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    Anyone got experience using them on their car? Do they effect handling massively?

    Had them on my Saxo but they were on when I brought it so I didn't know any different where as i'm now putting them on my Punto, only dropping it 4-5cm for the record.
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    Made by whom?

    If you use a proper manufacturer (Koni, Spax, etc) then it might make a notable difference if the cars suspension is set up for it. If you stick in a pair of ripspeed and don't adjust anything else in the suspension the difference will either be indifferent, or crashing...
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    I've used lowering springs in my Grande Punto before.. they were Apex I think. The ride was horrible. But the handling was great.

    Since changing to my Ibiza I bought some £200 Coilovers off eBay and they were rubbish 'Ta-Technix' and I swear to God they were so bad I ripped them out after two months and chucked them.

    I've now got some AP Coilovers, whilst not the most expensive at £420 they lower the car the amound I wanted and the handling is awesome not to mention the ride wasn't as bad as I thought it would be considering the car is low as hell.

    My advice would be if you want good springs only try some Eibach. If you want to go down the route of coilovers then spend your money on some decent ones and avoid eBay sellers at all costs!
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    (Original post by gbduo)
    Made by whom?

    If you use a proper manufacturer (Koni, Spax, etc) then it might make a notable difference if the cars suspension is set up for it. If you stick in a pair of ripspeed and don't adjust anything else in the suspension the difference will either be indifferent, or crashing...
    Koni, it's keeping me on the road at the end of the day so might aswell pay a bit.

    Cheers, ordered them.
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    Koni and Eibach-you can never fail with them! But good idea to check what's best for your specific model...

    Also I wouldn't slam it more than 30mm, due to speedbump issues.
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    (Original post by Rucklo)
    Koni, it's keeping me on the road at the end of the day so might aswell pay a bit.

    Cheers, ordered them.
    No worries, have fun!
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    i doubt they would EFFECT the handling at all.
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    (Original post by Higgy90)
    i doubt they would EFFECT the handling at all.
    Huh, lower centre of gravity = better handling, so yes they will improve handling.
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    (Original post by Rucklo)
    Anyone got experience using them on their car? Do they effect handling massively?

    Had them on my Saxo but they were on when I brought it so I didn't know any different where as i'm now putting them on my Punto, only dropping it 4-5cm for the record.
    *only* 40-50mm, thats a fair drop? I think 50mm is going to be too much for standard shocks, you'll probably need shortened ones
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    (Original post by Sam2005)
    Huh, lower centre of gravity = better handling, so yes they will improve handling.
    He's not disputing the effectiveness of the springs, he's merely upholding the laws of the English language. For he is...the Grammar Police!
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    (Original post by Higgy90)
    i doubt they would EFFECT the handling at all.
    Oh har har.. fail.

    (Original post by Sam2005)
    *only* 40-50mm, thats a fair drop? I think 50mm is going to be too much for standard shocks, you'll probably need shortened ones
    Would be 40.
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    (Original post by Rucklo)
    Oh har har.. fail.



    Would be 40.
    Fair enough, you fitting them yourself?
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    (Original post by Sam2005)
    Huh, lower centre of gravity = better handling, so yes they will improve handling.
    Handling doesn't just mean going around corners. Ride quality, handling rough roads, how the car reacts to a bump mid corner, how the car reacts to harsh braking and acceleration are all 'handling' and bad springs could easily affect these negatively rather than positively. My Land Rover was lifted yet handles better than stock - mostly because the lift springs are stiffer than originals. As a result I can out-drive most euro-boxes with teenagers behind the wheel, and even a few large Audis and Beamers in my time too. This is only along twisty country roads though, I obviously can't keep up on the straights. It really pisses them off when they can't keep up with a rusty old Land Rover with their brand new exec. cars and I've even seen some downright dangerous driving executed to try and keep up.

    Moral of the story - lowering the car with crap springs is worse than setting it up right at the factory height. A badly lowered car will handle awfully compared to the same car with a proper multi-link suspension set up at stock height.
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    Depends on the type of car. You'll find that the consensus on different owners clubs varies dependant on what has been found to suit the car. Yes, they will make it handle better, but really you should combine them with some uprated shocks too. Obviously coilovers are the best options, but are expensive and a harsh ride.
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    Save up for coilovers
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    (Original post by hontoir)
    Save up for coilovers
    It's my second car... I only intend to have it 2 years odd until I can get a bigger engine car. £400+ seems ridiculous for just lowering it.

    And yeah fitting them myself when they come.
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    (Original post by Nuffles)
    Handling doesn't just mean going around corners. Ride quality, handling rough roads, how the car reacts to a bump mid corner, how the car reacts to harsh braking and acceleration are all 'handling' and bad springs could easily affect these negatively rather than positively. My Land Rover was lifted yet handles better than stock - mostly because the lift springs are stiffer than originals. As a result I can out-drive most euro-boxes with teenagers behind the wheel, and even a few large Audis and Beamers in my time too. This is only along twisty country roads though, I obviously can't keep up on the straights. It really pisses them off when they can't keep up with a rusty old Land Rover with their brand new exec. cars and I've even seen some downright dangerous driving executed to try and keep up.

    Moral of the story - lowering the car with crap springs is worse than setting it up right at the factory height. A badly lowered car will handle awfully compared to the same car with a proper multi-link suspension set up at stock height.
    Hmm yeah would love to see a land rover 'handling' well around corners without tipping over... but nevermind...

    He's lowering a standard 1.2 (im guessing) punto, it will improve handling. We aren't talking about chucking £50 springs on a evo, which has a good setup from standard, and I'd agree, that would worsen handling. Its a punto, handling can't really get any worse
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    (Original post by Rucklo)
    Anyone got experience using them on their car? Do they effect handling massively?
    This is an easy question to answer, basically your car has been set up by many experienced engineers working with advanced computer modelling and track data to be optimised for your car. Then you come along knowing very little about springs and dampers but say “I’ll have a go anyway”, do you really think that you’re likely to do a better job?

    Also cars with a low ride height rarely handle very well (not to mention the lack of comfort), the problem is that on a smooth race track that may work fine (with a car that is designed to be very light and have low sprung mass) but in the real world the lack of suspension travel on a heavy car, rough roads etc. makes them...not very fast at all really if not a bit dangerous at times.

    Let me pass on some advice as someone who has seen a lot of this before:
    1. Modifying a car is never worth it, usually you will hurt the re-sale value and rarely will the car be much faster just by adding a few off the shelf bits (often it will actually be slower).
    2. You can make a car a little faster however by stripping out all the unneeded weight (seats, linings, mats, carpets, spare wheel, air con, radio etc.). This is by far the cheapest way to make your car faster...of course it also makes your car rubbish in terms of entertainment value as you now have a slightly faster car shell.
    3. The tires, with track tires most cars suspension would fail anyway under the stress. Your car is simply not designed to handle the intensive loads that anything more than spirited driving places on the car. You simply don’t waste money to over-spec a hatchback if you are in the business of producing cars.
    4. 99.9% of the time the driver is the weakest link, better to spend your money improving the driver rather than the car.
    5. Save you money and buy a faster car that is made that way as standard. Have you ever wondered why most petrol heads don’t tend to purchase modified cars? It’s because when Prodrive do it they have years of experience to lean on that some bloke in his garage does not.

    I love modified cars, I really do, but if you want a faster car it’s cheaper to just go and buy one.
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    (Original post by Hippopothomas)
    This is an easy question to answer, basically your car has been set up by many experienced engineers working with advanced computer modelling and track data to be optimised for your car. Then you come along knowing very little about springs and dampers but say “I’ll have a go anyway”, do you really think that you’re likely to do a better job?

    Also cars with a low ride height rarely handle very well (not to mention the lack of comfort), the problem is that on a smooth race track that may work fine (with a car that is designed to be very light and have low sprung mass) but in the real world the lack of suspension travel on a heavy car, rough roads etc. makes them...not very fast at all really if not a bit dangerous at times.

    Let me pass on some advice as someone who has seen a lot of this before:
    1. Modifying a car is never worth it, usually you will hurt the re-sale value and rarely will the car be much faster just by adding a few off the shelf bits (often it will actually be slower).
    2. You can make a car a little faster however by stripping out all the unneeded weight (seats, linings, mats, carpets, spare wheel, air con, radio etc.). This is by far the cheapest way to make your car faster...of course it also makes your car rubbish in terms of entertainment value as you now have a slightly faster car shell.
    3. The tires, with track tires most cars suspension would fail anyway under the stress. Your car is simply not designed to handle the intensive loads that anything more than spirited driving places on the car. You simply don’t waste money to over-spec a hatchback if you are in the business of producing cars.
    4. 99.9% of the time the driver is the weakest link, better to spend your money improving the driver rather than the car.
    5. Save you money and buy a faster car that is made that way as standard. Have you ever wondered why most petrol heads don’t tend to purchase modified cars? It’s because when Prodrive do it they have years of experience to lean on that some bloke in his garage does not.

    I love modified cars, I really do, but if you want a faster car it’s cheaper to just go and buy one.
    I'm clearly not lowering it to be quick, they look a lot better lowered. I'm just going on 18 so its a retarded idea to get a faster car because of the insurance, thats why I want to mess about with a crappier car for a couple of years until I have the NCB.

    And thats one of the reasons i'm giving it a go now, would much rather **** it up on a £1.2k punto than a more expensive one in the future.

    As for the depreciation, its not worth much as it is anyway, by the time I finish with it, will probably end up scrapping it tbf. If it gets me some NCB, this car has done its job.
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    (Original post by Rucklo)
    they look a lot better lowered.
    That is a matter of opinion .

    I hope you intend on declaring the modifications to your insurance company .
 
 
 
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