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    Hey guys, I'm trying to pull a sub-7:00 2k, but by personal best so far is 7:00 exactly. Any advice?
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    (Original post by IQ Test)
    Hey guys, I'm trying to pull a sub-7:00 2k, but by personal best so far is 7:00 exactly. Any advice?
    Don't stress about it too much. If you've pulled 7:00 you can be pretty sure that you have the necessary physiology to break 7:00, you just need to go out there and do it.

    Make sure you have a good race plan to pace yourself. I usually aim for something along the lines of Target, target + 1, target, target -1, so for you that would be: 1:45, 1:46, 1:45, 1:44.

    Good luck!
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    (Original post by IQ Test)
    Hey guys, I'm trying to pull a sub-7:00 2k, but by personal best so far is 7:00 exactly. Any advice?
    I know it sounds obvious but....train more? :P

    It comes with time and commitment, and it's not only one thing i.e. just doing 500m pieces will help, but to get the maximum improvement you need to work on all aspects of your fitness.

    My suggestions:
    - Once a week do 1 x 60minute erg UT2
    - Once a week do 3 x 20minute ergs
    - Once a fortnight do 8 x 500m erg pieces
    - Once a fortnight do 4 x 1500m erg pieces

    I'm not saying that's the best combination, but it's a good mix of long and short which will improve both aerobic and anaerobic fitness.

    In addition, as the person above said, have a plan - don't be too ambitious. Aim a bit better than 7:00 and stick to it, remember that as your time gets further and further below 7:00 it's going to get harder and harder to improve it! (The amount of effort it takes to improve your time from 7:00 to 6:55 is less than to improve it from 6:55 to 6:50) Good luck
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    (Original post by dobbs)
    In addition, as the person above said, have a plan - don't be too ambitious. Aim a bit better than 7:00 and stick to it, remember that as your time gets further and further below 7:00 it's going to get harder and harder to improve it! (The amount of effort it takes to improve your time from 7:00 to 6:55 is less than to improve it from 6:55 to 6:50) Good luck
    Whilst this is true, it doesn't mean there aren't enormous gains which can be made. I went from 7:18 to 6:58 to 6:30 between January '10 and January '11 and January '12. (point being that I improved 20 seconds the first year, 28 seconds the second year).
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    (Original post by SimonM)
    Whilst this is true, it doesn't mean there aren't enormous gains which can be made. I went from 7:18 to 6:58 to 6:30 between January '10 and January '11 and January '12. (point being that I improved 20 seconds the first year, 28 seconds the second year).
    Oh yeah I completely agree, because probably when you started you weren't in the right mindset and technique wasn't perfect etc. and so as you get more experienced as a rower actually you can push yourself more and you sort of "know how to" do better, it's just doing the work to make it count.

    It's just that, the work involved to improve that much more, is a lot more
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    I can get down to the gym about 2-3 times a week, but I don't want to be "hogging" the ergs as I'm not in a boat club, it's just my local leisure centre gym. Do you think that doing interval training/ 30min erg sessions would help my time to decrease?

    Oh how I wish there was a boat club where I live...
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    (Original post by IQ Test)
    I can get down to the gym about 2-3 times a week, but I don't want to be "hogging" the ergs as I'm not in a boat club, it's just my local leisure centre gym. Do you think that doing interval training/ 30min erg sessions would help my time to decrease?

    Oh how I wish there was a boat club where I live...
    If you pay for gym membership you have every right to use whichever apparatus you like for as long as you like :rolleyes:

    There are plenty of people who aren't in boat clubs and class themselves as "Indoor rowers" and go to the National Indoor Rowing Champs, I'm sure they spend a lot of time on ergs in gyms too.

    I used to when I went home from university and went to my local gym. Just like if someone was training for a marathon they may be on a treadmill for 1hr+, only the 3x20min session I mentioned above would take more than 1hr (1hr 15m with 5 min rests)
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    Hi there,

    I'm currently coxing at my college (oxbridge) but I'm finding that I talk too much/not enough to the point. So, I was wondering whether anyone had anything that they particularly like their coxes to call? (or any coxes have any calls which they find work well!) Anything sharp and to the point which particularly helps to coach the boat/motivate in races (generally 1km-2.5km)?? Or just anything in general! I'm currently coxing men, but sub for the women every now and then.

    Thanks!
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    (Original post by Becca :))
    Hi there,

    I'm currently coxing at my college (oxbridge) but I'm finding that I talk too much/not enough to the point. So, I was wondering whether anyone had anything that they particularly like their coxes to call? (or any coxes have any calls which they find work well!) Anything sharp and to the point which particularly helps to coach the boat/motivate in races (generally 1km-2.5km)?? Or just anything in general! I'm currently coxing men, but sub for the women every now and then.

    Thanks!
    Lots of technical calls during paddling. Nothing worse than a cox who just steers for the whole outing without contributing to the coaching. How does the boat feel to you? Is this rhythm good? Are you being thrown about at the catch? Is everyone pulling their weight? What's the coach trying to get the crew to do?

    During races, calls which bring everyone together are always helpful, but most of all I want to know what you're going to say beforehand. I always like to know what's going on, how close are we to getting the next whistle, bumping, being bumped, how long have we been going, how long is left, what's the stroke rate, are we moving on them, how much energy do we have left, etc
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    (Original post by SimonM)
    Lots of technical calls during paddling. Nothing worse than a cox who just steers for the whole outing without contributing to the coaching. How does the boat feel to you? Is this rhythm good? Are you being thrown about at the catch? Is everyone pulling their weight? What's the coach trying to get the crew to do?

    During races, calls which bring everyone together are always helpful, but most of all I want to know what you're going to say beforehand. I always like to know what's going on, how close are we to getting the next whistle, bumping, being bumped, how long have we been going, how long is left, what's the stroke rate, are we moving on them, how much energy do we have left, etc
    Thanks for your response

    Obviously I'm doing some technical calls eg hanging loose, catches/finishes, body positions, controlling recovery etc etc, but are there any individual calls that you find particularly useful?

    Ok, that's a good point about knowing before what the calls will be - bumps is a strange race, so I guess you're basically boiling it down to communication?? Do you like the same approach in a head race?
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    (Original post by Becca :))
    Thanks for your response

    Obviously I'm doing some technical calls eg hanging loose, catches/finishes, body positions, controlling recovery etc etc, but are there any individual calls that you find particularly useful?

    Ok, that's a good point about knowing before what the calls will be - bumps is a strange race, so I guess you're basically boiling it down to communication?? Do you like the same approach in a head race?
    Knowing what the rowers should be feeling when you are making the calls is important. Often coxes just say things "control the slide", "weight on the feet" etc, but don't really appreciate what the rower is feeling. If you can work to understand what the boat is aiming at, then your crew will appreciate what you're doing much more. What is the call "catches" trying to achieve? What response are you expecting from your crew? As for individuals, I want to be picked up on everything I'm doing wrong. I sit at bow in my boat, and yesterday our cox kept making us repeat roll-ups. From where I could see, everyone was in-time looking pretty good, so I can only assume that I was the person who was off. However, I couldn't tell how I was off, which made the whole exercise futile.

    Bumps is a strange race, but I assume that your crew will have a race plan which you will be talking them through. It will obviously involve several scenarios, "FaT are about to bump our - it's now or never" - "Jesus are gaining, hold them off" etc, but the last thing you want to hear is that the cox is surprised or panicked about what's happening. Yes, in a head race I would ideally want the whole race planned out ahead of time and the only 'unexpected' calls would be from the cox bringing the crew back onto the rhythm we'd targeted.
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    (Original post by Becca :))
    Hi there,

    I'm currently coxing at my college (oxbridge) but I'm finding that I talk too much/not enough to the point. So, I was wondering whether anyone had anything that they particularly like their coxes to call? (or any coxes have any calls which they find work well!) Anything sharp and to the point which particularly helps to coach the boat/motivate in races (generally 1km-2.5km)?? Or just anything in general! I'm currently coxing men, but sub for the women every now and then.

    Thanks!
    Hi Becca

    Being a 5'7 male I have both rowed and coxed due to being too short to be a particularly effective rower (unless I'm in a single!) and actually sort of too tall/heavy (68kg) to be an effective cox. But I think firstly it's good to have done both, so my first advice is as soon as possible try and do some rowing yourself (the summer is a good time to do this) just so you know exactly what you're talking about when you're making certain calls.

    I could go on for hours (I used to run the 'Learn to cox' course at my old club in Newcastle), but I'll stick to your question about calls for 2k races.

    Firstly - rhythm. You'll find that your 'suitcase of calls' (i.e. those calls you are aware of and you know work well) will last longer if you don't just drone them out like you're having a regular conversation with your crew. Make your calls very short, snappy, and if possible on the catch and the finish....

    "Right........I want........Next stroke......Sharper catches......Go!"

    That's especially when you're giving a command, you can say things like "This is good boys, this is GOOD!" together, that's fine, but commands (particularly technical commands) should be sharp and in rhythm with the boat. And actually, they don't always have to be commands, this is going to sound stupid but I tried it once with the women I was coxing during one of our practice pieces and they LOVED it....make like a "Hurrrhhh" noise on the catch and then "Chaa" on the finish (this is hard to explain without making the noise. But it would go "Hurrhhh....Chaa! Hurrhhh...Chaa!" or if you're counting for something (not that counting is always good) use the Cha's again "Six...Cha! Seven...Cha!"

    OK - actual calls:

    Catch.....Finish
    Legs.....DOWN! (repeat over 3 strokes)
    Feeling.....STRONG
    Lean.....BACK
    a particular favourite that my girls loved....."Lonnnnng hold this from catch then on the finish say sharply...Strokes! then the next stroke I would call Stronnnng.....Strokes!

    If you're calling for a longer stroke, then once you've called "Give me an extra inch forwards at the catch!!" or "Lean back into it!" then also call THERE....to.....THERE!, for about three strokes, to try and encourage the increased stroke length to stick.

    Usually about half way through a piece (or a couple of times if it's a 5k+) I will ask for a 'refresh':

    "OK....we're going.......to REFRESH......so Sit UP.......Heads UP......Eyes IN......Strong CORE.....next stroke......SIT UP.....HEADS UP.....EYES IN.....STRONG CORE.....YEAHHHHH.....FEEL THE CHANGE!"

    That's another one - if you make a change, acknowledge it i.e. "That's GOOD! I felt the difference!" or simply "FEEL THE CHANGE"

    Lots of positive strokes - try not to say "Don't do...." but rather tell people what TO do:

    NO: "Bow, you're squaring late!"
    YES: "Bow, early squares!, Let's see the change Bow.....GOOD CHANGE! FEEL IT!!"


    ...Could go on FOREVER....PM me if you want more. There are some good websites out there and I think I might actually still have a good audio file recording of a Team Canada (I think) cox which is fantastic to pick tips from
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    (Original post by Becca :))
    Thanks for your response

    Obviously I'm doing some technical calls eg hanging loose, catches/finishes, body positions, controlling recovery etc etc, but are there any individual calls that you find particularly useful?

    Ok, that's a good point about knowing before what the calls will be - bumps is a strange race, so I guess you're basically boiling it down to communication?? Do you like the same approach in a head race?
    Very good race calls from a junior cox. Calling a race plan, picking up rowers on stuff thats screwing up the boat, and providing info to them, but no real tech calls as its a race.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iO56DsnXtUM

    Obviously when you're paddling you'd want much more technical stuff being drilled in. The worst thing though is when the cox is just calling drills and stuff at random because they feel like it. Do it properly or don't do it at all. Make sure everyone knows what they're looking for in a drill and how to do it and how to make it transfer this back into their proper rowing.

    And navigate properly.

    AND make sure you're really into rowing, like as much as the rowers. Read up on stuff, form your own opinions and talk to the coaches.
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    (Original post by dobbs)
    Hi Becca

    Being a 5'7 male I have both rowed and coxed due to being too short to be a particularly effective rower (unless I'm in a single!) and actually sort of too tall/heavy (68kg) to be an effective cox. But I think firstly it's good to have done both, so my first advice is as soon as possible try and do some rowing yourself (the summer is a good time to do this) just so you know exactly what you're talking about when you're making certain calls.

    I could go on for hours (I used to run the 'Learn to cox' course at my old club in Newcastle), but I'll stick to your question about calls for 2k races.

    Firstly - rhythm. You'll find that your 'suitcase of calls' (i.e. those calls you are aware of and you know work well) will last longer if you don't just drone them out like you're having a regular conversation with your crew. Make your calls very short, snappy, and if possible on the catch and the finish....

    "Right........I want........Next stroke......Sharper catches......Go!"

    That's especially when you're giving a command, you can say things like "This is good boys, this is GOOD!" together, that's fine, but commands (particularly technical commands) should be sharp and in rhythm with the boat. And actually, they don't always have to be commands, this is going to sound stupid but I tried it once with the women I was coxing during one of our practice pieces and they LOVED it....make like a "Hurrrhhh" noise on the catch and then "Chaa" on the finish (this is hard to explain without making the noise. But it would go "Hurrhhh....Chaa! Hurrhhh...Chaa!" or if you're counting for something (not that counting is always good) use the Cha's again "Six...Cha! Seven...Cha!"

    OK - actual calls:

    Catch.....Finish
    Legs.....DOWN! (repeat over 3 strokes)
    Feeling.....STRONG
    Lean.....BACK
    a particular favourite that my girls loved....."Lonnnnng hold this from catch then on the finish say sharply...Strokes! then the next stroke I would call Stronnnng.....Strokes!

    If you're calling for a longer stroke, then once you've called "Give me an extra inch forwards at the catch!!" or "Lean back into it!" then also call THERE....to.....THERE!, for about three strokes, to try and encourage the increased stroke length to stick.

    Usually about half way through a piece (or a couple of times if it's a 5k+) I will ask for a 'refresh':

    "OK....we're going.......to REFRESH......so Sit UP.......Heads UP......Eyes IN......Strong CORE.....next stroke......SIT UP.....HEADS UP.....EYES IN.....STRONG CORE.....YEAHHHHH.....FEEL THE CHANGE!"

    That's another one - if you make a change, acknowledge it i.e. "That's GOOD! I felt the difference!" or simply "FEEL THE CHANGE"

    Lots of positive strokes - try not to say "Don't do...." but rather tell people what TO do:

    NO: "Bow, you're squaring late!"
    YES: "Bow, early squares!, Let's see the change Bow.....GOOD CHANGE! FEEL IT!!"


    ...Could go on FOREVER....PM me if you want more. There are some good websites out there and I think I might actually still have a good audio file recording of a Team Canada (I think) cox which is fantastic to pick tips from
    Thank you so much, that is genuinely ever so helpful!

    I definitely see what you mean about rowing - I have had a short session in a tub a while ago which helped a bit, I'll try and get out again with the next lot of novices. I've looked on British Rowing and my closest club at home is a half hour train journey, so I'm not sure how plausible that'll be - is it worth just doing some work on an erg to try and sort out my own technique?

    You've also given me confidence that I had the right idea but you've definitely given me fresh ideas like the 'refresh' - it sounds an obvious thing to do now you've said it but I'd never have thought of it! I'm going out with the uni dev squad and my college crew later so I'll see if I can encorporate some new calls then

    If you have that recording anywhere it would be fab if I could hear it!

    Thanks again


    (Original post by partoftheweekend)
    Very good race calls from a junior cox. Calling a race plan, picking up rowers on stuff thats screwing up the boat, and providing info to them, but no real tech calls as its a race.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iO56DsnXtUM

    Obviously when you're paddling you'd want much more technical stuff being drilled in. The worst thing though is when the cox is just calling drills and stuff at random because they feel like it. Do it properly or don't do it at all. Make sure everyone knows what they're looking for in a drill and how to do it and how to make it transfer this back into their proper rowing.

    And navigate properly.

    AND make sure you're really into rowing, like as much as the rowers. Read up on stuff, form your own opinions and talk to the coaches.
    Thanks to you too

    The recording is really useful!

    By navigating properly do you just mean sticking to my side of the river and not overly using the rudder etc?
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    (Original post by Anatheme)
    I'm sure I'm not the only rower on TSR, so come on guys (and girls) :teeth:

    I am rower.
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    Uelbc
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    Aaah, I forgot about this thread!
    After a year out, I decided to come back to rowing, but I'm coxing instead. It's all good, except I feel like I've hit a wall, and need a couple of outings cycling with the coach to see the rowers from another angle. :holmes:
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    Anyone coxed/rowed at Dorney before? Any tips?

    I'm coxing the Uni Dev Squad at met regatta next weekend - I'm doing a IV+ and possibly an VIII+ (although the cox of the other IV+ is more experienced than me so I'm probably not doing that one!)

    Thanks!
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    (Original post by Becca :))
    Anyone coxed/rowed at Dorney before? Any tips?

    I'm coxing the Uni Dev Squad at met regatta next weekend - I'm doing a IV+ and possibly an VIII+ (although the cox of the other IV+ is more experienced than me so I'm probably not doing that one!)

    Thanks!
    Can't really help but good luck anyway
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    (Original post by Becca :))
    Anyone coxed/rowed at Dorney before? Any tips?

    I'm coxing the Uni Dev Squad at met regatta next weekend - I'm doing a IV+ and possibly an VIII+ (although the cox of the other IV+ is more experienced than me so I'm probably not doing that one!)

    Thanks!
    Theres usually a slight cross at Dorney so make sure your bow dudes know to point your bow slightly into the wind on the start. Also know all the circulation patterns and shiz. And the Pineapple pub in Dorney does great sandwiches if you need somewhere to go between races.
 
 
 
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