required. Forensics is another one that is very competative. Retail yeh, I can see your point
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    ^^ I think that's what the OP was saying, that there were too many graduates for the amount of jobs available. A 'vocational' course can still provide lots of transferable skills, look at law as an example. One of the problems is that not enough students are wanting to go in to engineering and such like where they are crying out for graduates.
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    Maybe they're aware of how difficult/competitive such industries are, and have thought ahead, but have chosen such courses anyway?
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    Im doing a degree in nursing and know exactly how tough it will be to get a job and work my way up, but i'm good at what i do and enjoy it- this will show through
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    (Original post by TheOneWho)
    ^^ I think that's what the OP was saying, that there were too many graduates for the amount of jobs available. A 'vocational' course can still provide lots of transferable skills, look at law as an example. One of the problems is that not enough students are wanting to go in to engineering and such like where they are crying out for graduates.
    ah yes. I'm stupid
    well, in response to that I do archaeology (an academic course) and its going to be very difficult for me when I graduate this summer. I shall be surprised if I am employed in a graduate job by this time next year. Having an academic degree doesn't mean jobs are easy to come by. Its alot more about work experience
    I knew my degree was going to cost alot and that archaeology is one of the least well paid graduate jobs, but I chose it anyway
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    (Original post by TheOneWho)
    ^^ I think that's what the OP was saying, that there were too many graduates for the amount of jobs available. A 'vocational' course can still provide lots of transferable skills, look at law as an example. One of the problems is that not enough students are wanting to go in to engineering and such like where they are crying out for graduates.
    LLB law is not a vocational course its an academic one and a very academic one at that. Its the BVC and LPC which are the vocational ones.
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    I don't know why people automatically think that vocational courses are soft options.

    I've got 4 A grades at A level and 14 top GCSEs but I want to go into fashion design, which means I need a fashion degree.

    To do that, I'm now taking a compulsory foundation year at college. I haven't had any UCAS offers yet. Each uni I apply to asks me to provide a mini portfolio or sets me a project. Then I have to take a pile of my best work to a "portfolio viewing", where I might be asked to stay for a formal interview or I might be sent straight home. This is even for universities which people here seem to look down on, like Nottingham Trent, Solent, Manchester Met, etc.

    If I wanted to do an English or History degree at a Russell Group uni I would have been given unconditional offers by now. So tell me which is the soft option?
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    If they're good enough, and they have the determination, work ethic, and persistence needed to get a job in the field they want, then good for them. They will most likely get what they want.

    Of course not all people doing these degrees have these qualities, but these people probably won't be all that bothered when they have to settle for a different career anyway.
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    (Original post by museobsessed)
    ah yes. I'm stupid
    well, in response to that I do archaeology (an academic course) and its going to be very difficult for me when I graduate this summer. I shall be surprised if I am employed in a graduate job by this time next year. Having an academic degree doesn't mean jobs are easy to come by. Its alot more about work experience
    I knew my degree was going to cost alot and that archaeology is one of the least well paid graduate jobs, but I chose it anyway
    One of the other features of archaeology-related jobs is that a number of them are dependent on the state of the building industry. Because changes in the building regulations over the years have led to builders having to dig deeper foundations, whenever they come across something that may be of archaeological interest needs to be examined and assessed by a qualified archaeologist. During a construction boom, it's great guns. But when we're in the situation we're in now, it's not good.
 
 
 
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