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    Hey all,

    I'm looking to get into political sciences at Uni, but was just scrolling through several other courses and criminology is something that I've had a mild interest in.

    The course requirements need at least one science. Is maths considered a science? Would it be enough to get me through?
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    The vast majority of the time. It requires the same sort of way of thinking as subjects like chemistry and physics so you will be fine with maths.
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    The science of numbers Most universities consider it to be a science.
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    Yes...applied maths particularly ie. mechanics...
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    ...it's the purest science there is.
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    Depends how you define what a science is, however in most peoples definitions it is a science.
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    (Original post by Manitude)
    ...it's the purest science there is.
    :ditto:

    OP it should be a science in terms of universities as well, if they aren't specific about wanting bio, or chem etc. but best to check with the uni first if you're unsure...
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    As a Mathematics student, I find it a little degrading when people refer to it as a science! Or at least Pure Mathematics anyway.
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    I believe so.
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    (Original post by tazarooni89)
    As a Mathematics student, I find it a little degrading when people refer to it as a science! Or at least Pure Mathematics anyway.
    why?
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    (Original post by renlok)
    why?
    because science uses inductive reasoning, its scientific but not mathematically sound,
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    (Original post by renlok)
    why?
    There's a difference between science and mathematics, that I think is illustrated by the following example:

    Suppose I have a chessboard, with two diagonally opposite corner-squares cut off, so there are only 62 squares. I also have 31 dominoes, and each domino can cover two adjacent squares. Is it possible for me to cover the entire chessboard with these dominoes without breaking any of them in half etc.?

    If I took a scientific approach, I would attempt to cover the entire chessboard with dominoes. If I failed the first time, I'd try again. If I failed the second time, I'd try again. Maybe I'd try 20 different configurations. But if I kept failing, I'd give up, and say "No, it most likely isn't possible". But I'd always have to live with the possibility that one day, someone might succeed and prove me wrong.

    If I took a mathematical approach, I wouldn't need to bother with that. I'd simply note that the two diagonally opposite corner squares must have been the same colour. So now, there's more of one colour on the board than the other colour. A domino must cover one white and one black square, so it would only be possible to cover the entire board if there were equal numbers of each colour. So it's impossible, and I have proved this with 100% certainty, and I can have the utmost confidence that nobody will ever find a way to prove me wrong.


    There is some overlap between the two disciplines, but I wouldn't want to say that (pure) mathematics itself actually falls into the category of the sciences, particularly when there is no "scientific method" involved. In a sense, science requires more "faith" than mathematics does.
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    (Original post by nadamo)
    because science uses inductive reasoning, its scientific but not mathematically sound,
    Well if you take the popperian view of falsifiability then Maths is definitely a science since most of it can be falsified however I know what you mean about inductive reasoning, but not all science uses inductive reasoning.
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    (Original post by tazarooni89)
    There's a difference between science and mathematics, that I think is illustrated by the following example:

    Suppose I have a chessboard, with two diagonally opposite corner-squares cut off, so there are only 62 squares. I also have 31 dominoes, and each domino can cover two adjacent squares. Is it possible for me to cover the entire chessboard with these dominoes without breaking any of them in half etc.?

    If I took a scientific approach, I would attempt to cover the entire chessboard with dominoes. If I failed the first time, I'd try again. If I failed the second time, I'd try again. Maybe I'd try 20 different configurations. But if I kept failing, I'd give up, and say "No, it most likely isn't possible". But I'd always have to live with the possibility that one day, someone might succeed and prove me wrong.

    If I took a mathematical approach, I wouldn't need to bother with that. I'd simply note that the two diagonally opposite corner squares must have been the same colour. So now, there's more of one colour on the board than the other colour. A domino must cover one white and one black square, so it would only be possible to cover the entire board if there were equal numbers of each colour. So it's impossible, and I have proved this with 100% certainty, and I can have the utmost confidence that nobody will ever find a way to prove me wrong.


    There is some overlap between the two disciplines, but I wouldn't want to say that (pure) mathematics itself actually falls into the category of the sciences, particularly when there is no "scientific method" involved. In a sense, science requires more "faith" than mathematics does.
    Read both my responses to this thread.
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    You're asking about subject requirements at a-level rather than what it's considered at university so... tbh... I'd imagine that by "a science" they mean chemistry, physics or biology. No harm in asking them directly though.
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    (Original post by yoyo462001)
    Well if you take the popperian view of falsifiability then Maths is definitely a science since most of it can be falsified
    What if I were to not take Popper's view of falsifiability but the following view:

    Something can only be falsified if it is false.
    Mathematical theorems are (most certainly) not false
    Therefore Mathematical theorems are not falsifiable.

    Scientific theories stand a chance of being false
    Therefore scientific theories may be falsifiable.


    I take your point about it depending on one's definition of a "science" - but for me, in order to call something a true science, it requires use of the scientific method to obtain some knowledge about reality.
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    (Original post by tazarooni89)
    What if I were to not take Popper's view of falsifiability but the following view:

    Something can only be falsified if it is false.
    Mathematical theorems are (most certainly) not false
    Therefore Mathematical theorems are not falsifiable.

    Scientific theories stand a chance of being false
    Therefore scientific theories may be falsifiable.


    I take your point about it depending on one's definition of a "science" - but for me, in order to call something a true science, it requires use of the scientific method to obtain some knowledge about reality.
    grrrr inductive reasoning :p: but i understand what your getting at.
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    Mathematics is the first and foremost science.
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    it seems that many mathematicians themselves can't bear to consider themselves scientists because of their "certainty" in their subject whereas the other sciences have a bit of "faith".

    how i LOL'D. Did you know it was proven by mathematicians around 40-50 years ago (i believe Kurt Godel or someone else) that mathematics is devised on axioms that cannot be proven within it's own rules. therefore if your basic axioms cannot be proven which leads onto to ALL other branches of mathemtics it could be considered your entire subject is based on the much hated "faith". oh and you cannot prove it's axioms using ones from outside the subject as then you'd have to prove them aswell ad infinitum. welcome to the club of "scientists".

    EDIT: the only reason we still believe in it is because there so far have been no contradiction within its axioms so we can assume it to be true (sound similar to some scientists work?)
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    Back to the topic though - as far as universities and A-Level options are concerned, the "Trinity List" considers Maths and Further Maths both to be acceptable science subjects, along with Physics, Chemistry and Biology. I'd guess that other universities consider them to be science subjects as well, but you're probably best off ringing up the university in question and asking.
 
 
 

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