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    (Original post by !Laxy!)
    Basically for the top uni's the following subjects are sort of a 'no-go':

    Media
    Film
    Sociology
    Communications
    Drama
    Business Studies
    Law
    Thats not strictly true, what 'top uni's' and by that im really talking about Cambridge, 'generally' say in their admissions policy is that one of the 'non traditional' A levels (such as those above - drama, law, film etc) should be balanced out by two 'traditional' ones (English lit, history, maths, biology...) but you should check individual colleges to be sure.

    In the admissions policy Cambridge also seems to regard English Literature and language combined as highly as simply English Lit, by stating that either is applicable for BA English.
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    I am not sure: may be it is both non-traditional and respected. Both are not mutually exclusive.
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    (Original post by Adhsur)
    Not true. Philosophy A level is a respected A level unlike Law and Psychology.
    I really don't understand why some people don't respect philosophy, or religious studies (philosophy and ethics) for that matter. They both seem pretty difficult.
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    I am not sure, philosophy is not exactly a mickey mouse subject, like certain "*.* studies" subjects.
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    (Original post by darkenergy)
    I am not sure, philosophy is not exactly a mickey mouse subject, like certain "*.* studies" subjects.
    Exactly.

    Why anyone who is going to study philosophy at university would turn down the opportunity of doing a philosophy A level is beyond me.
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    (Original post by Adhsur)
    Exactly.

    Why anyone who is going to study philosophy at university would turn down the opportunity of doing a philosophy A level is beyond me.
    Plus it's a way of ensuring you actually like the subject since you're unlikely to have ever studied it before.
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    Can someone please tell me precisely what is supposed to be wrong with Law (if you're *not* considering law at university)? If you're applying for something like English or History, surely it's valuable in as much as it's an essay subject, you have to learn skills of analysis and writing 5 essays in 1 hour is no mean feat... Plus, the morals and ethical issues at A2 are valuable for any humanities course.

    Yeah I'll concede that a lot of Law AS basically consists of memorising a load of stuff then regurgitating it, and it's marked fairly easily as far as I can see (although this is apparently because they took 1/2 an hour off the time without changing to paper structure) - but surely the above positives give it some value? Anyway, I found history consisted basically of learning and regurgitating... A subject is what you make it; the reason I got a lot out of history and law was because I read around both of the subjects a lot.
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    if you're writing 5 essays in an hour they're not going to be particularly in-depth.

    Honestly, all the people I've spoken to who've done law a-level (well, and actually discussed it with me) have stated they felt it was a complete waste of time, on a par with general studies.
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    If you're writing five essays in an hour you're either superman, or don't know what an essay is.
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    Well I usually write 11-12 pages in an hour (and then allow my hand to drop off), so they were mini essays - not *that* hideously short.

    Well, I found it interesting if only for the heightened interest it gave me in current affairs, the way it increased my originally virtually non existent ability to be concise and stimulated some further reading

    It probably helps that I have a good teacher who really loves the subject and gives me extra work on more undergraduate level issues&standards - so perhaps I'm thinking more of the value of that than the actual course. But I'd still recommend it as an interesting and thought-provoking subject if you have 3 well respected subjects alongside it.
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    Yeah, but the point is you got to plan essays, do some thinking. So it'd be far less than an hour you actually have to write.

    Though it's true a good teacher can make any subject interesting and worthwhile.
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    True - but if you know a subject inside out, you can write non stop without pausing v often - I'm not big on planning, my teachers kept trying to force me to do it in English and Law in Jan, but I did it my way and it didn't hurt me. I see your point though - I think I spend a few minutes planning in history as oppose to virtually no time at all in law, so perhaps history is more demanding. I prefer history on the whole but that's basically cos I love it

    Teachers are so important. Unfortunately for me I'm a lazy so and so in many ways and my motivation often depends on how good my teachers are... so not looking forward to my French result
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    Eh... just... option B - btw with those options are they the only things offered or have you got rid of the other choices? For example I think a language would be great for politics in the future but either you're not too keen on them or they don't allow you to do it within the confines of the timetable. And I think definitely do philosophy because it would be interesting and good.. maybe theology would be more respected but if you can't stick with the philosophy - after all politics is a form of philosophy isn't it
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    (Original post by The Ace is Back)
    And I think definitely do philosophy because it would be interesting and good.. maybe theology would be more respected but if you can't stick with the philosophy - after all politics is a form of philosophy isn't it
    Well, depends. When you are discussing the merits of policies it certainly is all philosophy of sorts, even if it is so far removed from the basic principles that you're aiming for you can't even see them anymore. When you're just learning the mechanics of government, that's not philosophy.

    In any case it's easily argued that loads of subjects are "a form of philosophy".
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    (Original post by DemonDemonic)
    Well the Only way i can take History which i don't mind doing is if i take English Lang/Lit Instead of Lit.
    These are the subjects i don't mind doing in the Grids you'll see my problem

    Grid One
    History
    Enlish Lit
    Sociology (aparentley a waste)

    Grid Two
    English Lang Lit
    Law

    Grid Three
    Politics

    Grid Four
    Philosophy
    English Language

    So if i take history i have to do english lang lit rather than just lit is that a okay compramise concidering?
    I know someone who got into Oxford with Lang/Lit...don't worry...but definitely, definitely, take History...much better. If they ask why you didn't take Literature, explain that you couldn't take History (which is more relevant to your course), as well
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    You should have seen the faces of about 30% of 6th formers at the Ox Law Open day in 2004 when one of the tutors said that they do not like the Law A Level - it was clear those same 30% thought they had a great advantage over all the Hist/Eng students who obviously knew *nothing* about Law, and I think that this is the attitude which puts tutors off the qualification.

    After Politics AS I was beginning to think it did not deserve the higher status it seems to have over media studies etc - but the A2 is significantly harder; the difference between AS and A2 being greater than in other subjects.
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    (Original post by coldfish)
    Well, depends. When you are discussing the merits of policies it certainly is all philosophy of sorts, even if it is so far removed from the basic principles that you're aiming for you can't even see them anymore. When you're just learning the mechanics of government, that's not philosophy.

    In any case it's easily argued that loads of subjects are "a form of philosophy".
    Yeah but looking at his choices it seems the way - and besides doesn't politics at uni often cover political philosophy? Or not? I'm not entirely sure myself but I would have thought so, and so to have covered some basic philosophy might be helpful
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    Oh right, yeah it does. I thought what was meant was that politics A level is partially philosophy anyway and so he should take that and not worry about not doing philosophy A level.
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    At the beginning of AS i was still deciding whther to take an arts or sciences or business type route:

    Sciences + Maths is a kick arse combination and the one i originally applied to sixth-form for (was going to aim for natsci at cam but hey)

    ICT, Economics, History, Maths... also a kick arse combo. (Economics at LSE but hey)

    I finally threw all that away and decided for

    English Lit
    History (AS)
    Psychology
    Philosophy and Ethics

    Which they seemed to like for arts subjects. (Theology... but yay)

    And psychology is actually a very difficult subject that requires alot of work. So stop it lol.
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    (Original post by whauden)
    You should have seen the faces of about 30% of 6th formers at the Ox Law Open day in 2004 when one of the tutors said that they do not like the Law A Level - it was clear those same 30% thought they had a great advantage over all the Hist/Eng students who obviously knew *nothing* about Law, and I think that this is the attitude which puts tutors off the qualification.

    After Politics AS I was beginning to think it did not deserve the higher status it seems to have over media studies etc - but the A2 is significantly harder; the difference between AS and A2 being greater than in other subjects.
    Not what they said at Cambridge, I think it differs between admissions tutors aswell as universities.
 
 
 

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