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    so difficult
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    (Original post by graemematt)
    For the OP, I'd recommend trying to get your hands on a general medicine book, like Master Medicine. Honestly, if you forget something and want to quickly find it, nothing will help you better than reading a quick paragraph, looking at a diagram, then applying that knowledge for the next part of the subject you're revising.

    GO BACK TO BASICS IF YOU'RE LOST! Unclear about how interferon works? Revise basic immunology and the MHC pathways. Not sure about Carpal Tunnel? Get out Gray's and look at the brachial plexus. Etc. Make things simple before you get complicated
    Shouldn't it be the other way around? :p: Brachial plexus is harrdd *cry*
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    (Original post by Lu-x)
    Shouldn't it be the other way around? :p: Brachial plexus is harrdd *cry*
    Haha! I just sat down and stared at it for hours, so that would explain how I know it Bit obsessive. I agree with you though, in general, anatomy is HARD
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    do anyone find physiology impossible to understand?
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    do anyone find physiology histology to understand?
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    (Original post by BIG HERO)
    do anyone find physiology histology to understand?
    Yes, anatomy is a lot of stuff to remember but it's mostly pretty logical, but physiology I really struggle to get my head around.
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    when I study physiology I fell am going to war>
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    (Original post by the_true_message)
    My friends studying medicine (Cambridge) say it's all just memory work.
    THIS

    OP: i'm exactly like you, in the sense that i do a ton of notes and then learn them last minute - the only problem is that memorising can't be done in a few days.

    I think the best thing to do is to start earlier - if you just spend 30 mins-1hr everyday looking through past lectures etc . then you wont get bogged down as much nearer to exam time. Also, the more time you look over something, the better it'll be integrated into your memory - are you sure that you are definitely a 'written' learner (have you tried saying your notes out loud/walking and reading you notes/listening to podcasts?)

    the way i'm learning anatomy is by making little stories up and learning things in groups e.g all muscles in head etc. You could also use mnemonics. Personally, if you understand the function of the muscle, it's often easier to remember it's name.

    Maybe get a good anatomy book that explains it well - i personally recommend moore and dalley - clinically orientated anatomy.

    Hope this helps! Good luck with your next exams =D
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    (Original post by MHMQ786)
    Hey

    I started studying medicine at the University of Birmingham last sept/oct (2009) and expected it to be difficult... Before applying, I had obviously talked to current students and knew it would be difficult... so I made sure I worked harder than I had ever done before..

    But after failing all 4 exams in the january exam period, I realised that I'd underestimated just how difficult it is.

    Luckily for me, the exams I sat in january make up 50% of those modules, so I have the chance to redeem myself in the summer, but it means that I'll have to get 60% or more (whereas previously I'd come out with 42%, 47%, 47% and 49% - 50% is the pass mark).

    I've always revised for exams by making notes beforehand and learning it all right near the end - pretty much last minute learning, and I'm finding it difficult to learn stuff as I go along. I'm also really stumped on how to learn anatomy. I've tried group sessions, and the stuff stays in my head for the week - 2 weeks at best, and then it's gone.

    So...
    Do any other medics have any advice they could offer me?
    I would really appreciate any helpful hints/advice! :confused:
    I'm in a similar position to you in that I need to score 30-35% higher in my final exam in order to pass the year. The problem is I'm finding the stress and pressure all too much.
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    Keep plugging away at it, learn broadly and then in depth if you've got the time/inclination to.

    Try different textbooks, a combination of having read about the larynx in both Dean and Peg and Grays was how I finally nailed that bit down. You also should try testing yourself casually just right now, you'll be surprised at what anatomy sticks when you challenge yourself to remember it, there is always a little to much to have the gut feeling that you are on top of it, you naturally go for the doubts of 'do I know these muscles? what if i don't, panicky panic panic', rather than the more confident,' I know the thorax and lower limb innvervation, what's up next?'.
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    It is very hard for everyone at sometime, i think most who say otherwise havent really tried it or considered what it is like. Secondly trying to seperate memory from the rest of mental processes, such as saying it doesnt require logic, would be false, in order to remember most vividly, you should understand the logics of the process.

    I frequently when looking at a chapter think to myself it is making no sense, rereading the line and feeling just lost, immediatly that fear of inferiority comes sweeping upon you. You simply need to accept that fear of not being good enough, is a natural part of striving for excellence, accept that is there. Secondly if you actually go outside of your closed dome of fears, you will find that the vast majority of your fellow students find the books just as, if not harder, and they probably harbor the same fears of not being good enough as you do.

    The text books have once and again lines which are formulated in a very cryptic manner. Just push yourself past that hill and once you reach the top and understand, you have succeeded, its not a question of whether or not you will feel despair at it being hard, because you will, its about accepting and understanding that this fear is shared with your students and that you are good enough and just need to keep at it.

    Often i find the things i thought i was too slow to learn, oncei get to class and need to utilize the knowledge i am way better at the subject than alot of others, so the fear is often unnecessary, and its all a matter of getting past that initial block of fear.
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    (Original post by MHMQ786)
    ...
    You've probably heard all this before, but I'd rather patronise than it go unsaid:

    Like others have already said, you need to make sure you review things. Over and over and over again. By the time I go in to exams I've looked at everything at least three times, and the things I want to remember well (e.g. for essays) much more.

    It sounds like a lot of work, but the more times you look at things, the less time it takes. Also, if you leave it too long you lose a lot the foundations you built originally and end up having to spend more time to re-learn it basically from scratch.

    The forgetting curve describes what I'm talking about:



    With green lines representing better retrieval/ less decay, partly due to more repetition. If you write up your lecture notes, that's a start. And then simply re-reading them before you go to bed, or at the weekend is better than nothing. Or maybe you might want to rewrite them. Make up rhymes. Draw pictures, spider diagrams or tables. Regardless, if you set aside a certain amount of time to work each day (as little or as much as suits you) then any of this time which isn't spent learning new material should be spent reviewing old stuff.

    Also, a lot of it is about forming cues. This might be a 'bottom up' approach, such that if you understand something you can work from base principles up to more complicated ideas. Or it might be just elaborating with more information then is necessary (provided it acts as a memory aide rather than an extra burden), and working 'backwards' from more complicated facts. If you've made links well between the facts then it's a lot easier to remember. You might find you like lots of acronyms, rhymes etc. I personally find breaking it down in to short sections of well-organised, written with clear subtitles helps as you can only organise it well if you've made some attempt at understanding it. It's the little things which can jog your memory.

    For anatomy, I personally find just looking at as many different pictures as possible is useful particularly if you're talking about slices. But that's just me...

    Just remember: the more you work the easier it will get. You'll spend progressively less time after longer intervals on a fact which you've revised a few times before, but also you'll get better at what works for you/ how you learn.

    Edit: Oh, and yeah. It's stupidly hard.
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    u need to go over stuff again and again, there is no point doing it once then just forget about it; especially with anatomy

    No easy way/ magic formula out of this if u wanna get that degree; medicine is a memory game
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    (Original post by BIG HERO)
    do anyone find physiology impossible to understand?
    yes. takes ages to get my head around it all.

    anatomy though..... :yep: love it, i find it so easy?!
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    I didn't have the privilege of having an exam in January so I have to study everything fresh. I agree with what some others have said - it is just a matter of memory work. For me I find that repetition is best. I can't just look at it once and expect myself to know everything. It is quite time consuming though. At the moment I'm not finding medicine itself difficult - just a lot of stuff to remember. And with physiology - I am not motivated at all to look at it. Have been at war with it ever since I started learning about it.
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    (Original post by MHMQ786)
    Hey

    I started studying medicine at the University of Birmingham last sept/oct (2009) and expected it to be difficult... Before applying, I had obviously talked to current students and knew it would be difficult... so I made sure I worked harder than I had ever done before..

    But after failing all 4 exams in the january exam period, I realised that I'd underestimated just how difficult it is.

    Luckily for me, the exams I sat in january make up 50% of those modules, so I have the chance to redeem myself in the summer, but it means that I'll have to get 60% or more (whereas previously I'd come out with 42%, 47%, 47% and 49% - 50% is the pass mark).

    I've always revised for exams by making notes beforehand and learning it all right near the end - pretty much last minute learning, and I'm finding it difficult to learn stuff as I go along. I'm also really stumped on how to learn anatomy. I've tried group sessions, and the stuff stays in my head for the week - 2 weeks at best, and then it's gone.

    So...
    Do any other medics have any advice they could offer me?
    I would really appreciate any helpful hints/advice! :confused:
    Hi,

    I'm also a first year at Brum and I know exactly what you mean!!

    When I revised for the MJM ICA (muscles joints movements, in-course assessment - worth 20% of the module) I started using flash cards I had made. I found this quite useful as writng it all out - muscle, action, innervation, blood supply etc. - consolidated the knowledge, and they were then very easy to just read before bed, or between lectures.

    I've carried this on now with the other modules for the summer exams. Just having basic facts on the frist few cards, getting more complicated as it goes on.

    Have you seen the facebook group? (Brum Medic's self help group) It's scary seeing how much other people know but it's really quite helpful.

    Hope it all goes well, and just think about those couple of weeks before the special study module...it'll all be worth it!
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    Mneumonics is the way forward - or as ive discovered lately drawing caractures of people will the illnesses - exaggerating all of the symptoms makes me laugh but i dont forget it. I cant do pages of words i have to imagen the patients or draw.
    I need to re re read some of the notes ive been making - but its driving me soft! I have the memory of a goldfish.
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    The only hard thing about medicine is getting motivated to get my arse into a library and study. On the rare occasions I actually do manage, the work then is fine!
 
 
 
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