PPE/ E&M Reading list Watch

This discussion is closed.
tanncmi
Badges: 0
#21
Report 13 years ago
#21
my reading lists got lost in the post somewhere on its way to singapore so i never read anything last year, but you may want to get these books:

Simon Blackburn's 'Think'
Hal Varian, Intermediate Microeconomics 6th ed.
JS Mill, On Liberty (not as important as) Utilitarianism
also Marx - selected works, ed. by David Mclellan, 2nd ed. i never managed to get a non-short loan copy of this.
Rousseau's Social Contract, I think something to do with Maurice Cranston. Or is that for Mill...
Hodges' Logic, very important text, a small green paperback. dont forget to pick up 'Logic Exercises' (green) and 'Doing Logic' (pink) from the philosophy faculty, five quid for both, and ten for Hodges.
A good maths for econs textbook. I have Alpha Chiang's and it's almost all you need, although it doesn't ahve anything on probability / statistics.

There aren't any institutional politics texts here, mostly because there are too many of them, and there are only bits in each that are useful anyway. You should find them easily in most libraries anyway.
0
sixthirtythree
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#22
Report 13 years ago
#22
Having just received the E&M reading list from someone who's already fulfilled her offer, I admit firstly, being v. v. scared and secondly, having second thoughts about Oxford. Or maybe just Merton.

I mean, three pages of books - is that like, really necessary? It's meant to be a doss course! Admittedly, a lot of the content is commentary, but like, with sentences such as "it becomes rather verbose towards the end. It is worth getting at least as far as chapter 6" sort of suggests they actually expect you to read the books. I'm going to cry.

And nmfaiz - you have no idea how different it is to yours. After a brief glance, I don't think there's a single book that's present on both...

(And I'll stop whining now)

Meeeh. Oh well, I can't get hold of the books anyway, and there's still results to be considered so what ho.
0
nmfaiz
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#23
Report 13 years ago
#23
wow..thats amazing. i mean THREE pages. but then, i guess it differs between colleges?
0
H&E
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#24
Report 13 years ago
#24
It's certainly likely to differe between Merton and non-Merton colleges!

I know SFA about the management or stats aspect of the E&M course, but for the maths and economics aspects of it I don't think any background reading is necessary. It's about knowing and applying an array of techniques and models which are actually pretty limited, but in an agile and sophisticated way.
0
Queen_A
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#25
Report 13 years ago
#25
What about the infamous 'game theory'? Maybe someone could recommend an introductory book about it? (I don't do economics, just maths).
0
sixthirtythree
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#26
Report 13 years ago
#26
(Original post by Queen_A)
What about the infamous 'game theory'? Maybe someone could recommend an introductory book about it? (I don't do economics, just maths).
Thinking Strategically (Dixit and Nalebuff)
0
Drogue
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#27
Report 13 years ago
#27
(Original post by H&E)
I know SFA about the management or stats aspect of the E&M course, but for the maths and economics aspects of it I don't think any background reading is necessary. It's about knowing and applying an array of techniques and models which are actually pretty limited, but in an agile and sophisticated way.
Chapters 1-3 of Varian are very useful to have read before, as at last our first week was 1-6, which is a little much for a first weeks work. 1-4 was prep reading though

Megsy: they usually expect you to read a few of them, IIRC, but not all. Our first reading list was 2 pages, but the idea was to choose between books in each section. At least that's what we were told, at Merton it may be different.
0
H&E
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#28
Report 13 years ago
#28
(Original post by Drogue)
Chapters 1-3 of Varian are very useful to have read before, as at last our first week was 1-6, which is a little much for a first weeks work. 1-4 was prep reading though
Certainly true - I read the Micro section of Begg, and it made my first weeks much easier (not that it did me much good - got 45% in my micro collection :eek: ). But that's what I'd term preparatory reading, rather than background reading. Prepatory reading is very useful, esp when it's of core textbooks like Varian; what I was getting at is that background stuff lke 'free lunch', 'armchair economist ' etc is very unlikely to be of much use come prelims time, which is not the case for history, politics etc
0
Amrad
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#29
Report 13 years ago
#29
I haven't got a reading list for PPE in the post and am assuming I won't get one - they've sent me just about everything else imaginable already. I guess I can count myself lucky then and just hope we don't get thrown in at the deep end.
0
JSM
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#30
Report 13 years ago
#30
Don't bother reading anything in preparation, outside of books that you would read normally. But, if you are desperate to read something for it, choose a book that looks appealing to you. There is no set way of getting into Oxford. I got in, I was drunk and hungover at interviews, didnt mention a single book in all three of my interviews (but i hadnt read anything specifically, although I had read pretty much every book that has been mentioned, as a general interest thing during GCSEs)
0
designer
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#31
Report 13 years ago
#31
I read "Free Lunch" (David Smith) and "The Armchair Economist" (Steven Landsburg) as I considered a degree in Econ. Also, mentioned it on my PS but weren't questioned about either in my interviews (of which I had three).

I found the latter book both enjoyable and useful. Also, started to read Begg's "Economics" (which is on my reading list)... I've never formally studied the subject so it's good for that level but wouldn't recommend it if you're thinking about applying and need something to read.
0
sixthirtythree
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#32
Report 13 years ago
#32
(Original post by Drogue)
Chapters 1-3 of Varian are very useful to have read before, as at last our first week was 1-6, which is a little much for a first weeks work. 1-4 was prep reading though

Megsy: they usually expect you to read a few of them, IIRC, but not all. Our first reading list was 2 pages, but the idea was to choose between books in each section. At least that's what we were told, at Merton it may be different.
Am totally going to read a few of them - the shortest ones. Which is basically a Coase essay, an Orwell essay and the Communist Manifesto. They better be happy with my tremendous amount of effort... *forsees a future Third*
0
Amrad
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#33
Report 13 years ago
#33
Okay I'm getting a little bored and can feel my brain turning to putty - would the first few chapters of Varian be the best thing to dip into? For PPE don't you only do 2 disciplines per term or something? If so, I might end up not doing Economics until next term?
0
La Gioconda
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#34
Report 13 years ago
#34
Is the level of difficulty of the microecoomics in Varian way beyond that covered ib higher level/A-level economics?
0
Drogue
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#35
Report 13 years ago
#35
It's completely different. A level economics doesn't deal with algebra or the maths side. A level micro is almost entirely logic and mathematics, with little discussion. Because of your assumptions (perfect competition/monopoly/well-behaved preferences/etc.) you know the effect of something, and while a knowledge of what happens in reality is very useful, it's not the discussion based subject it is at a level.

Varian assumes little prior knowledge, so it'll make sense without A level economics, however it is very different to a level economics, and you'll learn things in a different way. The first couple of chapters should be easy, but once it gets onto choice, utility and revealed preference, it becomes a lot more complex.
0
Traum
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#36
Report 13 years ago
#36
Hey just wondering who are you guys recieving those books from? So far i've only managed a few chapters of "Small is still beautiful" before returning it to the Library with a £2 fine..... Found the views in there good but extremist.....

Where can one find such wonderful, magical reading list? (but 2/3 pages? It'll take me a few weeks just reading the reading list!)


And is there any point in doing any Management reading?
0
Drogue
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#37
Report 13 years ago
#37
(Original post by Traum)
Hey just wondering who are you guys recieving those books from? So far i've only managed a few chapters of "Small is still beautiful" before returning it to the Library with a £2 fine..... Found the views in there good but extremist.....
We got a £60 book grant at the start of the year. Small is Beautiful I bought ages ago for peanuts, and the library at uni has 8 week loans. But I bought Thinking Strategically and The Accidental Theorist ages ago. Well worth £20 to get 2 or 3 interesting books.

(Original post by Traum)
Where can one find such wonderful, magical reading list? (but 2/3 pages? It'll take me a few weeks just reading the reading list!)
The college sends them to freshers, usually after their main pack from college.

(Original post by Traum)
And is there any point in doing any Management reading?
Yes, a little always helps. No need to do much, a few readings of the economist and the FT helps a lot, but a couple of books might be handy. One by Richard Wittington (forgot the name ) is especially useful, being both good and written by the E&M course co-ordinator.
0
La Gioconda
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#38
Report 13 years ago
#38
IS there anyone here looking to sell a Varian secondhand- I cannot seem to find it at the second hand bookshops around but then I haven't been looking very earnestly...please PM me, if you have an offer. Thank you.
0
rajeeb
Badges: 0
#39
Report 13 years ago
#39
I wouldn't stress about this too much guys (for E+M). Yes the reading list is long, but in the first few weeks everyone is in the same boat and the adrenalin/desire to me conscientious is high and gets you through it. I didn't really do any prep at all and managed fine - if I were you i'd just enjoy your summer!
0
designer
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#40
Report 13 years ago
#40
(Original post by Drogue)
One by Richard Wittington (forgot the name ) is especially useful, being both good and written by the E&M course coordinator.
I was interviewed by him (didn't realise he coordinated the course though)... I do remember him yawning a lot during my interview which didn't help with my concentration at all. Goes to show that you can never tell how an interview really went...
0
X
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Do you have a role model?

Yes - I know them personally (295)
26.06%
Yes - they're famous (288)
25.44%
No I don't (549)
48.5%

Watched Threads

View All