A Degree from the UK or USA? Which one is harder/difficult to obtain?

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MyHeartLiesInU
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If you had the change will you do a degree in the USA or stay here in the UK?

Which One do you thing is better? I know some may say it depends where you want to work but I did some research and UK employers dont mind hiring graduates with a USA degree.

Also which one do you think is harder to obtain? USA degrees take around 4 years minimum e.g. Business and it takes more years for subjects like Medicine and Law.

Also when I was looking in Google apparently UK degrees are easier to obtain because they say more and more people are obtaining higher grades in A levels and some people think is because A levels are too easy and thus applying the same to the degrees (I honesltly dont know why they say this, dont believe me go and have a look) :woo:
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tikkitak
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Degrees from the USA are alot more expensive to get. Thats all I know really .
I guess it also depends on what degree you're doing i.e. I think a medical degree would be pretty well respected regardless of which country its from.
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FTstudies
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(Original post by MyHeartLiesInU)
If you had the change will you do a degree in the USA or stay here in the UK?

Which One do you thing is better? I know some may say it depends where you want to work but I did some research and UK employers dont mind hiring graduates with a USA degree.

Also which one do you think is harder to obtain? USA degrees take around 4 years minimum e.g. Business and it takes more years for subjects like Medicine and Law.

Also when I was looking in Google apparently UK degrees are easier to obtain because they say more and more people are obtaining higher grades in A levels and some people think is because A levels are too easy and thus applying the same to the degrees (I honesltly dont know why they say this, dont believe me go and have a look) :woo:
Although you have quite a few stereotypes about A-levels and such in there. I think it would be fair to say that they are equally valued. I mean, I think degrees from the UK, may be held higher in the UK. As US degrees, may be held higher in the US. Though that is my personal view.

Although I would like the chance to go to America, I wouldn't like to study there for 3-4 years, firstly the costs are huge at some places. Also, I would prefer to just study in the UK in general! But neither will make a huge impact I would imagine over the other candidate at say, a job interview.
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MyHeartLiesInU
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(Original post by tikkitak)
Degrees from the USA are alot more expensive to get. Thats all I know really .
I guess it also depends on what degree you're doing i.e. I think a medical degree would be pretty well respected regardless of which country its from.
It's very true, degrees from the USA are very expensive for example it can cost up to $50,000 dollars for a degree at Harvard or Yale or Presceton. Thats over 32,000 pounds for a single year LOL

I was looking at Standford University it cost 10,000 pounds per year including living costs and books and personal expenses. Not Bad!!! I was looking at Standford University because good business leaders have studied there like Peter Drucker 'The Father of Management':yep:
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danny111
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(Original post by MyHeartLiesInU)
If you had the change will you do a degree in the USA or stay here in the UK?

Which One do you thing is better? I know some may say it depends where you want to work but I did some research and UK employers dont mind hiring graduates with a USA degree.

Also which one do you think is harder to obtain? USA degrees take around 4 years minimum e.g. Business and it takes more years for subjects like Medicine and Law.

Also when I was looking in Google apparently UK degrees are easier to obtain because they say more and more people are obtaining higher grades in A levels and some people think is because A levels are too easy and thus applying the same to the degrees (I honesltly dont know why they say this, dont believe me go and have a look) :woo:
as far as I am aware you are awfully uninformed.

You dont do "medicine" or "law" at undergraduate level. you go to Grad School to do Law or Medicine.

and people who take APs I belive may qualify to do their undergraduate in 3 years.

the logic about a levels is easier => uni is easier is BS. it all depends where you go to uni anyway. somehow i doubt people doing engineering at imperial really do the same diffiuclty as those doing it at a uni outside the top 20.
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Summer241
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The UK is the second-most popular country for international students to obtain a degree in, after the US. So I would assume a degree in the US is regarded slightly higher than one from the UK. Both are very respectable internationally.
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neodymium
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Degrees from the US are generally higher regarded than their UK counterparts. Not sure exactly why.

(Original post by Summer241)
The UK is the second-most popular country for international students to obtain a degree in, after the US. So I would assume a degree in the US is regarded slightly higher than one from the UK. Both are very respectable internationally.
But the US attracts brighter/more genuine students, whereas in the UK a significant chunk of the international students are either academically under-qualified, or are just here to the "visa colleges".
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superman19
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(Original post by Summer241)
The UK is the second-most popular country for international students to obtain a degree in, after the US. So I would assume a degree in the US is regarded slightly higher than one from the UK. Both are very respectable internationally.
Or beacause the US has many, many more universities?
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Sisko_197
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The US is generally considered to be superior.
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GodspeedGehenna
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(Original post by MyHeartLiesInU)
some people think is because A levels are too easy and thus applying the same to the degrees (I honesltly dont know why they say this, dont believe me go and have a look) :woo:
After spending over 5 years in the American education system, I can safely say that schooling to them is just a way of babysitting. About a quarter of my lessons were just "Ok, no class today. We're just going to watch Antz the film". The rest of the lessons were: Open your textbook to page x and outline the chapter. Done.

When I moved back to the UK, I had to work my ass off to catch up. I chose to enter the year below purely because I had so much to catch up on.

The American students I met were so embarrasingly dim witted. "What language do you speak in England?" "Isn't the Eiffel tower Tower in England?" "Do you have hamburgers in England?" "Do you have pizza in England?" "Did you leave England because of the communists?". This was a consistent occurrence.

I pretty much slept every lesson in highschool and I got nothing but straight A's.

I've always been told that UK A-Levels are the equivalent of doing a degree in the US.
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Pink Bullets
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-In the US, you usually have to take classes in every general subject area. If you're only good at one subject, then you're unlikely to get a good final result.

-Every year counts equally in the US, as opposed to in the UK where the first year counts for nothing/very little, so it's not possible to slack off in your first year and still get a good result.

-Assessment in the US is continual; ie. every week you have assignments and tests that are assessed and count toward your final mark. In the UK (at least in my experience of two degrees), your mark tends to be based on a couple of assignments or exams at the end of the term. Hence, it is possible to slack off for most of the term and then cram everything in at the end (this may vary in different courses).


On the other hand:

-There is more 'hand holding' in the US. I.e. your professor will tell you to read chapter 5 of a certain book by the next class, when you'll be assessed on that chapter. In the UK, you generally are given a list of books that are relevant to the course, and it's up to you to read as much or as little as you want. You therefore need more self-discipline to succeed in the UK.

-It is sometimes said that the subject matter in the UK is taught to a higher level than it is in the US, though this point is difficult to quantify.

(Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
I've always been told that UK A-Levels are the equivalent of doing a degree in the US.
You've been told wrong... try getting a graduate job in the US with a-levels...

I went to a British school for a year in year 10. When I came back to the US, I had to take maths and science classes with the year below me for the rest of high school, because the content of the maths and science GCSEs were below what my peers in the US were learning at the same age.
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Nathanielle
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In the US your education depends largely on where you attended High School and how keen you were on taking higher level courses. The High School diploma isn't usually qualifying to go straight to university(meaning universities compared to European standards), exspecially outside the USA, unless you got high scores in both SAT and AP. The USA hasn't only Stanford, Columbia, Illinois-Champaign, but also a lot of Colleges (not even talking of Community Colleges), where your education is below the usual standard at polytechnics.

With good grades e.g. in Abitur or APs you haven't to do the general courses required at the first year in your undergraduate degree. As the High School diploma requires less years than in Europe, that isn't really surprising.
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accountingmaniac2010
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Why would you spend 200 000 dollars to study in usa? I would rather keep the money in the bank and live off the interest, whilst getting a student loan and go to a university in the uk.
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Pink Bullets
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(Original post by accountingmaniac2010)
Why would you spend 200 000 dollars to study in usa? I would rather keep the money in the bank and live off the interest, whilst getting a student loan and go to a university in the uk.
Hardly anyone actually spends $200,000 to study in the USA. Heard of financial aid?

And, if you're not a permanent EU resident, studying in the UK is not hugely less expensive than studying in the US. And you can't get cushy fluffy UK student loans if you're not from the UK either.
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accountingmaniac2010
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(Original post by Pink Bullets)
Hardly anyone actually spends $200,000 to study in the USA. Heard of financial aid?

And, if you're not a permanent EU resident, studying in the UK is not hugely less expensive than studying in the US. And you can't get cushy fluffy UK student loans if you're not from the UK either.
Source? I doubt the colleges can give everyone a financial aid. :rolleyes:
How is the UK not less expensive? Costs 10 000 per year for fees compared to 32 000 in USA. I guess you are weak in maths. :rolleyes:
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Pink Bullets
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(Original post by accountingmaniac2010)
Source? I doubt the colleges can give everyone a financial aid. :rolleyes:
How is the UK not less expensive? Costs 10 000 per year for fees compared to 32 000 in USA. I guess you are weak in maths. :rolleyes:
(Original post by http://www.collegeboard.com/student/pay/add-it-up/4494.html)
53 percent of students attend four-year schools with annual tuition and fees below $9,000

After grants are taken into consideration, the net price the average undergraduate pays for a college education is significantly lower than the published tuition and fees.

only about 20 percent of all students attend colleges with tuition and fees totaling $36,000 or higher per year.

More than $168 billion in financial aid is available to students and their families.

About two-thirds of all full-time undergraduate students receive grant aid. In 2009-10, estimated aid in the form of grants and tax benefits averaged about $3,000 per student at public two-year colleges, about $5,400 at public four-year colleges, and about $14,400 per student at private four-year colleges.
I said it's not hugely less expensive. Reading is obviously not your strong point. The reason it's not hugely less expensive is because most students receive financial aid, meaning they DON'T ACTUALLY pay $32,000.
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superman19
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(Original post by Pink Bullets)
-In the US, you usually have to take classes in every general subject area. If you're only good at one subject, then you're unlikely to get a good final result.
What a complete waste of time.
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Pink Bullets
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(Original post by superman19)
What a complete waste of time.
Funnily enough, some people value being educated in more than one subject. What a crazy thought. :rolleyes:
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accountingmaniac2010
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(Original post by Pink Bullets)
I said it's not hugely less expensive. Reading is obviously not your strong point. The reason it's not hugely less expensive is because most students receive financial aid, meaning they DON'T ACTUALLY pay $32,000.
Good, you gave proof. Where does it say that international students get financial aid? So now the argument is between 3 k and 35 k...
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Pink Bullets
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(Original post by accountingmaniac2010)
Good, you gave proof. Where does it say that international students get financial aid? So now the argument is between 3 k and 35 k...
Who said anything about international students? And where did 35k come from?
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