Permenant Exclusion Watch

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*Tears and Butterflies*
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#1
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Is it true that Tony Blair wanted to cut the number of people permenantly excluded from schools so he dicouraged schools from doing so by increasing the cost of someone being permenantly excluded to £8000. If so what are your views on this?
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kellywood_5
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It wouldn't surprise me at all. It's already very difficult for state schools to expel pupils because often the decision gets overturned on appeal. It's absolutely ridiculous and is damaging the education of all those people who actually want to work in peace without morons disrupting their lessons all the time.
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*Tears and Butterflies*
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(Original post by kellywood_5)
It wouldn't surprise me at all. It's already very difficult for state schools to expel pupils because often the decision gets overturned on appeal. It's absolutely ridiculous and is damaging the education of all those people who actually want to work in peace without morons disrupting their lessons all the time.
Yeah I totally agree with you, we have a girl in my year who doesn't bother to do anything hardly ever, i dont know why she bothers coming. She is always swearing at teachers and having fights and sometimes comes into school drunk! I have been waiting three years to see if she will get expelled but she is still there! :p: It really isn't fair on the rest of the people who want to learn :mad:
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kellywood_5
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(Original post by lollie)
Yeah I totally agree with you, we have a girl in my year who doesn't bother to do anything hardly ever, i dont know why she bothers coming. She is always swearing at teachers and having fights and sometimes comes into school drunk! I have been waiting three years to see if she will get expelled but she is still there! :p: It really isn't fair on the rest of the people who want to learn :mad:
Well, that's Labour for you- pander to the lawless minority and screw over the law-abiding majority :rolleyes:
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Madprof
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This whole issue really bugs me. It seems 'problem children' are shunted from school to school, for example on the Eastside of Birmingham, disruptive children from one school were kicked out when a new head took over, and moved to other schools in the area. Now a second school has done the same, and others look set to follow, meaning the concentration of disruptive kids in the remaining schools will increase and increase.

The government needs to do far more to support 'pupil referal units' where, among others, childrem with bad behaviour study, away from other children who don't want to be distrupted.

This 'inclusive education' policy is really annoying me. The fact is that it won't work, because some children just can't deal with a classroom environment, for whatever reason, so they need to be removed from it for the sake of their education and others'.

/rant!

Sarah
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Arminius
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surely exclusion just dumps them on the streets or other schools.

This sounds.... radical but i seriously think some time in the army would do these morons the world of good. Theres no point just being nice to them and giving them easy work to do, show them that if they can't behave then they will be punished.
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MarcD
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(Original post by Zakatu)
surely exclusion just dumps them on the streets or other schools.

This sounds.... radical but i seriously think some time in the army would do these morons the world of good. Theres no point just being nice to them and giving them easy work to do, show them that if they can't behave then they will be punished.
This sounds like a good idea, certainly would knock some sense into them, and is slightly more humane than the cane, but still a firm enough punishment to teach disruptive kids a lesson.
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Madelyn
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At my school, virtually all appeals against permanent exclusion are unsuccessful. This is because we only expel when we absolutely have to and all other possibilities have been exhausted. It is expensive for schools to expel pupils - presumably to discourage schools from expelling pupils for minor or one-off incidents.
I'm actually a big fan of inclusive education, I think it's better to have everyone together. You're always going to be with a range of people, so why should schools not reflect this? As for disrupting lessons, most of the time such disruptions aren't sufficiently major or persistent to seriously hinder your ability to learn. If they are, then permanent exclusion - among other options - will be considered.
Is it really right to put all the excluded pupils together? While we're at it, why don't we move the Jews to Madagascar?
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*Tears and Butterflies*
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I actually think it is good that schools are not expelling people as often as they used to because it is moving the problem from one place to another, but there are some cases where people are just given too many chances. My school has a centre where they send disruptive pupils for 2-4 week where they are isolated from the main part of the school. When they are brought back to mainstream schooling their behaviour is usually improved. I think more schools should have a system like this.
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kellywood_5
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(Original post by lollie)
I actually think it is good that schools are not expelling people as often as they used to because it is moving the problem from one place to another, but there are some cases where people are just given too many chances. My school has a centre where they send disruptive pupils for 2-4 week where they are isolated from the main part of the school. When they are brought back to mainstream schooling their behaviour is usually improved. I think more schools should have a system like this.
We have an isolation room too, but it's not used that often and when it is, it's usually for pathetic reasons like having your hair too short or dying it :rolleyes:
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Comp_Genius
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(Original post by kellywood_5)
We have an isolation room too, but it's not used that often and when it is, it's usually for pathetic reasons like having your hair too short or dying it :rolleyes:
is that not allowed? :eek:
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kellywood_5
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(Original post by darkenergy)
is that not allowed? :eek:
No, which personally I think is completely ridiculous. I mean, how the hell does having short/dyed hair affect anything? OK, it's a breach of the uniform rules, but it doesn't merit being pulled out of lessons and missing valuable learning time to sit in a room doing work on your own with no teacher! The worst that should happen is a detention, in my opinion.
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Comp_Genius
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tbh I prefer learning on my own, some teachers in my school go over the simple stuff over and over again, so there is no time to study the difficult bits... and all they do is ask you to copy from a textbook anyway.
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Spondrah
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I never thought I'd say it but things were actually better when they had the cane! Today's society is well and truly screwed!
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Whizz Kid
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I hate problem students. It's students with learning difficulties who are ruining peoples' education. In my English class the teacher went over basic, and I mean basic grammar right before the exams instead of poetry which was much more important. She did this because of the retards who find school difficult, hence cause trouble and ruin it for everyone else. I hate them. Fair enough, most schools use "sets" to distinguish but no matter where, if it's state, you'll always have a [email protected] messing everything up. Put them on the street. The sooner they get into MaccyD's the better. Why try and stop the inevitable from happening? It's a waste of money keeping morons with bd in schools... Hate them.
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kellywood_5
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#16
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(Original post by Whizz Kid)
I hate problem students. It's students with learning difficulties who are ruining peoples' education. In my English class the teacher went over basic, and I mean basic grammar right before the exams instead of poetry which was much more important. She did this because of the retards who find school difficult, hence cause trouble and ruin it for everyone else. I hate them. Fair enough, most schools use "sets" to distinguish but no matter where, if it's state, you'll always have a [email protected] messing everything up. Put them on the street. The sooner they get into MaccyD's the better. Why try and stop the inevitable from happening? It's a waste of money keeping morons with bd in schools... Hate them.
I can see where you're coming from, but I don't think it's quite fair to say that; after all, people with learning difficulties have a disability, they didn't ask to be like that, so it's not their fault if they hold other people back or even disrupt lessons. My cousin has ADHD and goes to a special school, which I think is the best solution. These people still deserve a good education just like everyone else, but I don't think it's sensible to leave them in mainstream schooling.
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zxczxc
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To an extent "learning disabilities" really are just laziness. I'm yet to see an instance where dedication and hard work would not have seen (a degree of) success.
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Whizz Kid
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#18
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(Original post by kellywood_5)
I can see where you're coming from, but I don't think it's quite fair to say that; after all, people with learning difficulties have a disability, they didn't ask to be like that, so it's not their fault if they hold other people back or even disrupt lessons. My cousin has ADHD and goes to a special school, which I think is the best solution. These people still deserve a good education just like everyone else, but I don't think it's sensible to leave them in mainstream schooling.
I have ADHD and I deal with it (I don't even take medication!). It hasn't stopped me! Having ADHD isn't an excuse for causing havoc, I'm sorry! It's a disorder, fair enough but it's just a chemical deficiency - it doesn't MAKE people behave the way they do. You're right - if they can't handle their disorder they should be segregated - it's not fair on the others who can be taught without misbehaving.
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Whizz Kid
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(Original post by zxczxc)
To an extent "learning disabilities" really are just laziness. I'm yet to see an instance where dedication and hard work would not have seen (a degree of) success.
I don't recall ADHD being called Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder because people who suffer from it have a lack of energy... :rolleyes: Laziness is just a bad habit - pure and simple.
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Brown Eyed Girl
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#20
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there special places in areas were the really anoying most disruptives brats get sent. they usualy come out of it a bit better to when there back in normal school.

ALOT of people in my school should of been permenantly excluded... person i think the idiot that put me in hospital and fractured several of my ribs unprovoked should of been expelled.. but nope i had a forced apology...

my college has entire sections devoted to people with learning disabilities. they don't bother me in the least.
in school they did cause the people who could not speak english were put into a class then the teacher had to take twice as long to explain something
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