Why Dont Oxford And Cambridge Make More Space?????? Watch

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dazmanultra
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#61
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If you're good enough to succeed in this life - it's irrelevent as to what university you end up at. You need to be determined and hard working whatever path in life you choose, and even if you do go to Oxford and Cambridge your life isn't then given to you on a plate from that moment on.

I know that I can succeed even though I did not go to Cambridge. Perhaps rejection will make you a stronger person, as in "Not everything will always go right for you in life" and you have to live with that fact, pick yourself up and get on with it. A good attitude will get you much farther in life than almost anything else.
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tomek J.
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I agree totally, I think those are the words of a wise man ;-)
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Allotriophagy
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#63
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Doesn't a "good attitude" simply make you rationalise every failure/bad decision/missed opportunity and put you in a position of false contentment?

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Alexander
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#64
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(Original post by Allotriophagy)
Doesn't a "good attitude" simply make you rationalise every failure/bad decision/missed opportunity and put you in a position of false contentment?
I think dazmanultra's idea of a good attitude is the exact opposite of that though -- not to be contented with what you've got, always strive for something better, and to try and rectify (rather than accept) every every failure/bad decision/missed opportunity etc.
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Allotriophagy
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Think you've read that into it, for some reason. What does "Perhaps rejection will make you a stronger person, as in "Not everything will always go right for you in life" and you have to live with that fact, pick yourself up and get on with it" seek to rectify, if it is not the blatant acceptance of circumstance?

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dreamer
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#66
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how about the fact that the 'just world' hypothesis that is consciously and subconsciously fed to us from birth is wrong, and that sometimes a rejection sharpens you up to this in a strong way.

Acceptance of circumstance: not necessarily. Rejection can act as a catalyst for never just accepting circumstances, but for working hard to maximise your chance of success regardless of what life throws at you. Thereby making you flexible, adaptable, and pushing you to take risks. Which is important.
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Alexander
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(Original post by Allotriophagy)
Think you've read that into it, for some reason. What does "Perhaps rejection will make you a stronger person, as in "Not everything will always go right for you in life" and you have to live with that fact, pick yourself up and get on with it" seek to rectify, if it is not the blatant acceptance of circumstance?

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Well, I was giving my interpretation of what dazmanultra said. BTW I don't agree with him altogether, as there can be little doubt that what university you go to does affect your chances of success in life.

However I believe the idea is that you should try to be as successful as possible wherever you do end up for uni, and I think it's a good one. And there probably is some truth in the idea that rejection makes someone stronger -- for example some Oxbridge undergraduates assume they will be able to walk into any job they like upon graduation (not entirely true, although there's something in it), whereas someone who was rejected might strive to make contacts and get relevant work experience and qualifications etc. A dent to self-confidence like an Oxbridge rejection can do good in the long-run; for example having been rejected I am thinking about reapplying, and if I do decide to then I will make sure I do everything possible to help me get in.
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dazmanultra
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(Original post by Allotriophagy)
Think you've read that into it, for some reason. What does "Perhaps rejection will make you a stronger person, as in "Not everything will always go right for you in life" and you have to live with that fact, pick yourself up and get on with it" seek to rectify, if it is not the blatant acceptance of circumstance?

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I didn't mean "acceptance" at all - perhaps I wasn't clear enough... I meant to say that getting in to Oxford or Cambridge should not stop someone who is clever and who has the right attitude from succeeding in life. I was rejected from Cambridge after interview. I was kinda sad at the time, but I got on with things and now I'm at KCL - having the time of my life.
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Allotriophagy
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All we need now is someone at Cam/Ox to say that going there was not the best decision and your points will be proved on both sides.

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yawn1
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(Original post by Allotriophagy)
All we need now is someone at Cam/Ox to say that going there was not the best decision and your points will be proved on both sides.

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Check out posts contributed by 'Damian Holt' - his forum pseudonym. He has often said exactly what you are suggesting. He is in his third year at Oxford for Maths and is extremely disillusioned.
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hildabeast
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(Original post by yawn1)
Check out posts contributed by 'Damian Holt' - his forum pseudonym. He has often said exactly what you are suggesting. He is in his third year at Oxford for Maths and is extremely disillusioned.
Well it's certainly not all its cracked up to be. The way people on this forum clamour to get in and make such a big deal about the whole thing really disturbs me. People need to lighten up :rolleyes:

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Brown Patrick Bateman
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(Original post by hildabeast)
Well it's certainly not all its cracked up to be.
I'd definitely say it is - the "Oxford experience" varies person to person hugely though.
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hildabeast
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#73
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(Original post by Jools)
I'd definitely say it is - the "Oxford experience" varies person to person hugely though.
Well the way people go on about it on this forum is really worrying. Getting in isn't necessarily a passport to a lifetime of success. Some people have a really anal attitude because they're Oxbridge students and think they're it, and its completely pathetic. For me the positives outweight the negatives but only just.

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TINNEY
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#74
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(Original post by hildabeast)
Well the way people go on about it on this forum is really worrying. Getting in isn't necessarily a passport to a lifetime of success. Some people have a really anal attitude because they're Oxbridge students and think they're it, and its completely pathetic. For me the positives outweight the negatives but only just.

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YES. AGREES.

IT ISNT BAD TO HAVE ASPIRATIONS AND WANT TO GO TO THE BEST UNIVERSITY - ITS HAVING HIGH AIMS AND TARGETS.

BUT U GOTTA BE REALISTIC - END OF THE DAY THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN GOING TO OXBRIDGE OR IMPERIAL IS HARDLY MUCH IS IT..................
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hildabeast
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(Original post by TINNEY)
YES. AGREES.

IT ISNT BAD TO HAVE ASPIRATIONS AND WANT TO GO TO THE BEST UNIVERSITY - ITS HAVING HIGH AIMS AND TARGETS.

BUT U GOTTA BE REALISTIC - END OF THE DAY THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN GOING TO OXBRIDGE OR IMPERIAL IS HARDLY MUCH IS IT..................
Precisely. As long as you have a good, well-respected degree, where you actually wnt to university doesn't make all that much difference at undergraduate level. Its only really at graduate level that the research quality of the department in which you study really starts to become important. I know that there are certain companies which like to recruit Oxbridge graduates because it is what they are used to and they are overly swayed by the prestige factor, but to be honest who would want to work for a company who thinks in that way? A solid degree from any good university should lead to a decent career.

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Brown Patrick Bateman
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(Original post by hildabeast)
Precisely. As long as you have a good, well-respected degree, where you actually wnt to university doesn't make all that much difference at undergraduate level.
Wherever you are, if you have the right attitude you'll go far. Warwick, London, Nottingham, Durham... all give you similar opportunities to get involved and/or a top degree.
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Alaric
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(Original post by Alexander)
However I think there may be something in what Maskall is saying (although I hate to say it) -- it's probably true that loads of the people whom Oxbridge turn away would have done well if they had got in, getting at least 2.1 degrees.
Maybe, maybe not.
It's not possible to tell because Cambridge don't compare their standards of degrees to those at other universities. In my subject (compsci) approximately 25% get firsts, 30% below that get 2:1s, 35% below that get 2:2s and the bottom 10% is usually a third or fail. Because your degree class is dependent on the other students it won't compare to other universities.
Oxbridge is designed to stretch those that walk through getting straight As, I know someone who was in tears during their first term because of how hard it was. They got 5 As at alevel and only dropped one GCSE down to A*, fact is they try and push you beyond the kind of rote learning you need to do for a-level. It's that you get tested at interview, they have a choice of lots of people with 4 or 5 A grades expected at a-level. They can choose someone who walked them without trouble or someone who worked hard, I know which I'd choose.

As for what grades got me into cam, AACCE at alevel isn't exactly good, so they must be looking for something more than grades... I still don't know why they've taken me but I may as well make the most of it.

Now I'll leave this by saying, sure there are mistakes, but interviews and extra tests are as good a way of deciding between those with lots of As as any other. If you've been rejected the other candidates may just be better, since most colleges only have a few places in each subject.

As for whether it's worth going to cambridge, it is for me, it suits my personality much better than the big ones like warwick and york etc. The collegiate system and the lack of nightlife but good pubs does suit some.

Alaric.
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