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    I really could go on with examples from my work. I work part-time in a supermarket and it's so infuriating when I see signs which haven't been thought about whatsoever. I work in the clothing section and see things like "Mens", "Childrens' Jewellery", "Accessorie's" or "Strawberrys". I suspect most customers don't notice.
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    (Original post by ryan342)
    I really could go on with examples from my work. I work part-time in a supermarket and it's so infuriating when I see signs which haven't been thought about whatsoever. I work in the clothing section and see things like "Mens", "Childrens' Jewellery", "Accessorie's" or "Strawberrys". I suspect most customers don't notice.
    it speaks volumes about the state of our society

    *mourns for the loss of decency*
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    (Original post by ramroff)
    that is really terrible :toofunny: :toofunny:

    militancy is the answer to our woes at the end of the day, it worked for george bush so it will work for us! :ninja:
    Yes, indeed. Most of the United States' imports come from abroad, you know?
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    (Original post by ryan342)
    Yes, indeed. Most of the United States' imports come from abroad, you know?
    Indeed, trust the ever so intelligence George Bush to make this shocking observation.
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    (Original post by ryan342)
    I really could go on with examples from my work. I work part-time in a supermarket and it's so infuriating when I see signs which haven't been thought about whatsoever. I work in the clothing section and see things like "Mens", "Childrens' Jewellery", "Accessorie's" or "Strawberrys". I suspect most customers don't notice.
    At Christmas last year, a sign in the window of a well-known high-street store that sells women's clothing included the words "twinkle twinkle your a star." That one made me laugh quite a lot. Also, has anyone else ever seen signs in shops which say "ring bell for assistants"? Whenever I see one of those, I'm tempted to ask why the assistants can't ring the bell themselves.
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    (Original post by buttons7)
    At Christmas last year, a sign in the window of a well-known high-street store that sells women's clothing included the words "twinkle twinkle your a star." That one made me laugh quite a lot. Also, has anyone else ever seen signs in shops which say "ring bell for assistants"? Whenever I see one of those, I'm tempted to ask why the assistants can't ring the bell themselves.
    I haven't seen the assistants bell, no. I've given up making comments about things like that as it's often the case that they don't have a clue what you're talking about.

    The most annoying misuse of language for me has to be the confusion between your & you're and also there, they're & their. It's just awful.
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    (Original post by ryan342)
    I haven't seen the assistants bell, no. I've given up making comments about things like that as it's often the case that they don't have a clue what you're talking about.

    The most annoying misuse of language for me has to be the confusion between your & you're and also there, they're & their. It's just awful.
    Hmm, yes, the your/you're and the they're/their/there thing (plus its/it's) are definitely among the most annoying mistakes that are made.

    As far as making pedantic comments goes, I do still find it kind of fun (even if they have no idea what I'm on about), if only because shop assistants are usually so morose and unfriendly that I appreciate the opportunity of having more to say than just "Yes," "Thank you" or "No, I don't have a PIN number."
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    (Original post by ramroff)
    that is really terrible :toofunny: :toofunny:

    militancy is the answer to our woes at the end of the day, it worked for george bush so it will work for us! :ninja:
    George Bush? Being pedantic about the english language? I think I'm gonna have to go have a lie down...

    (I realise what you MEANT to say, but what you DID say is open to interpretation - exactly the sort of thing this society should strive to stamp out!)
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    Surely ambiguity is one of the joys of the English language?
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    Excellent!!! This looks like fun - may I join?

    My gripe is also with the apostrophe's :p: (I did THAT on purpose before you flame me). Particularly CD's which seems to have become standard now. I believe there is actually a society that goes round painting over apostrophes in the wrong places..... hmm... who mentioned militancy?
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    (Original post by Madelyn)
    Surely ambiguity is one of the joys of the English language?
    Everything in moderation! Ambiguity with things like their/they're/there isn't joyful, it's just a bit annoying.
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    That's not what I meant by ambiguity, misuse of their/they're/there is simply wrong. The ambiguity thing was directed at CrazyChemist, who was berating someone else for leaving his words open to interpretation.
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    (Original post by Madelyn)
    That's not what I meant by ambiguity, misuse of their/they're/there is simply wrong. The ambiguity thing was directed at CrazyChemist, who was berating someone else for leaving his words open to interpretation.
    Hang on - many heated arguments have followed from a simple ambiguous statement that was misinterpreted. I was not trying to berate ramroff as such - just pointing out that the statement was ambiguous and that ambiguity in general is best avoided because it can lead to confusion and misunderstanding. How is this at all a 'joy' of the english language? Just think of the deaths that have arisen from different interpretations of (presumably ambiguous) religious texts.
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    There's a carpet shop near me that I had to go past every day on my way to college: "Kings Carpets" selling (In 8ft high letters) "BED'S"
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    (Original post by CrazyChemist)
    Hang on - many heated arguments have followed from a simple ambiguous statement that was misinterpreted. I was not trying to berate ramroff as such - just pointing out that the statement was ambiguous and that ambiguity in general is best avoided because it can lead to confusion and misunderstanding. How is this at all a 'joy' of the english language? Just think of the deaths that have arisen from different interpretations of (presumably ambiguous) religious texts.
    Things like the European Reformation would not have been avoided by a loss of ambiguity: the original (Hebrew/Greek) text of the Bible is actually fairly unambiguous, it had simply been poorly translated. Language and literature ought to be beautiful: setting everything out entirely beyond any possibility of ambiguity would lead to a) much longer texts and b) much worse written texts. This is why the European constitution is failing, while that of the U.S. (written in fairly deathless prose) is still going strong.
    Moreover, in terms of literature, much ambiguity has given rise to scholarly debate over the author's true intentions, which, aside from any interest such debate may have per se, often gains the reader greater understanding of both work and author. One (admittedly poor) example of this is one of Desdemona's lines in 'Othello', "That he made me such a man" - the debate is whether "me" is intended to be accusative or dative, which has a notable impact both on the sentiment here expressed and on the character (and hence the tone of the play) as a whole.
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    (Original post by Madelyn)
    Things like the European Reformation would not have been avoided by a loss of ambiguity: the original (Hebrew/Greek) text of the Bible is actually fairly unambiguous, it had simply been poorly translated. Language and literature ought to be beautiful: setting everything out entirely beyond any possibility of ambiguity would lead to a) much longer texts and b) much worse written texts. This is why the European constitution is failing, while that of the U.S. (written in fairly deathless prose) is still going strong.
    Moreover, in terms of literature, much ambiguity has given rise to scholarly debate over the author's true intentions, which, aside from any interest such debate may have per se, often gains the reader greater understanding of both work and author. One (admittedly poor) example of this is one of Desdemona's lines in 'Othello', "That he made me such a man" - the debate is whether "me" is intended to be accusative or dative, which has a notable impact both on the sentiment here expressed and on the character (and hence the tone of the play) as a whole.
    I also think that ambiguity can be a good thing in literature and I can accept authors having poetic licences when it comes to creative and philosophical writing. I quite like discussing interpretations of texts and various statements; the one above is a good example.

    Law is actually quite ambiguous, too: it has to be. If we had laws that simply said ‘this is right, this is wrong and if you commit this crime you will be fined £500’ there would be chaos and the justice system in this country would break down. Instead, though, we have short pieces of legislation which can be debated at length in court, depending on lawyers' interpretations and then Judges (or very occasionally, Juries) may decide on a suitable punishment. If there weren’t this flexibility the law would seem wholly unfair and it would be too rigid to work effectively.
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    (Original post by PhilipGarsed)
    Excellent!!! This looks like fun - may I join?

    My gripe is also with the apostrophe's :p: (I did THAT on purpose before you flame me). Particularly CD's which seems to have become standard now. I believe there is actually a society that goes round painting over apostrophes in the wrong places..... hmm... who mentioned militancy?
    You're on the list.

    CD's is very annoying, I know. People also seem very keen to put apostrophes in plural words (before the s) if the last letter is a vowel. For example: area's, colleague's or toe's. There is actually some historical evidence that this was once the convention of printers but I very much doubt that the people who use such apostrophes are aware of this and are simply being traditional or old-fashioned in their punctuation.
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    I found some shocking pictures (attached). :eek:
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    (Original post by ryan342)
    Well naturally I am the boss. There's not really much point is asking people about their English language qualifications as any idiot can get an A* in English. I think to some extent grammar, punctuation and spelling can be subjective (where to put commas, colons and semicolons). It's probably therefore better if everybody can have their say and then the others can simply berate them if they're wrong.
    By your definition I am an idiot, the only idiot in my year but prevention is better than cure =0) May I join?
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    By your definition I am an idiot, the only idiot in my year but prevention is better than cure =0) May I join?
    Yes, of course.
 
 
 
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