Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/education/8341589.stm
    Denmark has started it, what are everyones views on this? Should we adopt the same method in the UK?
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    I'm afraid all my time would be spent procrastinating on TSR
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I did a test GCSE French listening exam online before a couple of months ago in school for trials, I wasn't too fond of it to be honest.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Pretty sure my friend at uni in Leiden last semester were allowed their laptop and internet in their exams last year.

    They said it worked well and they had no chance to procrastinate/communicate anyway.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Its not a bad idea, certainly a bold move!
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by tokyo29)
    I did a test GCSE French listening exam online before a couple of months ago in school for trials, I wasn't too fond of it to be honest.
    They're not talking about doing the exam online, but having access to the internet during the exam.

    I think it's a pretty stupid idea really . I mean on one hand, you still have the time to deal with, and often enough, there is just about enough time to answer the questions and maybe 10 mins to check through the answers. So even though the internet is there as a guide, it really won't be much use because there won't be enough time in an exam without a time extension to search for many answers and write a good response. However, it may make subjects such as English literature a little bit redundant in the teaching, because for things such as learning criticism and quotes, the students can search for a useful website before the exam, and then use this as a point of reference. There will also come a stage where people can use the internet then to manipulate this system, so maybe uploading all their class notes onto the internet so when they come across a question which they can't answer, they can open up the correct page and then quickly find the answer. For this reason, I am against it, since it's not really testing the student on the subject at hand, but rather how well a student can use the internet to avoid learning things and abuse the system.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    Thats retarded.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    you coudl just use wolfram alpha for all the maths questions
    there's probably similar for some other subjects, i don't know
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    It's an interesting idea. I've always considered 'closed' book' exams to be a somewhat artificial situation, as in much of everyday life there's the opportunity to look something up if you don't know it immediately. However, there's definitely an argument that there are things that you should be expected to be able to answer without having to refer to an external source. I suppose that there would be a limit on how much help the internet could be, as it will always take longer to look something up than to answer something that you already have knowledge on...

    The rule about no communication with others is where I see one difficulty. As they mention in the video, this is likely to be very hard to reliably enforce, and I suspect that what constitutes communication could become something of a 'grey area'. I'd be very interested to see how this develops on a relatively small scale, as to implement this on a national level could present quite a few challenges for us in the UK. I didn't notice any mention of who provides the laptops from that video clip. Are schools going to have to have enough laptops to accommodate every student sitting an exam, or are students going to be allowed to use their own computers? If the latter, I'd be concerned at the expectation that everyone should be expected to buy a laptop, as well as the potential for unfairness from individual students having a better laptop than others (in terms of speed of response, etc.).

    On a practical level, again the video is unclear what other facilities will be available on the computers (though I think saw iTunes open in one case, suggesting no restrictions). Software is available to 'lock down' what programs can be used (I've done exams in which the use of personal laptops for word processing/spreadsheets is allowed, but nothing else), so that would be one solution to that issue. I'd be very concerned at the potential for cheating if all of a computer's facilities were available.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by schoolstudent)
    you coudl just use wolfram alpha for all the maths questions
    there's probably similar for some other subjects, i don't know
    yeah, google
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by schoolstudent)
    you coudl just use wolfram alpha for all the maths questions
    there's probably similar for some other subjects, i don't know
    This is where question design would be crucially important. If the majority of the credit is for your working, this issue would perhaps less important, though for simpler situations I'd agree that there's not really any other way to set questions than to ask what the answer to a particular calculation is. Even worse, if full access to a computer was available, some software can show you every step of working for many maths problems!
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    I frequently suffered in 'closed book' exams because my memory is particularly bad. My problem solving abilities may be exceptional but if my memory isnt great im never going to do well in standard exams.

    Should we thus allow exams which test more then just memory, as a majority of current exams seem to do? In my opinion: yes.

    Plus in the real world, if you dont know how to complete an answer you go and find out the method to do so.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Reue)
    Plus in the real world, if you dont know how to complete an answer you go and find out the method to do so.
    I suppose it depends on the situation. If you're doing some detailed calculations and need to look up a specific method, or researching an article (for example), then I'd agree with you. However, would you want a doctor/surgeon who didn't have a strong knowledge of any procedures that they were to be carrying out?

    Clearly these are just some cases where this is a more 'clear-cut' distinction, but I'd suggest that there are times when 'closed-book' exams are appropriate.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    For some areas I think this is definitely the way forward.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Illusionary)
    This is where question design would be crucially important. If the majority of the credit is for your working, this issue would perhaps less important, though for simpler situations I'd agree that there's not really any other way to set questions than to ask what the answer to a particular calculation is. Even worse, if full access to a computer was available, some software can show you every step of working for many maths problems!
    Wolfram shows you a fair chunk of working out for integration of stuff. Be a stupid idea, However they could make like 1 website viewable with all content on. and you browse just that site.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I think that it makes sense in quite a lot of exams because, let's face it, you can use the internet in the ordinary world.
    Doesn't everyone use the internet when doing practice essay questions anyway?

    But for things like maths and accounting, a definite nope!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    that would be neat, purely for the ability to listen to music
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Pheylan)
    that would be neat, purely for the ability to listen to music
    But listening to music would be wasting time in the examination, it may also improve the ability to concentrate (if you're a person who finds that listening to music helps with studying), so isn't that cheating?

    There is also the question of how much the Internet is supposed to help you. With the Internet you wouldn't really need to learn anything beforehand, would you? It's all on the web, you'd just copy and paste it (write it down).

    Also, how will Internet usage be enforced? Will websites such as Wolfram Alpha be banned?
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    In a way, I somewhat agree.

    I agree in the sense that, take my programming exams for example. We can't be expected to know every single function already defined in the Java programming language (there are thousands). They're soon to make it so that we're allowed to access the JDK reference online, since it would cost a ridiculous amount of money to print and it changes every few months so would need to be reprinted. This seems fine to me, and so does being able to access web-sites including pseudo-code for common algorithms and the like. Because let's face it, when I'm out there in the real world working, I'm not going to be restricted from accessing the JDK. If I don't have Internet access, we'll at least have some dusty old book given to us, but the latter is unlikely.

    But then if you consider something such as science, well, that's a bit different. Let's take Physics. In our Physics exams we're expected to know certain formulae, as it's more likely that we'll understand them, and if we had access to the Internet we could just bring up a list of formulae, plug some values in and come out with the correct answer. There's an array of pre-made tools on the net which will even do the calculations for you, and certainly for Physics, I know of one web-site in particular which has a tool for every formula.

    My major concern however would be the knowledge being assessed. Let's take the above example and then say that instead, we'll ask students to answer wordy questions. Well these questions still come from the specification, which is [quite rightly] available to all. So there's going to be at least one web-site which tells you everything you need to know to pass the exam in one way or another.

    So I'd like to see it implemented for some subjects, but not for others. The problem is drawing the line and saying which are suitable subjects. If we're to allow it for all subjects, I think we'd really need to change what we're assessing students on - completely change it.

    Monitoring wouldn't be as difficult as it sounds. It's fairly straightforward to monitor traffic and log it. You could have somebody sit there and read through the traffic later on and deduce what it and isn't cheating, where cheating is blatent use of chat programs and such. There would need to be a rule regarding encryption mind - else people would just sit there in ScatterChat with a 256-bit encrypted chat sharing the answers.
    Offline

    22
    ReputationRep:
    Am I the only one here who thinks that the whole point of exams is to test your personal knowledge? And not someone else's... Feel free to tell me otherwise! :confused:
 
 
 
Poll
How are you feeling in the run-up to Results Day 2018?
Useful resources

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.