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Same Tuition Fees For ALL Unis - Is This Fair? watch

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    I just had a quick thought.

    This year, I've applied for medicine. If some of you aren't aware, after one has studied medicine at graduate, one is almost guranteed a job. What's more, when one applies for their job, the university attended is omitted from the application form. Thus, in terms of finance, it doesn't matter where one goes to study medicine. Initially, a graduate from Cambridge will be on the same money as a graduate from Keele, for example.

    However, for most other degrees, it is not such a smooth transition. For example, most graduates who enter the Investment Banking (IB) sector study economics at university. From reading many TSR threads, it's clear that IB Banks primarily concern themselves with grads from the 'elite' universities.. Oxbridge/LSE/Durham/UCL/ Imperial. (We are all aware of the £££s that IB Bankers make)

    Thus, what about an economic grad from a 'lesser' uni. It more likely that they'll know get into the IB Sector and thus wont have access to the £££s that one can make from the sector.

    Thus, my question is, isit fair that two people will pay the same university fees, when arguably their future careers prospects will bear them signficantly different fianical rewards.

    Btw, I have no opinion.. I'm merely curious
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    In one way its fair, the uni's are already being exclusive based on the quality of applicants, surely someone who's amazing, but from a poorer background shouldnt be denied due to not having enough money..

    In the other way, it isnt, you're recieving a greater education, and thats what you're paying for- education. so why should those who go to the best and worst pay the same?

    The system isnt ridiculously unfair because the uni's don't lose out THAT much the way it is, and the students get the benefits, whereas some students would lose out big time if it weren't how it is.

    So overall i think it could be improved but is better than a lot of alternatives.
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    (Original post by Futurdoc)
    I just had a quick thought.

    This year, I've applied for medicine. If some of you aren't aware, after one has studied medicine at graduate, one is almost guranteed a job. What's more, when one applies for their job, the university attended is omitted from the application form. Thus, in terms of finance, it doesn't matter where one goes to study medicine. Initially, a graduate from Cambridge will be on the same money as a graduate from Keele, for example.

    However, for most other degrees, it is not such a smooth transition. For example, most graduates who enter the Investment Banking (IB) sector study economics at university. From reading many TSR threads, it's clear that IB Banks primarily concern themselves with grads from the 'elite' universities.. Oxbridge/LSE/Durham/UCL/ Imperial. (We are all aware of the £££s that IB Bankers make)

    Thus, what about an economic grad from a 'lesser' uni. It more likely that they'll know get into the IB Sector and thus wont have access to the £££s that one can make from the sector.

    Thus, my question is, isit fair that two people will pay the same university fees, when arguably their future careers prospects will bear them signficantly different fianical rewards.

    Btw, I have no opinion.. I'm merely curious

    Eh? how does this work?

    & I don't like the way you seem to suggest that Economics is the only route into IB- Business and Accounting and Finance graduates also get into IB- sometimes Teir 1.

    & Finally- Yes it is fair. People make informed decisions for the most part, and not everyone goes to uni to further their career prospects- some just love to learn .
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    Yes

    /thread
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    double posted, delete this one please. Sorry!
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    (Original post by jjackson18624)
    Eh? how does this work?

    & I don't like the way you seem to suggest that Economics is the only route into IB- Business and Accounting and Finance graduates also get into IB- sometimes Teir 1.

    & Finally- Yes it is fair. People make informed decisions for the most part, and not everyone goes to uni to further their career prospects- some just love to learn .
    Whether that's true or not, graduates from those subjects have better prospects if they're from Oxford than from a 'lesser' uni, so the argument doesn't change at all really.

    And even if people only go to uni because they "love to learn", you probably learn less at a 'lesser' uni than at a very intensive uni like Oxford or ICL, so again the same argument holds up.


    edit:
    (Original post by i.am.lost)
    Yes

    /thread
    From your sig;
    I will be inactive on TSR as of March 1st for a period of four months.

    With posting like that, how will we cope without you..?!
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    See: http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=1182560

    Universities do charge different fees; the government heavily subsidises them so that we all pay the same flat rate though. See non-UK student fees, for example.
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    (Original post by M_E_X)
    Whether that's true or not, graduates from those subjects have better prospects if they're from Oxford than from a 'lesser' uni, so the argument doesn't change at all really.

    And even if people only go to uni because they "love to learn", you probably learn less at a 'lesser' uni than at a very intensive uni like Oxford or ICL, so again the same argument holds up.


    edit:

    From your sig;
    I will be inactive on TSR as of March 1st for a period of four months.

    With posting like that, how will we cope without you..?!
    Yes, I agree, of course there will be better prospects the more prestigous the university you attend.

    And keep in mind Oxbridge doesn't offer every course- oxford for one only offers Economics and Management, not just Economics or Business seperate. If someone wanted to focus on marketing for example they couldn't do this at Oxbrdige so arguably they'd be learning less about what they love..lol. IDK what else they don't offer but you get the picture. I'm trying to avoid saying 'Media studies' :lol:
    • Thread Starter
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    I acknowledge that argument that some people go to university to pursue a subject they are interested in. What's more, I personally encourage this.

    However, is it fair that people invest the same amount of money, buh Person A could be on 100K + Bonuses and Person B is on 35K.

    Or, shall we point the finger at the work done in school & sixth form ? Shall we blame the individuals who didn't work hard enough ?
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    (Original post by M_E_X)
    From your sig;
    I will be inactive on TSR as of March 1st for a period of four months.
    With posting like that, how will we cope without you..?!
    loool :rofl:

    you'll live.. somehow.
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    (Original post by M_E_X)
    Whether that's true or not, graduates from those subjects have better prospects if they're from Oxford than from a 'lesser' uni, so the argument doesn't change at all really.

    And even if people only go to uni because they "love to learn", you probably learn less at a 'lesser' uni than at a very intensive uni like Oxford or ICL, so again the same argument holds up.


    edit:

    From your sig;
    I will be inactive on TSR as of March 1st for a period of four months.

    With posting like that, how will we cope without you..?!


    lol that made me laugh at the end
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    On the one hand, I think that it's great how someone can go to Oxbridge, two of the most highly regarded universities globally for the same price as any other university in the UK.

    However, there are some courses that really are not worth the money when you think about it. Some courses [think Surf Science, Sports Journalism et al] could be done part time, or in a year or two yet some universities are charging students over 10K over three years which imo is tantamount to fraud.
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    (Original post by jjackson18624)
    Eh? how does this work?
    Thats how it works in medicine when applying for foundation jobs.
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    (Original post by Futurdoc)
    Thus, my question is, isit fair that two people will pay the same university fees, when arguably their future careers prospects will bear them signficantly different fianical rewards.
    Yes. Your fees pay for your education, not your future earnings. It doesn't cost any less to educate a person who won't necessarily earn a lot in the future.

    Hello, common sense.
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    Yes but surely fees should coinside with the cost of running the course. At the moment it is those who will earn the least who subsidise the courses of those who are most likely to be earning the most.
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    (Original post by chap54)
    Yes but surely fees should coinside with the cost of running the course. At the moment it is those who will earn the least who subsidise the courses of those who are most likely to be earning the most.
    How is the 'cost of running the course' different for people who earn more/less in the future?
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    Graduates in humanities pay the same fees as students of the sciences. Yet by enlarge science graduates out earn humanities graduates. Despite science courses and departments being more expensive to run.
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    (Original post by cardine92)

    However, there are some courses that really are not worth the money when you think about it. Some courses [think Surf Science, Sports Journalism et al] could be done part time, or in a year or two yet some universities are charging students over 10K over three years which imo is tantamount to fraud.

    this is the same for all courses IMO


    how the **** does it cost the uni 3K per year plus what the government makes up for to put a bloke at the front of a lecture theatre for a few hours per day?........and when you consider most of my lectures have about 300+ people in them its daylight robbery
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    It is pretty appauling that even 3k a year is allowed to be charged, given that most of the tuition fees go towards funding postgraduate research / bulky admin / inefficient departments in universities. I don't even think im getting 3k in value when you consider you only really get lectures / seminars and the odd few books taken out of the library.
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    No.

    Getting a degree from a top university for just over £3K a year is an absolute bargain, especially as students receive a loan that is incredibly easy-going and somewhat easy to pay off. My issues are with the universities at the bottom-end of the league tables, where £3K will buy you poor facilities, lecturers that read from Powerpoint presentations provided with the books they tout and very little support. I am of the opinion that education is a service and if students aren't happy with the level of education they are receiving that they shouldn't have to pay (if they don't receive a degree in the end). What infuriates me about such things is that many of the universities at the bottom of the ladder have the money to improve, but they won't!

    I would rather pay three times more for my degree (even if it means having to save up for it) if I were to be guaranteed great facilities, a huge library, freedom to choose whatever extra classes I want (I can't choose certain CompSci subjects on my CompSci degree) and great academic staff. It's the equivalent of saying that a vodka and coke should cost the same in every bar, despite some watering down the vodka or providing the drink in the tiniest plastic cup imaginable.
 
 
 
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