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    (Original post by pkmayers)
    Can anyone studying at LSE or King's recommend a good residence? thanks.
    depends on what you mean by good!? en-suite/standard? close to King's/LSE? catered/self-catering? etc.
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    I'm sure you've already made your decision, but for what it's worth, I was accepted to LSE's MSc in International Relations and had no trouble making the decision to go to King's instead for an MA in the War Studies department. I know too many people who complain about subpar teaching at LSE and lack of access to professors. Everyone I've spoken too has raved about King's professors and the amount of personal attention you receive.

    My understanding is that none of these programs, including LSE, King's, Oxford, etc, will compare academically to top-flight MA programs in the states, but King's curriculum looks cutting edge, more so than what you see in IR depts at many American schools. This is part of what swayed me.

    I'm sure there are great experiences to be had at both places, so good luck to you wherever you end up!

    FYI, I'm an American with about four years of work experience, one as an aid worker in Afghanistan.
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    (Original post by Jeremy_Whiskers)
    LSE, it's IR program is the best in the country and highly reputable in academic circles.
    This is true without any bias.

    The IR-Department at LSE is amazing, with great staff and resources.

    Should be an easy choice really.
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    highly debatable. oxonians would dispute that assessment.

    regarding lse vs kcl, it's hard to tell you which programme to choose without you explaining why you want to read for the degree and what you hope to do afterwards. it's really not as simply as saying the lse is 'better' than kings. the war studies department at kings is the best in the country, and there is a strong case for both kings and the lse. don't pay too much attention to prevailing pop-academia opinions of which place is 'better' than the other.
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    This is exactly right - the choice between LSE and King's depends, among other things, on why you're pursuing the degree. I have enough work experience that I don't feel like my competitiveness in the marketplace will be bolstered much by the LSE credential, which is still better known in the United States than that of King's. I also have a particular interest in conflict, intervention, and peacekeeping, which matches more closely with the offerings at King's. The breadth of King's connections within the worlds of conflict-related NGOs and the military was also appealling, as was the presence of the Insurgency Research Group, though LSE surely has connections in other fields (perhaps most other fields) that King's cannot match.

    But aside from the good match between my interests and the substantive focus of King's programs, the consensus on LSE among the IR MSc graduates I spoke to was that they had little access to the quality teaching and resources that make LSE great in IR at the PhD level. The idea of 10-minute office hour slots and prohibitions against contacting professors during dissertation time was unacceptable to me. I hope others have had different experiences, but I heard complaints about this one too many times to make me feel comfortable considering LSE's offer. I very well might explore LSE again if I go for a PhD.

    I have yet to set foot in either institution, so take what I say with a grain of salt, but I hope someone might benefit from hearing about my thought process. I'd be interested to see if my impressions match with those of others who've been in the same position recently.
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    (Original post by lousyreeds1)
    This is exactly right - the choice between LSE and King's depends, among other things, on why you're pursuing the degree. I have enough work experience that I don't feel like my competitiveness in the marketplace will be bolstered much by the LSE credential, which is still better known in the United States than that of King's. I also have a particular interest in conflict, intervention, and peacekeeping, which matches more closely with the offerings at King's. The breadth of King's connections within the worlds of conflict-related NGOs and the military was also appealling, as was the presence of the Insurgency Research Group, though LSE surely has connections in other fields (perhaps most other fields) that King's cannot match.

    But aside from the good match between my interests and the substantive focus of King's programs, the consensus on LSE among the IR MSc graduates I spoke to was that they had little access to the quality teaching and resources that make LSE great in IR at the PhD level. The idea of 10-minute office hour slots and prohibitions against contacting professors during dissertation time was unacceptable to me. I hope others have had different experiences, but I heard complaints about this one too many times to make me feel comfortable considering LSE's offer. I very well might explore LSE again if I go for a PhD.

    I have yet to set foot in either institution, so take what I say with a grain of salt, but I hope someone might benefit from hearing about my thought process. I'd be interested to see if my impressions match with those of others who've been in the same position recently.
    yep i agree with you. i don't know about kings, but i thought the prohibition against contacting professors during dissertation times was enforced at all london universities. the idea is not to give any one student an unfair advantage, and that the work should be exclusively that of the student. it is a wee bit frustating at times though, i imagine.
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    (Original post by pkmayers)
    I was admitted last week to LSE's MSc in IR and KCL's War Studies MA in Peace and Security. As an American, I have little idea of the differences in teaching, career prospects and reputations of the two schools. Any and all advice would be welcome. Good luck to everyone with their admissions process.

    Im also an avid rugby player, so information on which school has the better facilities is a plus too.

    cheers
    First of all congratulations to your offers. Both of them very good courses indeed.

    It really depends on what you want to do and where you want towork in the future. Instead of asking the students studying it (most of them will say the course they are studying is better), you should do more research on the industry and place you are going to work. For example, if you want to go back to USA for a financial job, you should ask those people already in the field about the reputations of these two courses or schools. Hope this helps.
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    Fundamentally different disciplines in my opinion. Both are first rate institutions. My question to you would be what do you want to do when you graduate. Try to marry what the MA does for you and your prospects, it doesn't matter where you came from its what you do when you are there.


    Good luck and safe journey over!
 
 
 

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