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I think I may have asbergers syndrome watch

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    (Original post by WaltzvWendt)
    Oh ok. Fair enough. Just had the mistaken impression that you may have thought aspergers or bipolar were sane cries for attention and not true illnesses in general. The description of 'illness' and then the following phrase "it's not." threw me off.

    Anyone lucidly questioning their sanity, read the book "Madness and Civilization: The Birth of the Asylum" by Michel Foucault for alternative interpretations of psychology and normality
    Have you guys read The Curious Incident of The Dog in the Night Time or Speed of Dark by Elizabeth Moon? I find they are really insightful.
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    (Original post by AshleyT)
    There's actually two spelling of it smart ass.
    No there isn't. The Austrian physcians name was Asperger and I don't think Asberger is an Anglicised version of it. That said, it's just a typo/common mispronounciation (especially in the US) so it's not suprising is someone accidentally mispells it and they certainly don't deserve mockery.

    (Original post by crazyb)
    It'll change nowt - only label you as being 'different' and make you even more insecure.
    Not necessarily. With a diagnosis some people get a great deal of relief as now they now why they've felt different all their lives. It can also be a gateway to further support (social services, Disabled Students Allowance, cognitive behavioural therapy).

    That said, there are people with Asperger's who don't need a diagnosis or need to feel like they're part of some "Aspie" community and do get on with their lives. But these are usually the more high functionining/mildly affected and don't feel the need to have support or be singled out.

    There is a danger that, for some, they'll start to obsess over a diagnosis and it can damage their lives further. It's just a label at the end of the day. But others find a diagnosis tremendously useful.
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    (Original post by Afrotortina)
    Have you guys read The Curious Incident of The Dog in the Night Time or Speed of Dark by Elizabeth Moon? I find they are really insightful.
    Well, no. I've read a review of 'The Curious Incident...' though. It might be interesting.
    It's annoying to see that many books and films are awful in depicting autism disorders. Maye this is different.
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    (Original post by Demian)
    Well, no. I've read a review of 'The Curious Incident...' though. It may be interesting.
    I found it interesting, as I'm not as severly autistic as the character, and its little things like the colour of cars on the road that freak him out e.g. if he sees 3 red cars in a row, he thinks he'll have a terrible day and will hide inside (I read it ages ago, so can only vaguely remember) but Speed of Dark is a definite recommendation! Read both! :P
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    (Original post by Afrotortina)
    I found it interesting, as I'm not as severly autistic as the character, and its little things like the colour of cars on the road that freak him out e.g. if he sees 3 red cars in a row, he thinks he'll have a terrible day and will hide inside (I read it ages ago, so can only vaguely remember) but Speed of Dark is a definite recommendation! Read both! :P
    Thanks I might just do that. Although the waiting list is really long.
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    Whether or not you have it, does it really matter? Like someone else said, you can't take a magic pill to make it all go away.

    What if you were diagnosed? You'd have an excuse for being the way you are. But also an excuse not to change. If you've gradually become less shy over the years, you can get better; however, if you found out you had Asperger's, you might be like 'oh, that's it then' and stay stuck in the shy rut for the rest of your life. There's a massive price that comes with a label - if someone, especially someone influential like a doctor, labels you (with Asperger's), you live up to it. You're not 'normal' anymore.
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    (Original post by Eclectic Styles)
    I have Aspergers. I know what it's like to have it. And it's not really like how you're describing it at all- apart from maybe 2-3 bits.

    And those 2-3 `bits`, are more applicable to someone who's just a natural (and rather extreme) introverted person, with moderate OCD, an anxiety complex, self-esteem issues, empathy difficulties and just plain poor social awareness.

    No, from reading this post you've written (and kudos to you for writing it), I really don't think you've got Aspergers but more what I've described above. There's a fair few inconsistencies with what can be defined by a diagnosed Asperger and experienced Asperger as Asperger's Syndrome. It's certainly a `subjective` condition, but not as much as people like to think/ponder.

    Then again, this is coming from me (some stranger totally over the Internet!) and this is my perspective based upon what you've written thus far. Since you have come out yourself (which is actually quite brave, in many ways- even though you are not confirmed by psychological diagnosis), I'd be more than glad for you to PM if you want to discuss it with me/rage at my reply/just chat. It'll probably turn out to be a fairly intriguing conversation if it does so happen.

    I would also follow up on wingsofadove and Jelkin's advice, to ease your worries and to try and get a confirmation of whether you `actually` have it or not.

    I also realise that this post may seem confrontational, harsh and unecessarily aggressive in nature, so let me point out that in no way am I trying to `get your goat`, `hack` you off or what ever terminology you use for `irritate` you. And I geuinely am not, so don't take this or any of the above as sarcastic backslash.

    Right, that's my first post on these forums. Who'd have thought it'd be about this?

    Oh, and hello to all who have bothered to read down to the end of this post... :evil:
    Hello

    To the original poster,

    I would have no idea whether you do or don't have asbergers syndrome, but I'm sure a doctor, who can meet you in person would have a much better idea, and can observe how you react with him/others.
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    (Original post by River85)
    No there isn't. The Austrian physcians name was Asperger and I don't think Asberger is an Anglicised version of it. That said, it's just a typo/common mispronounciation (especially in the US) so it's not suprising is someone accidentally mispells it and they certainly don't deserve mockery.



    Not necessarily. With a diagnosis some people get a great deal of relief as now they now why they've felt different all their lives. It can also be a gateway to further support (social services, Disabled Students Allowance, cognitive behavioural therapy).

    That said, there are people with Asperger's who don't need a diagnosis or need to feel like they're part of some "Aspie" community and do get on with their lives. But these are usually the more high functionining/mildly affected and don't feel the need to have support or be singled out.

    There is a danger that, for some, they'll start to obsess over a diagnosis and it can damage their lives further. It's just a label at the end of the day. But others find a diagnosis tremendously useful.
    Yes there are two spellings of it. Asperger i would say is the correct one, however Asbergers at some point was becoming more widely used. When writing letters to the Educational authorities or Doctors, my Mother started to use the 'Asbergers' spelling. And in some important letters back from them the 'Asberger' spelling had also been used in every single spelling of it...it was not a typo.

    And yes, i know all about Hans Aspergers without Wikipedia.

    Also let me comment...I know A LOT of Aspergers who have been through CBT and ALL of them have stated it made things a hell of a lot worse. However, each AS person is different and for some it may work. If people would like to disagree, i'll explain the reasons for it not working on people with AS...the main reason for a diagnosis though is as you said...'relief'.

    Most people with AS, drive themselves near to insanity constantly thinking 'do i?'...'don't i'?...in the end my mum got out a 2k loan just to get it done as soon as possible....We in no way could afford a loan that size...
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    (Original post by Afrotortina)
    I prefer the term `Lunatic`.
    Thanks, really sensitive.
    Certainly. Wouldn't have it any other way.

    By the way, it is interesting to see people arguing over all these `mispellings` and `attributes` and `experiences`, with which many of them are purely semantic (especially that archaic spelling of `Asberger`:curious:)

    No, what I'm wondering is why those who are in no way directly affected by the condition (e.g. family members, friends, self-diagnosed) are debating the condition with those who are directly affected (i.e. Medically diagnosed). They have no real idea what it's like and yet may argue like they do, just for the sake or argument (this confrotational sentence should test your Asperger tendancies )

    I'm I being `elitist` here? Most certainly (and if you believe that, then you're definitely not Asperger! )! On the other hand here, the experiences posted on here of other confirmed Aspergers on here are fairly coherrent with my own.

    The confidence, intellectual esteem, willingness to explain things, interests in more `eclectic` pursuits but not so much that it takes them away from reality; all these things are pretty much central to the character that is the mild/borderline Asperger.

    (More severe Aspergers share many more traits with `classic Autism than `normies` or non-Aspergers.)

    Also, it is worth pointing out that when you've been diagnosed as a child (e.g. pre-school and any time before secondary school or middle school in America), you tend to have a alternative, almost `radically` different outlook to life than most others around you. That might seem like bullsh*t, but ask any of the others in this thread what I'm on about and they'll agree.

    At any rate, it looks like Kettle isn't interested in this thread any more. This thread might possibly die but let's hope it goes on for a bit more, just to see what happens.
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    (Original post by Eclectic Styles)
    Certainly. Wouldn't have it any other way.

    By the way, it is interesting to see people arguing over all these `mispellings` and `attributes` and `experiences`, with which many of them are purely semantic (especially that archaic spelling of `Asberger`:curious:)

    No, what I'm wondering is why those who are in no way directly affected by the condition (e.g. family members, friends, self-diagnosed) are debating the condition with those who are directly affected (i.e. Medically diagnosed). They have no real idea what it's like and yet may argue like they do, just for the sake or argument (this confrotational sentence should test your Asperger tendancies )

    I'm I being `elitist` here? Most certainly (and if you believe that, then you're definitely not Asperger! )! On the other hand here, the experiences posted on here of other confirmed Aspergers on here are fairly coherrent with my own.

    The confidence, intellectual esteem, willingness to explain things, interests in more `eclectic` pursuits but not so much that it takes them away from reality; all these things are pretty much central to the character that is the mild/borderline Asperger.

    (More severe Aspergers share many more traits with `classic Autism than `normies` or non-Aspergers.)

    Also, it is worth pointing out that when you've been diagnosed as a child (e.g. pre-school and any time before secondary school or middle school in America), you tend to have a alternative, almost `radically` different outlook to life than most others around you. That might seem like bullsh*t, but ask any of the others in this thread what I'm on about and they'll agree.

    At any rate, it looks like Kettle isn't interested in this thread any more. This thread might possibly die but let's hope it goes on for a bit more, just to see what happens.
    I'm sorry... I have no idea what you're on about... could you condense it please??
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    (Original post by Afrotortina)
    I'm sorry... I have no idea what you're on about... could you condense it please??
    I was just on about how people who are not medically diagnosed Aspergers and have self-diagnosed themselves tend to argue as though they are in the same `club` as us. I've seen it before; it's not cool.

    Not talking about the OP here directly, just so that's clear.

    And also how when you've been medically diagnosed as a child and grown up with that knowledge and the benefits and drawbacks it may or may not present/leave you with (e.g. special schools, over-protective parents, distant and unsympathetic parents, small if not non-existant social circle etc...), add to that your way of thinking and looking at life is different to most others and you've got quite an altenative outlook to life to others around you.
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    i was told that i had AS when I was 17. My outlook was rather low. I had no self-confidence as a teenager until I discovered that I had talents and could think for myself intellectually (read darwin). I tended to have a different outlook as I couldn't identify with others,and i wasn't comfortable with it but it only came out it my late teens. My mum thought I was insane since i was 11 and always pressured me to be active in extra-curricular activities, where I am not accepted and I can't do. it made me depressed and identitiless for years until I discovered that I actually had a brain. since then i learnt to accept myself and made friends more easily. btw my score on baron cohen's test is 40.
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    Good thought and a nice thing you have done. There are so many people who are suffering by aspergers syndrome. These can be kept aside by knowing our special features where all the people will recognize. Aspergers syndrome have rote memory where they will stand in a special way.
 
 
 
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