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Edexcel A2 Physics Unit 5 'Physics from Creation to Collapse' watch

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    In the old specification it was stated clearly 'Unit 6 - Synoptic unit'.
    There is nothing synoptic for the new specification.
    Unit 5 is a normal Unit, just like 1, 2 and 4, with its own stuff to learn.
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    (Original post by HyperNova)
    Anyone willing to set up an IRC to discuss this exam... could use a calaborate revision session..

    And there's no reason for us to believe that it is a synoptic test. They've done away with that with the new syllabus.
    Is it possible to set one up via Elluminate? The thing is, I recently bought a graphics tablet and I could also use a headset to do an online revision session. I've never done one before...

    However, there's a Free Trial registration link on the Elluminate home page, so would it be possible for us to do revision sessions?
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    My teacher said Unit 5 is synoptic but then again i don't really trust him. He said Unit 2 was synoptic.

    This is what the spec say:

    In synoptic assessment there should be a concentration on the
    quality of assessment to ensure that it encourages the development
    of the holistic understanding of the subject.

    Synopticity requires students to connect knowledge, understanding
    and skills acquired in different parts of the Advanced GCE course.

    Synoptic assessment in the context of physics requires students to
    use the skills, knowledge and understanding they have aquired in
    one part of a unit and apply them to another part of the same unit
    or to a different unit. For example, Unit 4 builds on the concepts
    Doesn't really say anything else and doesn't clear anything up. I doubt they'll ask you anything in detail. For that reason, i believe it isn't worth going over the old stuff.
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    A2 Physics is NOT synoptic.

    Only Edexcel New Spec. Biology and Chemistry are synoptic in A2. In the specs for Bio and Chem there is mention of having AS stuff in A2 papers. In Physics there isn't but Unit 4 builds on AS Mechanics and Electricty etc. but they won't ask for specific things!

    Obviously we have to remember simple speed=dist/time and other common sense stuff in every exam but we don't have to know the specifics for these A2 Physics exam. This isn't an assumption it's fact. So stop saying it's synoptic.
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    (Original post by BPat)
    My teacher said Unit 5 is synoptic but then again i don't really trust him. He said Unit 2 was synoptic.

    This is what the spec say:



    Doesn't really say anything else and doesn't clear anything up. I doubt they'll ask you anything in detail. For that reason, i believe it isn't worth going over the old stuff.
    Paragraphs one and two are GENERIC. Meaning they just reused it from the normal science specs [bio and chem have the exact text]

    Paragraph is what is important. It just says that Unit 4 BUILDS on AS, not that we will be tested on specific stuff. Whereas in bio and chem paragraph three says: "Synoptic assessment in the external Units 4 and 5 may draw on AS
    material."
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    Really.. if you're here doing A2 physics then you're more than capable of doing anything that may be even slightly synoptical of the AS course...

    I really wouldn't worry about it. But if you do, just maybe have a look through your AS book once you have finished your revision for Unit 5..
    There were synoptical questions in the unit 4 exam.. you simple had to remember what a d.c. current was and what newtons laws were.. simple as.
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    Fair dos Doughboy, I trust your judgement! But if a waves question comes up in the exam you're personally to blame.
    (Original post by OL1V3R)
    Is it possible to set one up via Elluminate? The thing is, I recently bought a graphics tablet and I could also use a headset to do an online revision session. I've never done one before...

    However, there's a Free Trial registration link on the Elluminate home page, so would it be possible for us to do revision sessions?
    That would be great, but I know nothing about setting it up. Our college let us use watch some Elluminate lectures for maths revision and they do work really well.
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    Can't we use something simple, text based and without the need to download.. =/

    The IRC revision session which was done for the Unit 4 Biology was really good.. I'd hope Doughboy agrees with me.. =]
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    (Original post by The Magnificent KoloToure)
    Fair dos Doughboy, I trust your judgement! But if a waves question comes up in the exam you're personally to blame.
    Yeah, I did once see a SHM question that started off by drawing a diffraction pattern of waves through a harbour.

    (Original post by The Magnificent KoloToure)
    That would be great, but I know nothing about setting it up. Our college let us use watch some Elluminate lectures for maths revision and they do work really well.
    I could always set up a revision session; when I do, there will be a link available and people can just click on it and just download the Java applet to join! Simples!

    I'd love to try this out! Why don't we maybe have several hour sessions - one hour for each topic spread out over next week?
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    Hey Currently revising the oscillation stuff. In the spec it mentions needing to know how plastic deformation affects amplitude. What exactly do we need to know for this, just that it causes amplitude to decrease or any more detail? Also, does anybody know if we need to know about the star classes mentioned in the red book or not?
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    (Original post by OL1V3R)
    Yeah, I did once see a SHM question that started off by drawing a diffraction pattern of waves through a harbour.



    I could always set up a revision session; when I do, there will be a link available and people can just click on it and just download the Java applet to join! Simples!

    I'd love to try this out! Why don't we maybe have several hour sessions - one hour for each topic spread out over next week?
    I'd definitely be up for that if there's enough of us, sounds good.
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    "There is a point on the line between the centres of the Earth and the Moon where their gravtitational fields have equal magnitude but are in opposite directions, effectively creating a point of zero gravity. Calculate the distance of this point from the centre of the Earth? "
    [ radii and masses are in the book ]
    can someone solve this?

    Answer : 3.46 x 10^8 m
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    (Original post by definite_maybe)
    Hey Currently revising the oscillation stuff. In the spec it mentions needing to know how plastic deformation affects amplitude. What exactly do we need to know for this, just that it causes amplitude to decrease or any more detail? Also, does anybody know if we need to know about the star classes mentioned in the red book or not?
    I think we should know that ductile materials (ones that undergo plastic deformation) absorb energy, preventing it to be delivered to the oscillating system, hence hight amplitudes will not build up during an oscillation.
    Classifying the stars is not in the syllabus.
    Although OBAFGKM is not difficult to remember just in case (in descending order of temperature, mass, radius and luminosity; ascending lifetime).
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    (Original post by HyperNova)
    Can't we use something simple, text based and without the need to download.. =/

    The IRC revision session which was done for the Unit 4 Biology was really good.. I'd hope Doughboy agrees with me.. =]
    Yea I agree. It's VERY VERY easy to set up an IRC server, but right now I'm studying Biology.

    If anyone wants, I'll set up the IRC server and post the name and link here and you guys can join it. Just give me the okay to make it.
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    (Original post by Joann79)
    "There is a point on the line between the centres of the Earth and the Moon where their gravtitational fields have equal magnitude but are in opposite directions, effectively creating a point of zero gravity. Calculate the distance of this point from the centre of the Earth? "
    [ radii and masses are in the book ]
    can someone solve this?

    Answer : 3.46 x 10^8 m
    I solved it here.
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    (Original post by yadas)
    I solved it here.
    yadas thanks so much! I've been using the gravitaional field formula g= -GMe/r^2= 0 which is no help at all!
    thanks again
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    (Original post by Doughboy)
    Yea I agree. It's VERY VERY easy to set up an IRC server, but right now I'm studying Biology.

    If anyone wants, I'll set up the IRC server and post the name and link here and you guys can join it. Just give me the okay to make it.
    Is there a biology IRC current set up? Cba to check the thread...
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    Just tell me to set one up if you guys want.

    (Original post by HyperNova)
    .
    6BI04's chat was pretty helpful.
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    (Original post by yadas)
    I think we should know that ductile materials (ones that undergo plastic deformation) absorb energy, preventing it to be delivered to the oscillating system, hence hight amplitudes will not build up during an oscillation.
    Classifying the stars is not in the syllabus.
    Although OBAFGKM is not difficult to remember just in case (in descending order of temperature, mass, radius and luminosity; ascending lifetime).
    Thank you

    I've got another question :o: if anyone can help.

    Trying to go over the stars section, and the area about different ways of measuring distance isn't making sense. How does a standard candle work?

    I think it means that there are objects which have luminosities that you know, and you use the inverse square law to work out brightness. You then compare this brightness to another object which has the same luminosty, and by comparing the brightness can work out distance.

    But why if you know the second object's luminosity and brightness, can't you just apply the inverse square law? Why do you need the standard candle?
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    I'll start revising that tomorrow only..
 
 
 
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