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    I've just found out the incredible news that I have been awarded funding for my taught MA in History. This is, of course, brilliant - it enables me to undertake an MA whereas previously I didn't think I'd manage to save even the course fee's this year. The funding is enough to cover full fee's plus a maintenance of about 4k on top of that.

    So while this is, of course, top notch, it is far from adequate for any one to survive on. So how do people do it during their Masters?

    I currently work full time right now, and have the possibility of going part-time come September when I start my MA. Realistically, how much can one work during a full time MA? Can they at all? Any tips for surviving financially, if aiming for a distinction?

    Any help or suggestions would be appreciated.

    Cheers
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    Wowser, who knew a simple request for opinion would cause such a clash. So far, despite 12 or so posts, I've actually recieved very little help. I was under the belief that TSR was not like a World of Warcraft forum. Evantej, if you have nothing to say that would prove helpful, it is perhaps best for how people view you, to not say anything at all. I am an adult, and as such 4,000 is a hurrendously small amount of money to live off. I am married, I have bills, I have financial committments, I will be commuting - I am not a 21 year old student eating pot-noodles all year round, to which I assume you are, if you can survive on such a small income. Think next time, before you chip-in, whether it is worth it or not.

    I originally enquired about how people who have read for an MA have coped work wise, what the right balance might be, and any helpful tips they could give. I am almost certain that is not too much of a problem, is it?
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    (Original post by Haloface)
    Yellow.

    I've just found out the incredible news that I have been awarded funding for my taught MA in History. This is, of course, brilliant - it enables me to undertake an MA whereas previously I didn't think I'd manage to save even the course fee's this year. The funding is enough to cover full fee's plus a maintenance of about 4k on top of that.

    So while this is, of course, top notch, it is far from adequate for any one to survive on. So how do people do it during their Masters?

    I currently work full time right now, and have the possibility of going part-time come September when I start my MA. Realistically, how much can one work during a full time MA? Can they at all? Any tips for surviving financially, if aiming for a distinction?

    Any help or suggestions would be appreciated.

    Cheers
    If you're aiming for a distinction, try aiming for 15 hours of part time work a week. I think that's realistic given the workload and your commitments.
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    OP - in answer to your question, I had time (as proved when I found some temporary work in the November-January of my master's year). However, I had the difficulty that I was at Oxford, and despite plenty of relevant retail experience, found it near damn impossible to get retailers in the city to hire me, and I suspect that part of the reason for this is that businesses don't want to get into trouble with the university (even though it's only undergraduates who are forbidden to work in term time).

    However, it doesn't sound like you'll have this problem, since you're already working full-time and will just be reducing your current hours.

    The other thing to consider is the course that you'll be doing; a scientific course that requires many lab hours, for instance, may give you less room for manoeuvre than an arts course.
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    (Original post by Haloface)

    So while this is, of course, top notch, it is far from adequate for any one to survive on. So how do people do it during their Masters?

    I currently work full time right now, and have the possibility of going part-time come September when I start my MA. Realistically, how much can one work during a full time MA? Can they at all? Any tips for surviving financially, if aiming for a distinction?
    A number of people on my masters course worked for around 10-15hrs a week during term-time and some of them achieved merits/distinctions. However, they were mainly international students who were doing language/tutoring work in the evenings, I don't know of anyone who had a weekday retail-type job.
    How many hours a week is the MA in terms of taught time?
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    (Original post by Haloface)
    Yellow.

    I've just found out the incredible news that I have been awarded funding for my taught MA in History. This is, of course, brilliant - it enables me to undertake an MA whereas previously I didn't think I'd manage to save even the course fee's this year. The funding is enough to cover full fee's plus a maintenance of about 4k on top of that.

    So while this is, of course, top notch, it is far from adequate for any one to survive on. So how do people do it during their Masters?

    I currently work full time right now, and have the possibility of going part-time come September when I start my MA. Realistically, how much can one work during a full time MA? Can they at all? Any tips for surviving financially, if aiming for a distinction?

    Any help or suggestions would be appreciated.

    Cheers
    I'm currently doing my MA full time and working 20 hours a week in a regular office based job. Just got my fist term one essay back and got a distinction, which proves it is doable. Though I must say I'm pretty busy most of the time and definitely can't take advantage of being a student again the way that most people on my course do. Although it's not too bad during term time. I found end of the term and trying to juggle all the essay writing and work a bit daunting. But it is still possible.
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    (Original post by tigermoth99)
    If you're aiming for a distinction, try aiming for 15 hours of part time work a week. I think that's realistic given the workload and your commitments.
    I agree with this.

    I work one night a week from 7pm to 11 am (some sleeping included!) as a carer and then take friday off to recover/chill/catch up on things non-course related. So along with volunteering one day a week as well I get 5 days of study in and for me that's a great balance and my work is going well. Obviously depending on yourself and what you do you might want to do more or less than that. It also helps that my workload is spread out across the entire year and two of my dissertations are due in August. One exam I have is a slightly harder version of one I did last year and I spent about a month over Christmas with no social life doing all the research for my biggest project (15,000 words in for June) so I'm about almost 2/3s the way through it. It's all about managing your time well and making sure you start doing relevant reading as early as possible on starting the course.
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    (Original post by Angelil)
    The other thing to consider is the course that you'll be doing; a scientific course that requires many lab hours, for instance, may give you less room for manoeuvre than an arts course.
    But equally, the rhythm of an arts course may leave you with large stretches of free time followed by short periods of intense work. It's important to either have a good work ethic and be prepared to do a fair amount of grunt work before the crunch time, or have a job which will allow you to vary your hours somewhat. It's all about strategy.
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    My MA History course was 6 hours a week and I worked just one day a week. However, after about April I stopped working purely because of the amount of primary research I was having to do for varying assignments and the dissertation. It does tend to build up very quickly and it's not something you can skive over.
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    Ah, some top notch advise, finally, thanks guys.

    10-15 hours, or about two shifts, is what I was thinking too. It is a history course, and attendence appears to be 2 days a week. I'm estimating another 2 days conducting primary research, and then 2 days working with a day off per week - should cover it, and financially it means I can supplement my small bursary to cover commuting fares etc, without having to stress so much.
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    good stuff!

    so 15 hours seems about reasonable.
 
 
 
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