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    By the sounds of it I'd probably stick with making your uni choices and trying to meet you offer for Imperial as that's the one you prefer. This way you push your decision another 6 months - you can just tell unis in August you no longer wish to go there (or wish to defer your offer, which they'll normall let you do).

    It seems like you're good at maths, but have never had to work much to get good results and don't wish to work too hard with it either; a degree in maths will mean you have to put in work to pass, but with a lot of ability and attending lectures etc. it is presumably 'easier' than a degree where you need to read lots of books and learn facts.

    Personally I think looking at a gap year is a good idea, but if you can't think of anything to do then it's not a good idea; no point in sitting at home doing nothing or working in Tesco's 9-5 and hating that... I'm not saying you should, but if you're good enough at poker you could play that during a gap year as well. (I play a bit for fun as well, and I know of quite a few mathmos that do so)

    As said above, university maths is a bit different to A-level. The thing most like university maths that you can meet at this level I'd say is STEP questions.
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    Gap year?
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    Quick, branch off into physics. We need you! : )
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    Just do it. In time you will learn to love it.
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    If you end up going to Imperial, doing a subject you barely like, having to do those ridiculous hours.....you'll live to regret it OP.

    For the sake of your sanity - do something you love - don't have your head solely on the career prospects.
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    Mathematics at university is very different to how you are finding the subject at school. If you harbour a strong dislike for it, then I recommend you do not pursue the subject at University.
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    Three choices:
    a) Maths at university might become very enjoyable for you: you're around professors who love their subject and you're mingling with students who are passionate about Maths. Teaching styles will also be different and you will be introduced to other sides of Maths that you may not have met in high school and may end up loving at university.
    b) You could go to university and ask to switch courses if you still don't think maths is for you when you're there.
    c) Take a gap year (only if you know exactly what subject you would prefer to study)
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    Do it. If you hate maths and you're great at it, imagine how good you'll be at something you'll enjoy?
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    (Original post by Josh Jones)
    and Music. Careers in music are non-existent and Physics is even worse than Maths.
    check this guy and this guy[early life section]..
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    You dont know what to do, your influenced by your parents, and you fear that which you havent tried, a gap year.

    I think its hard for you to argument "What could i possibly do in a gap year" what couldnt you do in a gap year, plan out travelling, special work, developing as a person, becoming more independent, whatever just do something with your time but most importantly of all.

    You should take a Gap year because clearly you dont know what you want to do, and you expect the idea to fall from the sky and enlighten you, it wont, you will have to research every career you find attractive, what education it entails, write down the plusses and minusses and investigate it.

    Once you finally have considered for a longer period what career choice fits you best you might finally revel.

    Do Not Start ANY course simply because "what else should i do?" and rush head first into a university degree. If it comes to either starting a degree while uncertain, or slowing down the tempo for one year to ascertain with yourself what you want, i hope you realize it is better to make the right choice for your own pleasure early on, do not rush it, it is hard.
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    stick to what you love doing, seriously.
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    (Original post by popcornmaster)
    Just get out of it.
    That is what I did although not at the same level, at GCSE I ignored my teacher for two years listened to music throughout the lessons and got an A* everyone expected me to continue at A level and further but I just couldn't face, it was never challenging enough so I lost interest and became bored far too quickly. Do something you'll be happy doing, then work out the technicalities...well that is what I'm doing anyway
    well you just weren't stretching yourself enough in maths...you could've made it challenging and interesting for yourself. obviously a gcse isn't going to be a challenge or force you to see the interesting side to maths. you should've done what some pupils of your ability do and looked beyond your gcse/a level work and made your goal an understanding of maths, instead of an exam pass. You'd never have been unchallenged certainly. did questions never occur to you that you couldn't answer immediately? if you'd stuck with trying to find answers to these questions and make sense of mathematics overall, you might have found more to be interested in.
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    (Original post by schoolstudent)
    well you just weren't stretching yourself enough in maths...you could've made it challenging and interesting for yourself. obviously a gcse isn't going to be a challenge or force you to see the interesting side to maths. you should've done what some pupils of your ability do and looked beyond your gcse/a level work and made your goal an understanding of maths, instead of an exam pass. You'd never have been unchallenged certainly. did questions never occur to you that you couldn't answer immediately? if you'd stuck with trying to find answers to these questions and make sense of mathematics overall, you might have found more to be interested in.
    I really couldn't, my school had no infrastructure when it came to stretching maths students or advancing them at a quicker pace (This was possible in Languages, or at least it was for me, in English and in PE). Obviously I could have done all this in my own time which I used to do, but at that point I'd already lost all motivation. At that level no there was nothing that I wasn't able to answer with relative easy, but no doubt this would have changed had I continued. I know that having a larger grasp of the more abstract side of mathematics would interest me but I'm much happier studying Philosophy, as it includes the logic I used to enjoy from maths without (for me at least) any of the negatives.
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    (Original post by Josh Jones)
    Maybe I don't hate maths, but I certainly don't enjoy it. But the thought of a gap year is equally scary. Firstly my parents would kill me, my friends, college teachers, no-one would understand, I'm just being pushed from all directions to go to uni and haven't stopped to think if its what I want. But it does seem to be the commonsense thing to do even if I'm not 100% passionate about my course. I mean what would I do on a gap year? Work? The thought of ever getting part-time work is bad enough let alone a 9-5, not to mention 99% of jobs would leave me unfulfilled and I can't even list the 1% that I'd be happy doing anyway, I'm just assuming some exist. So I'm lazy, ok.

    The only things I actually enjoy are poker, jazz, hockey and then maths is borderline bearable. Stupid as it sounds the only thing I can ever see myself doing is becoming a professional poker player. Hockey is just a get away and a short term release. Jazz earns me like £75 a month on average atm from gigging, and I enjoy it, but I've already kind of hit a ceiling with my music and rehearse every night of the week already and fancy toning my music down and trying something new.

    Basically, if I took a gap year, I'd have to get a job in the gap year, how else could I justify it? And even then I can't see myself suddenly seeing the light, or being in a better position next year. I'm not suddenly going to find something I want to do that I haven't already experienced and already considered. As already stated the only thing I'm actually passionate about is poker, and I'm good. And have the potential to learn, some people do make a living from gambling why can't I? But for obvious reasons this is not a preferable ambition to be focussing on, lifestyle, emotional detachment, mood swings, addiction etc etc. But unless I suddenly spot a magic solution I see myself seeing this year out at college, if I manage A's in all modules then I'll hit Imperial, if not then I'll go to Bristol. Although its not perfect, at least a maths degree gives me some qualification if I ever get myself into trouble.

    Bezzler, I'm just having a read now...
    what stakes?
    pm me your sn, i need a sweat partner. on gap year atm
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    (Original post by popcornmaster)
    I really couldn't, my school had no infrastructure when it came to stretching maths students or advancing them at a quicker pace (This was possible in Languages, or at least it was for me, in English and in PE). Obviously I could have done all this in my own time which I used to do, but at that point I'd already lost all motivation. At that level no there was nothing that I wasn't able to answer with relative easy, but no doubt this would have changed had I continued. I know that having a larger grasp of the more abstract side of mathematics would interest me but I'm much happier studying Philosophy, as it includes the logic I used to enjoy from maths without (for me at least) any of the negatives.
    Do you mean out of your GCSE exam?
    Or could you answer every question which occurred to you? As an example, you must have learned about how to solve ax^2+bx+c=0...did you wonder about ax^3+bx^2+cx+d=0 ? did you come to an answer? There are so many questions like that which you could ask/come up with pretty easily/quickly and think about with only a gcse knowledge

    I'm not sure if that's a good example, but did you think about how you'd solve that? Did you try to work it out for yourself?
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    (Original post by schoolstudent)
    Do you mean out of your GCSE exam?
    Or could you answer every question which occurred to you? Did you never wonder about things which were slightly beyond what was in your book
    As an example, you must have learned about how to solve ax^2+bx+c=0...did you not wonder about ax^3+bx^2+cx+d=0 ? There are so many questions like that which you could ask/come up with pretty easily/quickly and think about with only a gcse knowledge

    I'm not sure if that's a good example, but did you not wonder about how you'd solve that? Did you try to work it out for yourself? Did you never ask bigger questions and stick with them?
    You do bring up valid points, and I admire that you're so passionate about the subject. I could have done all them things but my boredom of maths began in year 8, prior to that I had always gone ahead worked above and beyond the current textbook, asked all the bigger questions on the relative level of course. I used to blame loss of passion on my teacher seemingly spoon feeding everyone in the 'top set' group but I'm not sure if that was even it, I think I'd just over done it exhausted my tolerance. From year 8 it just degraded by GCSE I stood no chance when it came to self motivation.
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    Ok, OP, as someone who has kinda been down this road before I advise you don't do it. I was going to do econ and german because they're good for the career I had in mind, fortunately I didnt get the grades because while I don't mind the subjects they don't inspire anywhere near the same enthusiasm in me as Maths(my personal fave). You should really pick a subject you enjoy.

    I saw you mentioned econ and I study that, while it can lead to finance, investment banker stuff they aren't your only choices, that said I can't give you many other ideas considering they were the reasons I wanted to an econ degree. I wouldnt say you needed a passion to study it, it's good if it excites you. That said, find someone at your college who does econ and ask them about it.

    Look through a prospectus, cross out the ones you can't get onto, the ones that sound boring etc and choose a couple you do like and talk to people who study those subjects. Oh and call UCAS
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    (Original post by Josh Jones)
    But. As subjects they are a little less respected as subjects, I don't find them any more interesting than maths anyway. And would require a gap year to reapply which seems likes a waste of time as I don't know what I'd do and am too lazy to arrange to travel or anything. Options wise you can get any job with a maths degree that you could get with a buis/eco degree, so not as if its loads more options. Finally, an offer from imperial college is too good to turn down so better to bite the bullet and accept that i'm not passionate about my subject.

    That's fair enough, I agree. Maybe take different electives to make your course a little more interesting? Focus on loads of extra-curricular stuff too that'll look good on your CV, open a few more doors and interest you more. You've got your head screwed on, you're going to do well so just try to make your 3 years a little more interesting. Good luck!
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    You are also assuming that you'll be good at uni maths, since you find A level easy. This is often not the case and you'll have to work hard at uni-- this you won't be able to do if you can't bear the subject. I think you should gap regardless of family pressure etc. You're a young adult now, time to make your choices. The alternative is a recipe for disaster.
 
 
 
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