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    Ok I have a pretty strong dislike for mathematics. I find it tedious, frustrating and it can be hard. I put in minimal effort in my maths at further maths lessons at college and do next to no homework or exam revision. But somehow, I've still got A's in every module so far include a few 100%'s, so naturally I've applied to uni for maths. I was rejected from oxford, but have offers from imperial, bath, bristol and warwick. I've only applied really because I have no idea what else I'd do, my other A levels are Physics and Music. Careers in music are non-existent and Physics is even worse than Maths.

    What do i do? I think I'd love to go to London, but am scared of missing my A in every module no resits allowed part of my offer, as further pure 2 & 3 are pretty hard. The 3 A's bit should be ok though, but even if I somehow work my socks of to get my grades in FP2/3, I can see myself just gambling my student loan and try to enjoy London and the whole student life. Meanwhile, failing my degree, or at least its a possibility, the thought of 35-40 hours of maths a week is revolting. HELP.
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    Jesus...don't do it!! Have you tried work experience in different kind of careers?

    Check this out....
    http://www.connexions-direct.com/jobs4u/
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    Take a gap year to figure out what you want. You need to find something you are passionate about, and if you have good grades you'll be in a good position to choose where you want to be and what you want to do.
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    Just get out of it.
    That is what I did although not at the same level, at GCSE I ignored my teacher for two years listened to music throughout the lessons and got an A* everyone expected me to continue at A level and further but I just couldn't face, it was never challenging enough so I lost interest and became bored far too quickly. Do something you'll be happy doing, then work out the technicalities...well that is what I'm doing anyway
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    do an access course for something else. its only a year.
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    Maths at uni is very different to maths at A level. Everyone I know doing maths thinks it's much more interesting and enjoyable when you get to uni-level maths, it's a lot less tedious and repetitive, though is of course more difficult.

    http://www.maa.org/devlin/LockhartsLament.pdf explains what I mean quite well, I think.
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    From somebody who has made the error of going to university to study a course I wasn't sure about, my advice would be don't do it. If you need any advice, PM me.
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    Much as I ADORE London, even I couldn't put up with 35-40 hours of Maths a week for it. Good luck, but don't do maths if you hate it, it's just not worth it!!
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    I'd agree with those that have recommended a gap year. There are plenty of other options for you at university e.g. Law or Economics. Don't feel that you're limited to your three A level options.
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    Maybe I don't hate maths, but I certainly don't enjoy it. But the thought of a gap year is equally scary. Firstly my parents would kill me, my friends, college teachers, no-one would understand, I'm just being pushed from all directions to go to uni and haven't stopped to think if its what I want. But it does seem to be the commonsense thing to do even if I'm not 100% passionate about my course. I mean what would I do on a gap year? Work? The thought of ever getting part-time work is bad enough let alone a 9-5, not to mention 99% of jobs would leave me unfulfilled and I can't even list the 1% that I'd be happy doing anyway, I'm just assuming some exist. So I'm lazy, ok.

    The only things I actually enjoy are poker, jazz, hockey and then maths is borderline bearable. Stupid as it sounds the only thing I can ever see myself doing is becoming a professional poker player. Hockey is just a get away and a short term release. Jazz earns me like £75 a month on average atm from gigging, and I enjoy it, but I've already kind of hit a ceiling with my music and rehearse every night of the week already and fancy toning my music down and trying something new.

    Basically, if I took a gap year, I'd have to get a job in the gap year, how else could I justify it? And even then I can't see myself suddenly seeing the light, or being in a better position next year. I'm not suddenly going to find something I want to do that I haven't already experienced and already considered. As already stated the only thing I'm actually passionate about is poker, and I'm good. And have the potential to learn, some people do make a living from gambling why can't I? But for obvious reasons this is not a preferable ambition to be focussing on, lifestyle, emotional detachment, mood swings, addiction etc etc. But unless I suddenly spot a magic solution I see myself seeing this year out at college, if I manage A's in all modules then I'll hit Imperial, if not then I'll go to Bristol. Although its not perfect, at least a maths degree gives me some qualification if I ever get myself into trouble.

    Bezzler, I'm just having a read now...
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    (Original post by Josh Jones)
    Ok I have a pretty strong dislike for mathematics. I find it tedious, frustrating and it can be hard. I put in minimal effort in my maths at further maths lessons at college and do next to no homework or exam revision. But somehow, I've still got A's in every module so far include a few 100%'s, so naturally I've applied to uni for maths. I was rejected from oxford, but have offers from imperial, bath, bristol and warwick. I've only applied really because I have no idea what else I'd do, my other A levels are Physics and Music. Careers in music are non-existent and Physics is even worse than Maths.

    What do i do? I think I'd love to go to London, but am scared of missing my A in every module no resits allowed part of my offer, as further pure 2 & 3 are pretty hard. The 3 A's bit should be ok though, but even if I somehow work my socks of to get my grades in FP2/3, I can see myself just gambling my student loan and try to enjoy London and the whole student life. Meanwhile, failing my degree, or at least its a possibility, the thought of 35-40 hours of maths a week is revolting. HELP.
    Not if you know anything about the music industry.

    Just don't do it. You will only be wasting your own time if you do. What do degrees in maths get you? Careers in maths. Not exactly your ideal job.

    I think you should do a gap year - do some voluntary work, travel or get a job for a year, find something you're passionate about and study that instead.
    Why did you even take maths if you dislike it that much??
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    (Original post by JW92)
    I'd agree with those that have recommended a gap year. There are plenty of other options for you at university e.g. Law or Economics. Don't feel that you're limited to your three A level options.
    As stated above a gap year doesn't really solve things on its own, unless I'd already decided I really wanted to do saw Law or Economics. But I've not really had any experience of economics, and am not particularly interested in it. Besides that just leads me even more toward an investment banker/finance style of job, which to be successful at require a hell of a lot of time, effort and to a certain extent passion.

    I have a 34 year old brother who got a 1st in Chemistry then did a law conversion course, but again I'm not really that good at English, or interested in Law. But if I suddenly became passionate I could just do a conversion course anyway after uni. Besides a maths place at imperial is too good to turn down? I can't see myself being put in a better position but don't know what to do.
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    I dislike both Maths & Physics... but you should see my TSL Forum profile info

    If you can bare the boredom of the course then it's a good qualification to have, since most graduates don't go into jobs which are related to their degree - so you don't need to worry about committing to maths for the rest of your life. Employers see it as an impressive achievement and that's all that's important.

    As far as getting through Uni goes, just find other extra curricular things to do. I LOVED Uni, even though I hated my course. I mostly ignored my actual degree work up until the few weeks preceding the exams each year. The rest of my time was spent doing stuff I actually enjoyed. As we used to say; "Don't let your degree get in the way of your education"!
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    (Original post by popcornmaster)
    Just get out of it.
    That is what I did although not at the same level, at GCSE I ignored my teacher for two years listened to music throughout the lessons and got an A* everyone expected me to continue at A level and further but I just couldn't face, it was never challenging enough so I lost interest and became bored far too quickly. Do something you'll be happy doing, then work out the technicalities...well that is what I'm doing anyway
    I kind of felt the same after GCSE but I did A level anyway (for some reason) ... and I loved it!

    (Original post by Ranana girl)
    What do degrees in maths get you? Careers in maths. Not exactly your ideal job.
    But that's simply not true. I mean, yes, you can get careers in maths, but you can get careers in other things as well. Maths is a great degree for showing how brainy someone is - a maths grad is going to be pretty employable. Not that I'm saying the OP should definitely go to uni, but it's something to bear in mind.

    OP, what about other subjects like psychology? Or if you did something like natural sciences you could mix and match. Seeing as maths is the only degree subject you seem to find bearable (in theory), though, maybe you should give it a go and see how you find it. You can always transfer course if you hate it.
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    (Original post by Rananagirl)
    Not if you know anything about the music industry.

    Just don't do it. You will only be wasting your own time if you do. What do degrees in maths get you? Careers in maths. Not exactly your ideal job.

    I think you should do a gap year - do some voluntary work, travel or get a job for a year, find something you're passionate about and study that instead.
    Why did you even take maths if you dislike it that much??
    Well I play the trombone, and am into jazz. If you know anything about getting a job as a trombone player, even in London, you would understand. There are so many high standard players coming out of music colleges each year that any full time playing position has over 100 applicants per spot, then your put through rigorous auditions and the best rise to the top, of which compared to the best, (eg. Mark Nightingale, or Gordon Cambell) I'm nothing. Not too mention its not well paid. And all I like about music is playing, so any admin music related job would suck.

    And I didn't dislike it at school, it was easy at school, and the patterns and things involved used to fascinate me, but I have no underlying interest in it now whatsoever, my A levels just seem like a means to an end. To get to uni, where I hope I can enjoy myself, earn a little on the side from part time playing trombone in london/poker, both of which I enjoy anyway. And then do the bare minimum to get a 2/1.
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    If you hate something, you're probably just going to end up dropping out.
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    (Original post by Chwirkytheappleboy)
    I dislike both Maths & Physics... but you should see my TSL Forum profile info

    If you can bare the boredom of the course then it's a good qualification to have, since most graduates don't go into jobs which are related to their degree - so you don't need to worry about committing to maths for the rest of your life. Employers see it as an impressive achievement and that's all that's important.

    As far as getting through Uni goes, just find other extra curricular things to do. I LOVED Uni, even though I hated my course. I mostly ignored my actual degree work up until the few weeks preceding the exams each year. The rest of my time was spent doing stuff I actually enjoyed. As we used to say; "Don't let your degree get in the way of your education"!
    I agree, this is my thinking atm. Bear the degree, and do as much jazz, poker and hockey as possible.
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    (Original post by KandyKouture)
    If you hate something, you're probably just going to end up dropping out.
    This kind of is a possibility. But more likely if I totally hated the whole experience but if I'm good at maths, then bearing it isn't my worst option as I don't know what else to do? And I can still enjoy myself by focussing on extra curricular?
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    (Original post by Josh Jones)
    As stated above a gap year doesn't really solve things on its own, unless I'd already decided I really wanted to do saw Law or Economics. But I've not really had any experience of economics, and am not particularly interested in it. Besides that just leads me even more toward an investment banker/finance style of job, which to be successful at require a hell of a lot of time, effort and to a certain extent passion.

    I have a 34 year old brother who got a 1st in Chemistry then did a law conversion course, but again I'm not really that good at English, or interested in Law. But if I suddenly became passionate I could just do a conversion course anyway after uni. Besides a maths place at imperial is too good to turn down? I can't see myself being put in a better position but don't know what to do.
    Tricky situation! I'm just looking at the Bristol prospectus and it lists the different degrees you can do with certain A levels and ones you can do with non-specific A levels and there are far too many courses to list them here. So, I'd shop around. You're not constrained to Physics/Maths/Music. You'd be better taking a gap year (or doing Music if that's what you enjoy!) than hating your course at Imperial and dropping out with debt.
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    (Original post by Josh Jones)
    Ok I have a pretty strong dislike for mathematics. I find it tedious, frustrating and it can be hard. I put in minimal effort in my maths at further maths lessons at college and do next to no homework or exam revision. But somehow, I've still got A's in every module so far include a few 100%'s, so naturally I've applied to uni for maths. I was rejected from oxford, but have offers from imperial, bath, bristol and warwick. I've only applied really because I have no idea what else I'd do, my other A levels are Physics and Music. Careers in music are non-existent and Physics is even worse than Maths.

    What do i do? I think I'd love to go to London, but am scared of missing my A in every module no resits allowed part of my offer, as further pure 2 & 3 are pretty hard. The 3 A's bit should be ok though, but even if I somehow work my socks of to get my grades in FP2/3, I can see myself just gambling my student loan and try to enjoy London and the whole student life. Meanwhile, failing my degree, or at least its a possibility, the thought of 35-40 hours of maths a week is revolting. HELP.


    Business? Economics? You clearly have the right A-Levels and grades to apply for those courses and they have a strong focus on maths so you'd evidently do well anddd it'd be a little more interesting. PLUS, it'd give you nice options for when you're older?
 
 
 
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