Would you pay £9,000 for a university degree?

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Linda
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#21
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#21
Yes. But since I'm an international I have to pay about £8000 a year anyways.
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LH
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#22
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#22
The best is my cousin's course at Bath - BBA. You have two six-month placements, one in 2nd year and one in 3rd. They get paid for these placements. Most are about £14k-£18k pa so are £7k - £9k pro rata, and the second placement usually pays more. So you could earn more than £20k when doing this degree - though you have to pay for your own living costs when at the placements.
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vavavoom
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#23
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#23
I have to...for Psychology it's 10,300 a year.....
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yawn1
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#24
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#24
The cost of a degree will be far more than £9,000 when you have to consider the costs of accommodation, books (horrendously expensive) and living costs. If you do a 4 year course, which more and more are doing just to be in with a chance of employment in increasingly competitive market because of saturation with graduates, it will 25% more. You're looking at £30,000 minimum.
Jobs are not plentiful for those wishing to find work related to their choice of degree if their degree is in the Arts or Humanities - which means that pay prospects are not great.
Have you thought about how difficult it is going to be to have essentially, an education mortgage around your neck whilst trying to raise a family, buy a house and provide for a retirement pension? Many people are struggling to do that without the additional encumbrance of an education mortgage.
In comparing our proposed uni fees with those in USA - the great majority of US undergraduates have to stagger their degrees by working to earn money for more classes and then working again for the next lot. They can take up to 10 years to graduate. It's only the very wealthy or the very poor but gifted who don't have these fragmented degree courses.
In Australia only the wealthy can afford to attend the most prestigious unis as the general populace are priced out of that market. This year their university fees are to rise by 25%!
These illustrations are what will happen to us within a few years - make no mistake on that.
Whilst I agree that more monies need to be found to educate us I feel the best place to find this money is from the very wealthy i.e. £100,000 pa +. Since 1979 people in this income range (allowing for inflation of course) have enjoyed a tax rate much lower in comparison to their gross income than the general public. They have become increasingly more wealthy as the gap has widened. I believe they have a moral responsibility to ensure an equitable education for all the next generation. In time, when that next generation achieve the heights of earning power, in turn, they reciprocate.
As an additional aspect to this debate what are your views on the worth of your degree to society - do you think you should pay more is your degree is of little value to the country and less if your degree is of benefit to society?
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dazmanultra
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#25
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A graduate already earns on average £500,000 more over a lifetime than a non-graduate, thus will probably pay around half of that in various taxes. VAT on everything bought, income tax, duty on fuel and alcohol probably adds up to another £250,000-£300,000 taxes paid on average by a graduate. So we already pay for our university education and then some!
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mjf
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#26
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#26
Do you feel though that degrees such as medicine, dentistry and veterinary medicine where you will eventually be looking after the nations interests you should be paying so much? I mean, you have to work damn hard to get into to a university that offers these degrees, so that you can provide a service to the country and how it operates..., just look at how foot and mouth affected us. I think that degrees that entail 5/6 years and then provide a service to the public should in no way pay the same as someone doing a Dance and Media degree! Just a thought...
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Lurker
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#27
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#27
(Original post by corey)
why should the dustman further subsidise the doctor? If its going to come from anywhere it should be from the person receiving the private benefit.
Because dustmen benefit from doctors as much as anyone else.
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mjf
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#28
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#28
(Original post by Lurker)
Because dustmen benefit from doctors as much as anyone else.
Exactly...
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AT82
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#29
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#29
(Original post by dazmanultra)
A graduate already earns on average £500,000 more over a lifetime than a non-graduate, thus will probably pay around half of that in various taxes. VAT on everything bought, income tax, duty on fuel and alcohol probably adds up to another £250,000-£300,000 taxes paid on average by a graduate. So we already pay for our university education and then some!
Exactly!! Another thing is as well is that if you earn more you will probably have more desposable income thus greater purchase power. This means that you will buying more goods and paying more VAT.

Not to mention like you mentioned we will be paying more income tax too than non-graduates.

The twist I will say is that graduate earnings will probably not that much higher than non grads in the future because the gap is slowly closing. But new research released this year suggests even depsite the fact they are lot more graduates graduate salaries still rise much faster than non grads.
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yawn1
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#30
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#30
(Original post by dazmanultra)
A graduate already earns on average £500,000 more over a lifetime than a non-graduate, thus will probably pay around half of that in various taxes. VAT on everything bought, income tax, duty on fuel and alcohol probably adds up to another £250,000-£300,000 taxes paid on average by a graduate. So we already pay for our university education and then some!
These figures are out of date - just updated with inflationary figures to support the governments argument about top-up fees that they will press ahead with regardless.
There is no way a projectionary, correct estimate can be given to cover a lifetime's earnings for current undergrads and more importantly future students who will be subject to the top-ups from 2006. This is because things are changing drastically, more people are starting their working career as graduates and they are becoming two-a-penny - just like A*/A grade GCSE's and A grade A levels. This negates the 'uniqueness' and consequently the earning potential of graduates.
The elements of taxation you mention are paid by all tax-payers so are irrelant to the equation.
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MurphysMoment.
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#31
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#31
I don't see why people should pay to be educated, in performing our skills as engineers, doctors and teachers we are helping the economy and retaining this countries great status; why the hell should we young people pay £9000 for that?

The simple answer is University is not for everyone; not everyone needs a degree and 50% of the population going there is an absolute joke; I say cut the numbers being allowed to enter University and get rid of all these ponce subjects like Media Studies and Dance; then we won't have any of this under funding *******s.
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AT82
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#32
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#32
(Original post by yawn1)
These figures are out of date - just updated with inflationary figures to support the governments argument about top-up fees that they will press ahead with regardless.
There is no way a projectionary, correct estimate can be given to cover a lifetime's earnings for current undergrads and more importantly future students who will be subject to the top-ups from 2006. This is because things are changing drastically, more people are starting their working career as graduates and they are becoming two-a-penny - just like A*/A grade GCSE's and A grade A levels. This negates the 'uniqueness' and consequently the earning potential of graduates.
The elements of taxation you mention are paid by all tax-payers so are irrelant to the equation.

Graduates will always earn more than none graduates on average even if the gap is closing. However the latest research suggests that this gap is widening and graduates are increasingly in more demand. The problem is not that there are too many graduates competing for jobs, the problem is that so there are so many graduates none graduates are finding it much harder to get good jobs.

The more you earn the more tax you pay.

Also you can't get rid of courses like dance or media as there needs to be diversity in education no matter how much micky mouse these courses seem.
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Lurker
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#33
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#33
(Original post by amazingtrade)
Also you can't get rid of courses like dance or media as there needs to be diversity in education no matter how much micky mouse these courses seem.
Of course education needs to be diverse - but there are many different ways of being educated, and a degree is just one. Why should people feel they have to get a degree in Media Studies or Dance just to get a job?
You don't need a degree in Dance to be a dancer, you don't need a degree in Media to, for example, be a journalist.
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MurphysMoment.
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#34
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#34
You need a degree in something respectable to do journalism like English.
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