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    Hey, I am considering Edinburgh as a serious choice for studying Law in 2010. Recently my friend told me that Edinburgh wasn't very good for feedback, so I did some research about it. According to "The Guardian University guide 2010", Edinburgh has the lowest percentage for satisfied feedback.

    Is this a serious issue to be concerned about?:confused:

    Thanks
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    Was kind of wondering about that myself; especially seeing as I know a few(3) people currently in their first year of Law at Edinburgh and they're having an AMAZING time, two of them rejected what would be considered "higher ranked" universities(KCL & Durham) for Edinburgh and according to them they havent regretted it for a second.

    Any Edinburgh Law students care to chime in on their opinions of the course/city? Youd be of great assistance
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    I saw that as well but if you look at the table no university has anything really above 75%
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    All depends on the tutor, lecturer, course, school and college. Possibly depends how much effort you put into getting more information if you feel it necessary (lecturers are usually happy to dicuss it during their office hours).

    I suppose the general low figures might be skewed by our experiences at school (in terms of homework being marked quickly, mistakes pointed out) whereas at University lecturers have other courses and their day jobs to get on with. Can take a couple of weeks to get essays back and they may contain no more than the mark.

    In my experience, the lack of feedback was more of an annoyance rather than a dealbreaker. It's supposed to be getting better. But it gives the student union something to moan about anyway!
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    The union academic officers are devoting a significant amount of attention to the problem. Part of the issue is that some university work has to be marked by an external examiner (borderline marks, all firsts, all fails), and everyone gets their work back at the same time. It varies quite a bit from one department to another--the School of History, Classics and Archaeology has always given thorough and thoughtful feedback on essays in the courses I've taken. The School of Social and Political Studies is really mixed, and it varies a lot depending on the tutor. I have also heard a relatively senior history lecturer say that tutors who have taught in SSPS have to be taught to mark again before they can mark history work properly. I can't comment on law feedback specifically. I do know a number of people on the last year of the course (including one who's studying as a graduate after doing history) who had uniformly good things to say about the law faculty. Also, after four years studying here I was happy to apply (and considered staying to study) law--it was my second choice.

    I wouldn't be too discouraged by the feedback. I would encourage you, however, to look carefully into how much written work you do. We do far too little in history and politics, and it's a significant shortcoming. (It is one of a variety of reasons why I want to study law at Cambridge when I finish here--you write many, many more assignments each term.)
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    (Original post by jjarvis)
    The union academic officers are devoting a significant amount of attention to the problem. Part of the issue is that some university work has to be marked by an external examiner (borderline marks, all firsts, all fails), and everyone gets their work back at the same time. It varies quite a bit from one department to another--the School of History, Classics and Archaeology has always given thorough and thoughtful feedback on essays in the courses I've taken. The School of Social and Political Studies is really mixed, and it varies a lot depending on the tutor. I have also heard a relatively senior history lecturer say that tutors who have taught in SSPS have to be taught to mark again before they can mark history work properly. I can't comment on law feedback specifically. I do know a number of people on the last year of the course (including one who's studying as a graduate after doing history) who had uniformly good things to say about the law faculty. Also, after four years studying here I was happy to apply (and considered staying to study) law--it was my second choice.

    I wouldn't be too discouraged by the feedback. I would encourage you, however, to look carefully into how much written work you do. We do far too little in history and politics, and it's a significant shortcoming. (It is one of a variety of reasons why I want to study law at Cambridge when I finish here--you write many, many more assignments each term.)
    I applied for Hpol at Edinburgh.

    Still got my fingers crossed as I'll be hearing before the 26. Feb.
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    These satisfaction scores are the most faked statistics going. Don't believe them at all.
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    It's a real problem, and no doubt it'll be worst pre-Honours. I've had some ok feedback from Marion Schmid, my French tutor, but my philosophy and Spanish essays have had next to nothing by way of feedback. It seems tutors don't assume you want to push above a 2.1 in the 1st year.
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    (Original post by ExDeusVenitBritannia)
    It's a real problem, and no doubt it'll be worst pre-Honours. I've had some ok feedback from Marion Schmid, my French tutor, but my philosophy and Spanish essays have had next to nothing by way of feedback. It seems tutors don't assume you want to push above a 2.1 in the 1st year.
    My main problem with Spanish essays/assessments is I have to sit there for half an hour trying to decipher all of the scribbles and work out what my feedback actually is. Who do you have, anyway?
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    (Original post by Gordon_pk)
    Hey, I am considering Edinburgh as a serious choice for studying Law in 2010. Recently my friend told me that Edinburgh wasn't very good for feedback, so I did some research about it. According to "The Guardian University guide 2010", Edinburgh has the lowest percentage for satisfied feedback.

    Is this a serious issue to be concerned about?:confused:

    Thanks
    There was a reason for this but i can't remember what it was.
    I personally LOVE it here and have zero regrets. We're like a big family in pollock halls.
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    (Original post by Static.)
    My main problem with Spanish essays/assessments is I have to sit there for half an hour trying to decipher all of the scribbles and work out what my feedback actually is. Who do you have, anyway?
    José S. I always forget his surname, is it Salvas or something?

    Yeah, he's pretty much interested in doing the bare minimum of teaching. Group work for 40mins with people who haven't read the book, then 10mins sharing the group's ideas with other groups that haven't read the book, with next to no input from José. His job must be so cushy!

    Who's yours? And who do you think is the best choice for next year?
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    (Original post by ExDeusVenitBritannia)
    José S. I always forget his surname, is it Salvas or something?

    Yeah, he's pretty much interested in doing the bare minimum of teaching. Group work for 40mins with people who haven't read the book, then 10mins sharing the group's ideas with other groups that haven't read the book, with next to no input from José. His job must be so cushy!

    Who's yours? And who do you think is the best choice for next year?
    Ahh, he's my DoS! (his name's Saval, incidentally)

    I have Sergi Mainer. I like him (and literature seminars are about the only thing I actually enjoy about Spanish to be honest) but whether I'll actually be doing Spanish or not next year is another thing. I'm actually in the process of switching my degree, although I've been told I might have to continue Spanish into second year anyway.
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    (Original post by Static.)
    although I've been told I might have to continue Spanish into second year anyway.
    Oh no, why?
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    (Original post by nearlyheadlessian)
    Oh no, why?
    Because (his words, not mine) Spanish and English Lit is a really popular degree, and since they had to reject a lot of people to give me a place I can't officially change until the end of second year (or I would at least have to keep taking Spanish as an outside subject). Well, he said he was going to double-check that and get back to me, actually, so I don't know 100% yet.
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    (Original post by Static.)
    Because (his words, not mine) Spanish and English Lit is a really popular degree, and since they had to reject a lot of people to give me a place I can't officially change until the end of second year (or I would at least have to keep taking Spanish as an outside subject). Well, he said he was going to double-check that and get back to me, actually, so I don't know 100% yet.
    Sounds like total ******** to me. I suggest you get Alan or Gunilla to pick a fight if they try that on. It's not like you're trying to drop English Lit (which is, after all, the popular component)... One way around it would simply be to take 4 courses in 2nd year, and not turn up to Spanish. Serves them right. Stupid dos of yours - the whole point of the system is to allow flexibility.
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    (Original post by Static.)
    Because (his words, not mine) Spanish and English Lit is a really popular degree, and since they had to reject a lot of people to give me a place I can't officially change until the end of second year (or I would at least have to keep taking Spanish as an outside subject). Well, he said he was going to double-check that and get back to me, actually, so I don't know 100% yet.
    Thats bull as you can change your degree whenever you want seeing as its the whole point of the system!! It doesn't matter at all whether you do it in second year or not, its not as if they can change the fact they rejected other people in favour of you now. Just fill out the change of degree transfer form anyway!

    Second year Spanish is haaaaaaaaaaaaaaard, I say don't do it
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    Thanks guys. If my DoS refuses to let me drop Spanish/change my degree before second year, I'll just quote you both.
    (Original post by nearlyheadlessian)
    I suggest you get Alan or Gunilla to pick a fight if they try that on.
    Or that.
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    (Original post by Static.)
    Thanks guys. If my DoS refuses to let me drop Spanish/change my degree before second year, I'll just quote you both.

    Or that.
    He's a Spanish lecturer. He's biased. If you said you'd drop another subject he'd be ok with it.

    In other news, the Spanish department is maxed out of cash and they have 20-30% more students than they should have, so he should be telling you it's fine for you to change.
 
 
 
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