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    :woo:
    Hey folks!

    Next year ill be applying to uni through UCAS! yay!

    And I was wondering with my 11 years of violin practice, would i be a priority or in general more considerable?

    I got another batty question :P.
    How hard is it to get in oxbridge? obviously hard...

    but lets say, i have CIE ALevels as following:
    A* maths
    A eng lit
    A phyiscs
    A further maths
    A chinese

    i obviously wont, so dont slit my throat...im just curious

    and can someone tell whether this chinese a level is designed for second language people or first, because im struggling
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    (Original post by mr_lin)
    :woo:
    Hey folks!

    Next year ill be applying to uni through UCAS! yay!

    And I was wondering with my 11 years of violin practice, would i be a priority or in general more considerable?

    I got another batty question :P.
    How hard is it to get in oxbridge? obviously hard...

    but lets say, i have CIE ALevels as following:
    A* maths
    A eng lit
    A phyiscs
    A further maths
    A chinese

    i obviously wont, so dont slit my throat...im just curious

    and can someone tell whether this chinese a level is designed for second language people or first, because im struggling
    Others will not stand a chance.
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    why wouldnt they?
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    Unless you have a Grade 6 7 or 8 certificate in Violin, then it wont count. I played the piano for 10 years before I went to uni and got to Grade 5. No UCAS points for me there
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    Unless you're applying for music 11 years of violin practice won't make you any more desirable for a university. It just shows you're all rounded.
    And it's very hard to get into Oxford and Cambridge.
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    (Original post by mr_lin)

    Hey folks!

    Next year ill be applying to uni through UCAS! yay!

    And I was wondering with my 11 years of violin practice, would i be a priority or in general more considerable?

    I got another batty question :P.
    How hard is it to get in oxbridge? obviously hard...

    but lets say, i have CIE ALevels as following:
    A* maths
    A eng lit
    A phyiscs
    A further maths
    A chinese

    i obviously wont, so dont slit my throat...im just curious

    and can someone tell whether this chinese a level is designed for second language people or first, because im struggling
    Your violin experience won't make any difference at all - at best it will feature as one line in your PS (if that).

    The A level in Chinese will not count as much as your other A levels, assuming it's your mother tongue, and is quite likely to be specifically excluded from any offers that you might get. This leaves you with a best case scenario of A*AAA, with Maths and Further Maths also counting as *slightly* less than, say, Maths and Chemistry. If you are planning to apply for Maths or Physics the Further Maths will be essential, and in the case of Maths you will probably need STEP 1 and/or 2 as well, depending on where you are applying. Check out the relevant subject forums on here for more information about this.

    If you are aiming high, you might want to consider dropping the A level Chinese unless it's very easy for you and/or it might be useful later on in career terms. If it's taking time you don't really have or you don't really need it, distracting yourself from the main task of getting A*AAA by doing an A level that doesn't anything much to your CV is pointless. If you have Oxbridge in mind, three A2s (plus Further Maths if you are applying for Maths or Physics) is all that's required. Extra A levels do not give you an advantage of themselves.
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    (Original post by mr_lin)
    :woo:
    Hey folks!

    Next year ill be applying to uni through UCAS! yay!

    And I was wondering with my 11 years of violin practice, would i be a priority or in general more considerable?

    I got another batty question :P.
    How hard is it to get in oxbridge? obviously hard...

    but lets say, i have CIE ALevels as following:
    A* maths
    A eng lit
    A phyiscs
    A further maths
    A chinese

    i obviously wont, so dont slit my throat...im just curious

    and can someone tell whether this chinese a level is designed for second language people or first, because im struggling
    Despite what others have said, your violin playing will be a major asset in your oxbridge application. A very academically able students won't stand much chance unless they can show that they are a well rounded individual.
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    (Original post by _KilgoreTrout_)
    Others will not stand a chance.
    Agreed. There is a very specific need for violinists, the string groups are short on numbers. Therefore you will receive an unconditional offer without interview.
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    (Original post by _KilgoreTrout_)
    Others will not stand a chance.
    LOl.


    OP Oxbridge is not hard to get into if you are the right candidate. They pick those who are RIGHT for their methods of teaching.

    Though I am sure all those years violining will propel you to the top...
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    (Original post by xarcul)
    Despite what others have said, your violin playing will be a major asset in your oxbridge application. A very academically able students won't stand much chance unless they can show that they are a well rounded individual.
    So is it okay to feel pretty darn special if you can't play an instrument and still got in...?
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    (Original post by xarcul)
    Despite what others have said, your violin playing will be a major asset in your oxbridge application. A very academically able students won't stand much chance unless they can show that they are a well rounded individual.
    No it won't. It's not even likely to be a tie-breaker.

    What Oxbridge are interested in is academic ability, nothing else. They really don't care how 'rounded' someone is - if the admission tutor reckons s/he can teach you something and that you will do well with the teaching methods they use, you'll get in. If they don't think that, you won't. Simple as.
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    (Original post by ipulledhermione)
    So is it okay to feel pretty darn special if you can't play an instrument and still got in...?
    My God they must have made a mistake!
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    (Original post by hypocriticaljap)
    My God they must have made a mistake!



    OP: If in doubt, grow some boobs.
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    (Original post by Minerva)
    No it won't. It's not even likely to be a tie-breaker.

    What Oxbridge are interested in is academic ability, nothing else. They really don't care how 'rounded' someone is - if the admission tutor reckons s/he can teach you something and that you will do well with the teaching methods they use, you'll get in. If they don't think that, you won't. Simple as.
    Nearly everyone who applies to oxbridge are extremely academically able - someone who participates in a wide range of extra-curricular activities as well as being very intelligent will stand a massively greater chance of receiving an offer.
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    (Original post by xarcul)
    Nearly everyone who applies to oxbridge are extremely academically able - someone who participates in a wide range of extra-curricular activities as well as being very intelligent will stand a massively greater chance of receiving an offer.
    No they won't. Not everyone who applies to Oxbridge has the potential they are looking for, even if, to date, they appear to have the track record. High grades and lots of them are not necessarily indicators of potential. And, I'll say it again, they really do not care that much about extra-curriculars (unless, of course you are applying for a choral scholarship, for example), and certainly not to the extent of turning people down because they don't do any.

    Someone with a strong extra-curricular CV might - just might - have a slight edge over another candidate with an equivalent academic record and the same level of potential as assessed at interview. That is probably as good as it gets, at Oxbridge. Durham, now, there I might agree with you, as they are very explicit about looking for people who will join in more generally and 'play' as hard as they work.
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    (Original post by Minerva)
    Your violin experience won't make any difference at all - at best it will feature as one line in your PS (if that).

    The A level in Chinese will not count as much as your other A levels, assuming it's your mother tongue, and is quite likely to be specifically excluded from any offers that you might get. This leaves you with a best case scenario of A*AAA, with Maths and Further Maths also counting as *slightly* less than, say, Maths and Chemistry. If you are planning to apply for Maths or Physics the Further Maths will be essential, and in the case of Maths you will probably need STEP 1 and/or 2 as well, depending on where you are applying. Check out the relevant subject forums on here for more information about this.

    If you are aiming high, you might want to consider dropping the A level Chinese unless it's very easy for you and/or it might be useful later on in career terms. If it's taking time you don't really have or you don't really need it, distracting yourself from the main task of getting A*AAA by doing an A level that doesn't anything much to your CV is pointless. If you have Oxbridge in mind, three A2s (plus Further Maths if you are applying for Maths or Physics) is all that's required. Extra A levels do not give you an advantage of themselves.
    What are you talking about? Further maths is a third alevel and equal to if not slightly better than other subjects. You would only need maths, further maths and physics to do physics. And maths and chemistry aren't worth more than maths and further maths. Have you actually done further maths?
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    (Original post by _KilgoreTrout_)
    What are you talking about? Further maths is a third alevel and equal to if not slightly better than other subjects. You would only need maths, further maths and physics to do physics. And maths and chemistry aren't worth more than maths and further maths. Have you actually done further maths?
    What she's saying is that if you want to do maths, you need further maths, also.

    Minerva knows what she's on about. I wouldn't mess with her.
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    Corr, this thread is getting *****y.
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    (Original post by _KilgoreTrout_)
    What are you talking about? Further maths is a third alevel and equal to if not slightly better than other subjects. You would only need maths, further maths and physics to do physics. And maths and chemistry aren't worth more than maths and further maths. Have you actually done further maths?
    Yes, that is the case - however, this is one of the few instances where your application would be stronger if you had an additional A level that was not Maths related. That is what I meant when I said "....Maths and Further Maths also counting as *slightly* less than, say, Maths and Chemistry...". My remarks did not mean that you couldn't get a good offer for Physics with two Maths and Physics A levels, BUT for unis such as Oxbridge, Imperial, UCL, Warwick etc (which I suspect is what the OP has in mind) a candidate offering 3 A2s including Maths and Further Maths will be at a disadvantage relative to other applicants, many if not most of whom will be offering 3 different A2s plus Further Maths. Incidentally, while I am aware how challenging Further Maths can be, it is not 'slightly better' than other subjects. In particular, it seems that it is not perhaps the most effective preparation for Maths at uni level, given that Cambridge and Warwick both ask for STEP as well, and I also know someone who achieved solid As in both and still found Year 1 undergrad Maths more challenging than s/he expected.

    The important bit here is context. If the OP was applying for English Lit, for example, he would be at a disadvantage because of not having another essay-based subject even if he does end up with A*AAA in the subjects he is doing.

    Whether I've done Further Maths myself is irrelevant, of course. I'm a history type these days, anyway, so some basic statistics is really all I need now
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    (Original post by xarcul)
    Despite what others have said, your violin playing will be a major asset in your oxbridge application. A very academically able students won't stand much chance unless they can show that they are a well rounded individual.

    Holy ****

    You got rejected from Glasgow? but got an offer from Cambridge?

    What the **** were Glasgow thinking?
 
 
 
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