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How Much Would Insurance Cost For Learning Private Practice? watch

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    Hi, I just found out theres something called Private Practice, where a family member or friend can teach you how to drive. Now, I decided to go with my father, the question is, how much will it cost (on a rough basis) to insure a provisinal driver for 1 month? (would it be more then £100?)

    Thanks!
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    My 1.4 peugeot cost me £750 to insure when I had my provisional, I passed my test after 3 months of learning and it only cost me a £25 administration fee when I got my full license, so it might be worth insuring it for a year if you will be driving it afterwards.

    But mine was £750/year in my dads name with me as a named driver, you can work it out but it will be more expensive if you are the main driver and if you pay monthly.
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    (Original post by CJN)
    My 1.4 peugeot cost me £750 to insure when I had my provisional, I passed my test after 3 months of learning and it only cost me a £25 administration fee when I got my full license, so it might be worth insuring it for a year if you will be driving it afterwards.

    But mine was £750/year in my dads name with me as a named driver, you can work it out but it will be more expensive if you are the main driver and if you pay monthly.
    only £750? that sounds to good to be true... What insurance group was the car in? was it under insurance group 5?
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    http://www.collingwoodlearners.co.uk/
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    (Original post by AdamDeacon)
    only £750? that sounds to good to be true... What insurance group was the car in? was it under insurance group 5?
    Its group 4.
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    (Original post by R. Murray)
    http://www.collingwoodlearners.co.uk/
    wowowowow! I just got quoted "£96.50" per month! That is excelent! No need to pay £25 a for 1 hour anymore

    Thanks man, I so love you! <3
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    Examiners don't like people in their own cars, so try to get a dual controlled one to take the test in (just have a couple of official lessons before the test and take the test in an instructor's car).
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    (Original post by michael321)
    Examiners don't like people in their own cars, so try to get a dual controlled one to take the test in (just have a couple of official lessons before the test and take the test in an instructor's car).
    That's such crap and you know it.

    You shouldn't need dual control cars for test - because only the driver should need to control the car. If you need duals, you probably shouldn't be going up for test.

    I sat my test in my own car, as did my sister. There wasn't a problem. You just need to make sure that the car is insured for the purpose of the test and that (if it has been recalled for some reason) it has been checked and any work done.

    http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/Motoring...est/DG_4022543
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    (Original post by michael321)
    Examiners don't like people in their own cars, so try to get a dual controlled one to take the test in (just have a couple of official lessons before the test and take the test in an instructor's car).
    My dad is an ex examiner, unless someone is a moron who shouldn't be taking there test there is no issue, and if they are they fail eitherway.
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    My dad is an ex examiner, unless someone is a moron who shouldn't be taking there test there is no issue, and if they are they fail eitherway.
    I'm not saying they all are. But I think there is a definate bias in some examiners, they don't like single control cars as much (my brother was recently working for the DSA and said at meetings examiners were always campaigning to disallow tests taken in people's own cars) - he took five attempts, despite being a good driver, and passed on the only one where he used an instructor's car. I passed 1st time in an instructor's car. Anecdotal I know, but most of the people I know who've passed first time it's been in a dual control car, I just think examiners can be snobbish if you're in your own car, and not have the "his instructor thinks he's ready" mentality.

    Just my two cents. Not saying it always happens, but I think it does to an extent.
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    (Original post by michael321)
    I'm not saying they all are. But I think there is a definate bias in some examiners, they don't like single control cars as much (my brother was recently working for the DSA and said at meetings examiners were always campaigning to disallow tests taken in their own cars) - he took five attempts, despite being a good driver, and passed on the only one where he used an instructor's car. I passed 1st time in an instructor's car. Anecdotal I know, but most of the people I know who've passed first time it's been in a dual control car, I just think examiners can be snobbish if you're in your own car, and not have the "his instructor thinks he's ready" mentality.

    Just my two cents. Not saying it always happens, but I think it does to an extent.
    Too be fair, not that many do it in their own car? So maybe thats something to do with why most you hear about are in duel control?

    You get idiots in every trade, some examiners are moody *****.
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    (Original post by R. Murray)
    That's such crap and you know it.

    You shouldn't need dual control cars for test - because only the driver should need to control the car. If you need duals, you probably shouldn't be going up for test.

    I sat my test in my own car, as did my sister. There wasn't a problem. You just need to make sure that the car is insured for the purpose of the test and that (if it has been recalled for some reason) it has been checked and any work done.

    http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/Motoring...est/DG_4022543
    But surely you understand that the 60% of people who fail first time should probably be in a vehicle with dual controls.
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    (Original post by PeterR)
    But surely you understand that the 60% of people who fail first time should probably be in a vehicle with dual controls.
    Not really, examiners can still take action in a non dual controlled car, but they have to act earlier. Safety isn't compromised, but it's a poor show for the instructors to be putting people up for test who aren't ready.
 
 
 
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