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    Yes it is considered as a science. :yep:
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    (Original post by tazarooni89)
    There's a difference between science and mathematics, that I think is illustrated by the following example:

    Suppose I have a chessboard, with two diagonally opposite corner-squares cut off, so there are only 62 squares. I also have 31 dominoes, and each domino can cover two adjacent squares. Is it possible for me to cover the entire chessboard with these dominoes without breaking any of them in half etc.?

    If I took a scientific approach, I would attempt to cover the entire chessboard with dominoes. If I failed the first time, I'd try again. If I failed the second time, I'd try again. Maybe I'd try 20 different configurations. But if I kept failing, I'd give up, and say "No, it most likely isn't possible". But I'd always have to live with the possibility that one day, someone might succeed and prove me wrong.

    If I took a mathematical approach, I wouldn't need to bother with that. I'd simply note that the two diagonally opposite corner squares must have been the same colour. So now, there's more of one colour on the board than the other colour. A domino must cover one white and one black square, so it would only be possible to cover the entire board if there were equal numbers of each colour. So it's impossible, and I have proved this with 100% certainty, and I can have the utmost confidence that nobody will ever find a way to prove me wrong.


    There is some overlap between the two disciplines, but I wouldn't want to say that (pure) mathematics itself actually falls into the category of the sciences, particularly when there is no "scientific method" involved. In a sense, science requires more "faith" than mathematics does.
    well yes i understand the difference between pure maths and science i was mainly asking why you find it degrading when people say maths is a science.
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    (Original post by tazarooni89)
    I'm not really sure what you're talking about - can you be a bit more specific? What should I search for in Google to find out more? :p:
    lol well there was a great show about it on horizon on the bbc the other day - you might still be able to catch it on Iplayer. the horizon episode is called "to infinity and beyond".
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    (Original post by Fat-Love)
    lol well there was a great show about it on horizon on the bbc the other day - you might still be able to catch it on Iplayer. the horizon episode is called "to infinity and beyond".
    Having just watched the programme now - I'll just point out that this "contradiction" you're referring to isn't actually a contradiction within any Mathematical framework that we actually use.
    Rather, it's a contradiction which arises when we attempt to treat infinity as though it were a real number. What we infer from this is that infinity is not a real number - the set of real numbers has no maximum value.

    It isn't a problem with established Mathematics, which tells us that everything we've worked on for so many years has been "wrong". It's just a way of illustrating "Don't try to treat infinity as a real number, because it isn't a real number. Treating it as a real number will cause you problems".

    For example: A hotel with infinity rooms which is fully booked still has room for more people. Of course, this makes no sense - a fully booked hotel cannot have room for more people.
    What do we learn from this? We learn that a hotel cannot have infinity rooms. (A hotel may only have a real number of rooms)
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    (Original post by tazarooni89)
    For example: A hotel with infinity rooms which is fully booked still has room for more people. Of course, this makes no sense - a fully booked hotel cannot have room for more people.
    What do we learn from this? We learn that a hotel cannot have infinity rooms. (A hotel may only have a real number of rooms)
    Well, no, we learn that a room with infinity rooms cannot be fully booked :p:
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    A formal science,like CS.
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    (Original post by renlok)
    well yes i understand the difference between pure maths and science i was mainly asking why you find it degrading when people say maths is a science.
    Well not degrading as such - maybe that was the wrong word.

    It's probably for the same reason that Rage Against the Machine might find it a bit uncalled for if you referred to them as a "pop group".
 
 
 

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