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Does it matter which university you get your degree from? watch

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    (Original post by DaveJ)
    Lmao. There is no way the expoly guy was more intelligent. No chance. I think that's incredibly naive - the Cambridge course is clearly massively more difficult. All Cambridge students are expected to put in ridiculous amounts of hours each week to keep up.
    The majority of Oxbridge students are not only intelligent, but have capitalised on their natural ability by being baby fed in public schools. An expoly guy from a disadvantaged background could easily be more intelligent. The ridiculous amount of hours put in doesn't seem to indicate intellect and processing efficiency. As for those with good A-levels getting 2:1s at redbricks, it is well known that those with really good A-levels usually do not do get the firsts at university because they are less motivated to prove themselves. In Oxbridge pretty much everyone will pass with a 2:1 and a third will pass with a first, whereas in an expoly a 2:1 will be about a third and only a half dozen from each year will pass with a first. The fact that more quality go to oxbridge is borne out in the higher quantity of high degree classifications, but expolys do catch and highlight the occasional bright spark that has slipped through the cracks.

    The quality in 'higher universities' comes mainly down to research and many expolys have equal capacity in undergraduate teaching - if not, then the expoly first is worth even more.
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    Being 'highly intelligent' can often mean you don't see the wood for the trees. It doesn't mean you'll be the best performer / best coordinator / best communicator / best leader / best achiever / best earner for the firm etc etc etc.

    Hence, get over this 'employers only want top graduates from top uni's'. They don't.
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    (Original post by uer23)
    But with a higher ranked uni your more likely to be equipped with all the skills/knowledge for that subject because you will have better lecturers, uni gets more funds etc. With a lower ranked uni you'll just have a lower chance to flourish as the uni will not provided a better platform than say the better ranked ones. Doesn't mean your bound to flop if you go to a low ranked uni.
    Well a good researcher does not make a good lecturer, so saying top unis have the best lecturers is probably a mistake.
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    (Original post by Dnator)
    when are you updating your sig
    Now that I'm online lol.
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    (Original post by EierVonSatan)
    They will definitely know which university you've attended! You should look at each course and university separately and make an informed decision on where you want to go
    and.. yes it does matter, and so does what the degree is in. It depends what you wish to do after uni. But.. don't just pick a uni cos it is "good", pick it because it is where you want to be!
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    (Original post by byronage)
    There is another point here regarding what employers can or may think - people who are actually in Industry / Commerce.

    They think that going to a top Uni tell's them one thing, you are good at being an academic. That's all it tells them. Who are these 'top lecturers in the top uni's'? They are academics. Why are they lecturers and teaching and not out there in the big wide world? Is it, perhaps, because they are academic and can't do anything else or this is the best thing for them? Hence the saying 'Those that can, do. Those that can't, teach.'

    Generalising of course and not universally true, but it's what many people out there running firms think. However these are the people who employ people and is why they don't always go for Oxbridge grads, in fact the ones that want or need an Oxbridge grad are a minority.
    Places with high pay, excellent benefits and generous working conditions are also in a minority. :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by TerryTerry)
    Myth.
    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/ed...es-710422.html
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    Hi, sorry but you seem to know your stuff so perhaps you can help me?

    1) Is Dundee University considered a bad university for Law?

    2) Will me going to a private school be overlooked or will it give me a bigger chance in getting employment?

    Thank you for any help you may wish to give.
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    Law
    1 Cambridge
    2 London School of Economics
    3 Oxford
    4 Nottingham
    5 University College London
    6 Aberdeen
    7 Durham
    8 Dundee
    9 King's College London
    10 Strathclyde
    11 Edinburgh
    12 Bristol
    13 Glasgow
    14 Queen Mary
    15 SOAS
    16 Leicester
    17 Birmingham
    18 Southampton
    19 Manchester
    20 Warwick

    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/ed...ns-813758.html
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    It doesn't matter if you're studying medicine because the employer doesn't know.

    I'm guessing you're not a medic though, so yes, you'll either put it on your CV, or you'll leave it off and they'll ask you in interview why you left it off and where you really went to.

    There are tonnes of things which contribute to somebody getting a job: institution attended, classification, modules taken, module marks, past employment, work experience/internships, projects completed, extra curriculars, lower qualifications (e.g. GCSE, A-Level), application form, CV, how time's been spent, bespoke tests, performance in interview etc etc.

    The institution attended is just one of those factors.

    Thursday, 10 August 2000

    I consider that a bit old, given the changes in university admissions alone over the past 10 years. There are way more under-privileged students attending university and studying all courses, in all institutions.

    (Original post by byronage)
    There is another point here regarding what employers can or may think - people who are actually in Industry / Commerce.

    They think that going to a top Uni tell's them one thing, you are good at being an academic. That's all it tells them. Who are these 'top lecturers in the top uni's'? They are academics. Why are they lecturers and teaching and not out there in the big wide world? Is it, perhaps, because they are academic and can't do anything else or this is the best thing for them? Hence the saying 'Those that can, do. Those that can't, teach.'

    Generalising of course and not universally true, but it's what many people out there running firms think. However these are the people who employ people and is why they don't always go for Oxbridge grads, in fact the ones that want or need an Oxbridge grad are a minority.
    Most lecturers are researchers I find - researchers who need the extra cash. They're researchers because they enjoy the purity of the subject, enjoy research in its essence, or want a PhD behind them.

    And no, I really do doubt that it's "what many people out there running firms think". Not everybody is in this life for money or the "top job".
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    (Original post by ILoveRona)
    Hi, sorry but you seem to know your stuff so perhaps you can help me?

    1) Is Dundee University considered a bad university for Law?

    2) Will me going to a private school be overlooked or will it give me a bigger chance in getting employment?

    Thank you for any help you may wish to give.
    You seem to have answered #1 yourself, as for #2 I doubt it would give you a bigger chance.
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    (Original post by JW92)
    There are definitely other factors but I wouldn't say it's a terrible analogy. The calibre of students and teaching staff is generally going to be better at Oxford or Cambridge than Durham, where the calibre of students and staff is probably going to be better than Nottingham. If this weren't true, then A grade students would apply to ex-polys because they like the course and city, but overwhelmingly they don't.
    Some do, I know two people with AAA going to ex-polys...
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    (Original post by Fusilero)
    Places with high pay, excellent benefits and generous working conditions are also in a minority. :rolleyes:
    Perhaps, but that isn't to say that the minority from the top Uni's with the top grades get them because they don't.

    I'm just pointing out this fact to help those obsessing or worrying about all this stuff that there is no need to and that it can actually be detrimental to be seen as academic and that this is just a small part of what makes a good employee.
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    (Original post by DarkWhite)
    And no, I really do doubt that it's "what many people out there running firms think". Not everybody is in this life for money or the "top job".
    I wasn't saying that everybody is in this life for money or the "top job" was I?

    As for what people running firms think, that's my experience, take it or leave it. I'm giving the benefit of my knowledge in order to assure, I'm not in any way having a go at academics. I'm just trying to dispel what appears to be some misplaced assumptions.
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    not sure about in other professions, but in law we at oxbridge ***** every other uni! literally you go to the interview days and around 60% of the interview candidates will be oxbridge. of those who get in the vast majority will be oxbridge (at least in top firms in the city)
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    (Original post by byronage)
    They think that going to a top Uni tell's them one thing, you are good at being an academic. That's all it tells them. Who are these 'top lecturers in the top uni's'? They are academics. Why are they lecturers and teaching and not out there in the big wide world? Is it, perhaps, because they are academic and can't do anything else or this is the best thing for them? Hence the saying 'Those that can, do. Those that can't, teach.'
    I agree that most employers are looking for more than a degree with a brand name. A bit of experience or evidence of development of soft skills are highly beneficial to have.

    However, I'm not sure I can really follow your application of the 'those that can, do, those that can't, teach" addage to academics. These people do 'do' for the most part as they are primarily researchers and that is what they are good at and I don't see why this is any different to other career paths.
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    (Original post by byronage)
    I wasn't saying that everybody is in this life for money or the "top job" was I?

    As for what people running firms think, that's my experience, take it or leave it. I'm giving the benefit of my knowledge in order to assure, I'm not in any way having a go at academics. I'm just trying to dispel what appears to be some misplaced assumptions.
    I never said you did say people were in it for the top job; I was simply pointing out why lecturers lecture, to answer that question, "Why aren't they out running firms etc?"

    But you phrased it as a fact, not as an opinion, so let's not mislead people. Because let's face it, I've had experience with employers in industry, government and small business and I've not met one with similar views, so it's clearly not a majority, and certainly not a factual, view. Reminds me of the old argument that employers would prefer people with a 2:1 to a 1st because it shows they've had fun, but after speaking with many employers, they simply don't agree.
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    (Original post by LiveFastDieYoung)
    not sure about in other professions, but in law we at oxbridge ***** every other uni! literally you go to the interview days and around 60% of the interview candidates will be oxbridge. of those who get in the vast majority will be oxbridge (at least in top firms in the city)
    Because that does nothing to dispel the myth your all arrogant [email protected]

    Anyway, OP; yes it does matter, but not half as much as people on TSR will generally have you believe. People employ people, they do not employ grades or degrees. If you are a well rounded individual who can talk the talk in an interview and are generally a likeable person then it is a much much bigger advantage than being from a better uni.

    The way I (and most employers) see it there are different "classes" of uni. You have Oxbridge who are academically the best, then you have the Russell Group, then you have a larger group of lesser universities. The difference between selection, generally, between Russell Group Uni's is bugger all. It wont make that much of a difference if you go to Warwick or Newcastle for the majority of courses. However, Warwick is known for certain subjects, such as business, and employers will target Warwick students from the business school, so if you wanted to do work in the City, Warwick does have an advantage. For the more general degrees - maths, biology, etc, the difference is negliable.

    On the whole it comes down to you as a person rather than which uni you go to, provided you are at a reasonably good insitution.
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    (Original post by ChemistBoy)
    However, I'm not sure I can really follow your application of the 'those that can, do, those that can't, teach" addage to academics.
    It isn't my opinion it's a perspective that people in industry can have to those in academia. An incorrect one which I only used to juxtapose the similarly incorrect perception that employers would start with the 'top uni's / top grade' first, then work their way down, when looking for the best employee.

    Some might in some professions but by no means enough for it to be a concern when choosing which uni to go to which is the subject of the thread.
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    (Original post by Riderz)
    The way I (and most employers) see it there are different "classes" of uni. You have Oxbridge who are academically the best, then you have the Russell Group, then you have a larger group of lesser universities. The difference between selection, generally, between Russell Group Uni's is bugger all. It wont make that much of a difference if you go to Warwick or Newcastle for the majority of courses. However, Warwick is known for certain subjects, such as business, and employers will target Warwick students from the business school, so if you wanted to do work in the City, Warwick does have an advantage. For the more general degrees - maths, biology, etc, the difference is negliable.
    So, St. Andrews, Durham and York are all 'lesser universities', and Sussex, Bath, Essex, Exeter, Leicester, Queen Mary and so on belong in the same band ('lesser universities') as Thames Valley and London Met?

    Using the Russell Group to prove university reputation is always facile.
 
 
 
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