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    I've had work experience, voluntary work and everything sorted and have been doing plently of research into Medicine, but recently started talking to junior doctors and now am in two minds. The state the junior doctors were in physically ( eye bags, blood shot eyes) and them telling me that they had been working night shifts and extremely long hours and etc really got me worried and thinking. They told me how soon as they come back from lectures its just work wor work and no social life. I've always wanted to do Medicine and i've done some research into other courses but i'm just not sure.
    But then when i think about not being doing medicine i just... :eek3:
    Is there anyone else in two minds?


    What i want is a fulflilling job which is in healthcare. Does anyone know of any courses?
    I've been thinking about Radiography?
    Ahhhh! :eek3: :eek3: :eek3: :eek3: :eek3: :eek3:
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    (Original post by Steviebwoy101)
    I've had work experience, voluntary work and everything sorted and have been doing plently of research into Medicine, but recently started talking to junior doctors and now am in two minds. The state the junior doctors were in physically ( eye bags, blood shot eyes) and them telling me that they had been working night shifts and extremely long hours and etc really got me worried and thinking. They told me how soon as they come back from lectures its just work wor work and no social life. I've always wanted to do Medicine and i've done some research into other courses but i'm just not sure.
    But then when i think about not being doing medicine i just... :eek3:
    Is there anyone else in two minds?


    What i want is a fulflilling job which is in healthcare. Does anyone know of any courses?
    I've been thinking about Radiography?
    Ahhhh! :eek3: :eek3: :eek3: :eek3: :eek3: :eek3:
    Well you should have known about the unholy working hours at the start. At times it will obviously be boring and repetitive but if you truly enjoy medicine then the positives will outweigh the negatives for you. If you really hate the working hours then maybe look into dentistry?
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    Meh, I think some of them either spout a load of crap, exaggerate or are just bitter. I know three junior doctors who are still associated with my rowing club, they certainly have free time as they still manage to turn up to some social events, some of them row, some of them coach us wee freshers, one of them manages to turn up to almost every sportsnight we have and managed to come on tour with us because she still loves the rowing club.

    Yep, the unholy hours do exist, it's a lot of work, but you do get some free time. You're not working your life away. Basically, I think you need good time management, I think you need the ability to man up, and I think you need a love for the medicine you're practiscing. Then you'll be fine. I think the people you met have let medicine control them, rather than seeing it as work.
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    don't bother
    have a nap instead...then decide on a different subject at uni
    something INTERESTING where the information you're given can really be thought about and connected in interesting ways e.g. physics. i'd imagine (and from what i've seen of textbooks/what i've i've heard) that medicine is just memorising dead, boringly-connected facts facts and knowledge. physics will give you the chance to really think-each new idea you learn about will open up new possibilities. seriously, your thoughts will be far more entertaining if you don't do medicine. physics feels far more "living" to me...it opens up worlds of thought and interesting questions.
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    (Original post by gildartz)
    Well you should have known about the unholy working hours at the start. At times it will obviously be boring and repetitive but if you truly enjoy medicine then the positives will outweigh the negatives for you. If you really hate the working hours then maybe look into dentistry?
    do you truly love it?
    or do you just want to be house? :p:
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    (Original post by schoolstudent)
    don't bother
    have a nap instead...then decide on a different subject at uni
    something INTERESTING where the information you're given can really be thought about and connected in interesting ways e.g. physics. i'd imagine (and from what i've seen of textbooks/what i've i've heard) that medicine is just memorising dead, boringly-connected facts facts and knowledge. physics will give you the chance to really think-each new idea you learn about will open up new possibilities. seriously, your thoughts will be far more entertaining if you don't do medicine.
    If you haven't done medicine, you're not in a position to comment on how interesting it is.
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    I am bit in 2 minds.
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    (Original post by Jessaay!)
    If you haven't done medicine, you're not in a position to comment on how interesting it is.
    Well maybe the non-book bits of the course are interesting...practical stuff etc. But I've seen what they learn from books, and it's dull, unconnected, dry fact!
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    (Original post by schoolstudent)
    Well maybe the non-book bits of the course are interesting...practical stuff etc. But I've seen what they learn from books, and it's dull, unconnected, dry fact!
    Again, I don't think you're in a position to comment. Of course if you look through our books they'll seem like dull, unconnected facts but that's because we use more than one book for a certain thing. Currently I'm revising for a test on the Circulatory and respiratory systems, if I solely used my physiology book I'd know less than half of the information I need for this exam. The connections are only made if you know more than one subject area- we have anatomy, medical sociology, physiology, biochemistry, epidemiology... all of these need to come together for you to see the bigger picture. You also need to see it in real life- see the people affected by the diseases, look at the anatomy in a cadaver if your medical school does full body dissection, do an ECG on someone. If you just look at one area, it seems "unconnected".

    I would be in no position to comment on physics which, if I read one part of one textbook, would seem like dull, unconnected facts, but clearly it's not.
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    (Original post by schoolstudent)
    Well maybe the non-book bits of the course are interesting...practical stuff etc. But I've seen what they learn from books, and it's dull, unconnected, dry fact!
    There are very few facts in medicine. Mostly theories. That's what makes it so interesting.
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    i started a thread about a year ago called ' help, are all junior doctors like this?' serch for it.
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    (Original post by Hippysnake)
    There are very few facts in medicine. Mostly theories. That's what makes it so interesting.
    There are definitely more facts than you'd expect.
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    (Original post by Jessaay!)
    There are definitely more facts than you'd expect.
    I know, just trying to make it sound more interesting....:o:
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    I'm not sure what's wrong with facts tbh *shrugs* I'd imagine physics has a fair amount of facts.
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    (Original post by Jessaay!)
    There are definitely more facts than you'd expect.
    I think the point he was trying to make is that Medicine is not a static subject, new techniques and treatments are being established all the time and there's still plenty we don't know about the human body.
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    (Original post by RightSaidJames)
    I think the point he was trying to make is that Medicine is not a static subject, new techniques and treatments are being established all the time and there's still plenty we don't know about the human body.
    I know, and he was certainly right, but honestly for at least the first couple of years you don't learn about how little we know, but rather how much we do :p:

    I think what makes medicine interesting and "different", however, is the fact there are so many aspects to the knowledge, so many different subjects branching from it, and then all this is applied to disease and treatment. I think it's dynamic, and I realise there are dynamics to other subjects but I'm almost certain they often don't branch as far as the dynamics in medicine.
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    (Original post by Jessaay!)
    I'm not sure what's wrong with facts tbh *shrugs* I'd imagine physics has a fair amount of facts.
    Pretty much everything we know is just a theory or a model. Like gravity, for instance; it doesn't actually exist, it's just something that humans have made up to explain how things don't just randomly float about. That doesn't mean it's untested or unproven, but it will never be solid fact because that's not how science works.

    Similarly, it's pretty much universally established that paracetamol treats mild to moderate pain, but the next paracetamol I take could cause fatal internal bleeding, even if it's never happened to anyone else before and never will happen again. Nothing is perfect, everything is just assumptions based on evidence and/or anecdotes.
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    (Original post by schoolstudent)
    do you truly love it?
    or do you just want to be house? :p:
    I want to be pimping the hot female doctor like house

    At this point i can't truly say whether i'll enjoy it or not and like any other job it is a risk since you don't know for sure how you'll find it. But based on my work experience and interests, I can say that there is a greater probability of me enjoying medicine than the other jobs i've looked in to. I mean, during my GP work experience I spoke to one of the head GPs and he said that he's been working in the same GP for around 7 years now and he can honestly say that he doesn't regret walking into work every morning, unlike some other people he knows.
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    (Original post by RightSaidJames)
    Pretty much everything we know is just a theory or a model. Like gravity, for instance; it doesn't actually exist, it's just something that humans have made up to explain how things don't just randomly float about. That doesn't mean it's untested or unproven, but it will never be solid fact because that's not how science works.

    Similarly, it's pretty much universally established that paracetamol treats mild to moderate pain, but the next paracetamol I take could cause fatal internal bleeding, even if it's never happened to anyone else before and never will happen again. Nothing is perfect, everything is just assumptions based on evidence and/or anecdotes.
    Gravity doesn't exist?

    Are you sure?

    Your whole argument is about theory, and yet you are saying gravity does not exist. Surely the non-existence of gravity is just as much a theory (albeit a weak one) as the existence of gravity, and therefore you can't really say in absolute terms gravity doesn't exist...
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    (Original post by schoolstudent)
    don't bother
    have a nap instead...then decide on a different subject at uni
    something INTERESTING where the information you're given can really be thought about and connected in interesting ways e.g. physics. i'd imagine (and from what i've seen of textbooks/what i've i've heard) that medicine is just memorising dead, boringly-connected facts facts and knowledge. physics will give you the chance to really think-each new idea you learn about will open up new possibilities. seriously, your thoughts will be far more entertaining if you don't do medicine. physics feels far more "living" to me...it opens up worlds of thought and interesting questions.
    As amazing as physics is, you would have to concede that "interesting" is a subjective term, and the fact that physics is much, much more undersubscribed than a lot of subjects might insinuate that it's not that interesting to most people. Although there are probably other reasons, i.e. the maths or the complexity.

    I agree that the content in physics is incredible, but that doesn't mean the next person will agree. Also medicine is very interesting and there is an increasing amount of crossover; biomedical physics. It's funny how dead, boringly-connected facts save lives on a daily, no hourly, no minutely, no secondly, etc etc, basis.
 
 
 
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