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    (Original post by Pegasus92)
    Oscillations is the topic I find difficult in phy5
    We did that for the coursework. Feel quite good about it, it's only the life cycle of stars that seems really complex.

    Also, this is a synoptic paper right? That could be what ruins me.
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    (Original post by The Magnificent KoloToure)
    We did that for the coursework. Feel quite good about it, it's only the life cycle of stars that seems really complex.

    Also, this is a synoptic paper right? That could be what ruins me.
    yeah its synoptic.
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    (Original post by Pegasus92)
    yeah its synoptic.
    So do you think I should revise all of Unit 2? I resat Unit 1 so that's fresh in my mind but I can't remember much about waves and the rest of that paper.
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    (Original post by The Magnificent KoloToure)
    So do you think I should revise all of Unit 2? I resat Unit 1 so that's fresh in my mind but I can't remember much about waves and the rest of that paper.
    yeah, you better for me its the other way round I repeated unit 2 so got to revise unit 1.
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    (Original post by Pegasus92)
    yeah its synoptic.
    Are you kidding? :curious:
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    (Original post by OL1V3R)
    Not sure if there area any experiments to that specific equation but I think I remember the experiments for the different ideal gas laws.

    Boyle's law - for a gas of constant mass and constant temperature, the pressure of a gas is inversely proportional to its volume.

    To illustrate this, just set up a gas supply to a barometer and a measuring tube full of a liquid. If you add small amounts of the gas to the measuring tube, and plot a graph of pressure (read from the barometer) against volume (read from the tube), then it should be a reciprocal graph (i.e. like that of y = 1/x).

    Charles' law - for a gas of constant mass and constant pressure, the volume it occupies is directly proportional to its absolute temperature.

    To illustrate this, just connect a gas supply to an upturned measuring cylinder which is suspended in a beaker of water, on top of a gauze and just above a Bunsen burner. Add a barometer as well and a thermometer inside the beaker. If you change the flame on the Bunsen burner, and plot a graph of absolute temperature (read off the thermometer, and then added 273 to it to make it in Kelvins) against the volume occupied (read from the amount of gas in the cylinder) and it should be a straight line passing through the origin (with a positive gradient).

    Guy-Lussac law - for a gas of constant mass and constant volume, the pressure of the gas is directly proportional to its absolute temperature.

    To illustrate this, just use the same apparatus as in demonstrating Charles' law, but replace the upturned measuring cylinder with a spherical flask directly connected to a barometer, and plot a graph of pressure against absolute temperature, it will be a straight line passing through the origin (with a positive gradient).
    THank you

    For the synoptic area of the paper, how much in depth do you think we need to revise the older units? I'm thinking of just reading through summary sheets, and not actually learning it all. Is that enough, do you think?
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    (Original post by definite_maybe)
    THank you

    For the synoptic area of the paper, how much in depth do you think we need to revise the older units? I'm thinking of just reading through summary sheets, and not actually learning it all. Is that enough, do you think?
    I'm not going to be revising unit 2, even though I've forgotten quite a bit of the waves topic, but it's probably just a good idea to revise the bits that overlap between A2 and AS (e.g. Doppler effect, forces and acceleration, energy, etc.)
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    (Original post by definite_maybe)
    THank you

    For the synoptic area of the paper, how much in depth do you think we need to revise the older units? I'm thinking of just reading through summary sheets, and not actually learning it all. Is that enough, do you think?
    I remember reading somewhere that you don't need to know specific details from previous units but i guess you need to the basics so you can apply it to things like SHM etc.
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    yeah, i did yesterday's physics paper (unit 4 physics 6ph04) and i am referring to it.
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    (Original post by Pegasus92)
    yeah its synoptic.
    synoptic?? you mean for old syllabus?
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    Someone linked on the Unit 4 thread a collection of 190 past paper questions, is there one of one those for Unit 5?

    Also I'm a little confused when it mentioned the potential energy as being part of the internal energy. What does it mean by the potential?
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    (Original post by Sasukekun)
    Someone linked on the Unit 4 thread a collection of 190 past paper questions, is there one of one those for Unit 5?

    Also I'm a little confused when it mentioned the potential energy as being part of the internal energy. What does it mean by the potential?
    The particles in a heated object have mass, and so they have gravitational fields. As a result, other particles have (gravitational) potential energy relative to the other particles.
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    A large block of ice and I mean a LARGE block of ice has more internal energy than a hot pin.

    What's the definition for internal energy btw? I'm learning: The sum of the potential and kinetic energies of the particles in a sample of matter.
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    I think we should go through definitions. Today I'm studying: Nuclear Physics and brushing up on thermal. I will also do past questions!
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    (Original post by Sasukekun)
    Someone linked on the Unit 4 thread a collection of 190 past paper questions, is there one of one those for Unit 5?

    Also I'm a little confused when it mentioned the potential energy as being part of the internal energy. What does it mean by the potential?
    http://cid-5432f573d3fc3f5a.skydrive...Public/Physics
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    (Original post by OL1V3R)
    The particles in a heated object have mass, and so they have gravitational fields. As a result, other particles have (gravitational) potential energy relative to the other particles.
    Ah, cheers, makes sense.

    (Original post by The Magnificent KoloToure)
    http://cid-5432f573d3fc3f5a.skydrive...Public/Physics
    Thanks for the link, but the 'Unit 5' link seems to have only questions on unit 1 stuff from what I can see?

    Edit: Just noticed the "Topics" section though, looks good.
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    (Original post by Sasukekun)
    Ah, cheers, makes sense.



    Thanks for the link, but the 'Unit 5' link seems to have only questions on unit 1 stuff from what I can see?

    Edit: Just noticed the "Topics" section though, looks good.
    Oh yeah, looks like you're right. Erm, my only guess would be that they've accidentally put in questions from all the other units into the unit 5 set because it's a synoptic paper?

    But you can still get questions on all the unit 5 topics by going to the topics folder and doing the ones on Astrophysics, Thermal Energy, Oscillations and Nuclear Decay.
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    Unit 5 is N.O.T. synoptic.
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    (Original post by Doughboy)
    Unit 5 is N.O.T. synoptic.
    Are you sure? My teacher's told us that it is, same for a few others in this thread.
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    Anyone willing to set up an IRC to discuss this exam... could use a calaborate revision session..

    And there's no reason for us to believe that it is a synoptic test. They've done away with that with the new syllabus.
 
 
 
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