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    (Original post by soulsussed)
    So dyselxic people are thick and haven't any academic capablities? How ignorant can you get! I know some dylexic people who are perfectly capable of achieving A grades at GCSE. Do you even know what dyslexia is?

    Oh yeah and I saw the little 'no offence' note, but it didn't wash.
    lmao
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    i would make a joke, but not laugh at them.
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    (Original post by chewwy)
    at least i'm honest. i'd prefer to let myself be wholly known than to hide in the shadows and let my worries about offending someone else ruin my own day...
    Well I'd prefer to put my friends first, because at the end of the day, there the most important thing to me, and I know that they'll support me no matter what grades I get, so I feel I should return the favour.
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    i would probably say, its a minor, well done, you tried your best.
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    (Original post by rico dan man)
    i would probably say, its a minor, well done, you tried your best.
    I'd be careful about saying something like that. You don't want to sound patronising, even if you do mean well.

    Michael
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    btw can someone fully describe to me the full effects of dyslexia please. like does it make it harder for you to spell/write or more? i know veryy little on the subject...shame on me coz' i know dyslexic people but they seem fine most of the time.
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    jus say good for ya.
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    (Original post by rico dan man)
    i would probably say, its a minor, well done, you tried your best.
    that wouldnt sound right.
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    Oi yehh .. my classmate Amy was dyslexic but shes leavin 2 go to another sixh form now... and all her target grades were As and above.. in regards 2 the posts i wudnt say anything because i hve 8 m8s in my group there r a few really good 1s who r predicted all as n a*s.. tbqh im the one wholl b getin the rubbish grades!and ther r a few around my level whatever happens.. wen we r all standin in that hall on the 25th.. damn me if im gna say anything to praise 1 of them wen the others feel bad... i will leave the situation 2 cool and say nothing.... sometimes staying quite about it is the best policy! i hope this advice is to ur liking..and good luck to all of u gettin ur results on the 25th! .. i have a psychotic german teacher expecting me 2 get an a*..grrr...shel probz follow me around until i open my envelope bt wat the hey!
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    i would say that especially if i knew they worked for it. if they did not work for it, then i probably say "seen" or "ok" and would not make anything of it.
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    Why don't you, rather than actually saying the grades you got, say something like, "I did pretty good" and then ask her..and then she'll be encouraged to say something similar rather than her actual grades.

    Another option is you could say what I said above, but then just not ask her how she did. Some people don't even want to tell people their results anyway.
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    If my friend achieved what she was predicted or better, I would tell her that I was very pleased for her, that she worked hard, that she really deserved them.

    If my friend was disappointed in his or her results, got less than what she had anticipated, I'd tell her I was sorry, that it's not the end of the world and that there'll be other chances to "prove" herself academically.

    Fortunately, my friends are all predicted to achieve A*-C grades in their subjects.

    On the topic of dyslexia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dyslexia
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    I was that girl ! hehe. I completely froze during most of my GCSE exams and got bad!!! grades (C,C,C,D,D,D,D,D,E,E). Which was a bit of a blow when i was expected A's to B's. Its not the end of the world !. I have spent the last year re taking my GCSE's and have really enjoyed it (suprising huh!) I am now predicted A*'s to C's (c, because my english teacher never puts a resit into higher). I am completly confident and I have grew a little on the way. So just tell your friend not to worry

    Laura x
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    Whenever i'm confronted with this situation i always ask, 'Are you happy with that?' because even people with Bs might be disappointed they didn't get As or people with Ds happy they didn't get Es. That way you get a response from the person, yeah i'm really pleased, or i wish i did a bit better in x, which allows you to give a more appropriate response. xx
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    (Original post by thebadboy2k1)
    btw can someone fully describe to me the full effects of dyslexia please. like does it make it harder for you to spell/write or more? i know veryy little on the subject...shame on me coz' i know dyslexic people but they seem fine most of the time.
    It just means that they have to be taught differently because they see thing back to front (its the way their brain works) they can't learn to read and write how the schools these days teach, they need to learn with sounds (how they used to teach and proposing to go back to).

    My brother who is dyslexic also doesn't really have a very long attention span, he has been taught properly but I think its appauling that my parents had to find out for themselves that he is dyselxic and then have to pay alot of money so that he can be taught by specialist teachers.Dyselia is just a learning need, it just means that the student has to be taught in a different way. If my brother hadn't had his needs met then he would be a disruptive member of the class with poor grades and would probably leave scjoold believe he's thick and inept. Their are alot of learning needs, some that have't even been discovered, dyselexia's just one of them, and dyselxic people can be extremly clever gifted and talented people.

    (can't spell dyslexic, sorry)
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    (Original post by mousey)
    Whenever i'm confronted with this situation i always ask, 'Are you happy with that?' because even people with Bs might be disappointed they didn't get As or people with Ds happy they didn't get Es. That way you get a response from the person, yeah i'm really pleased, or i wish i did a bit better in x, which allows you to give a more appropriate response. xx
    Yeah, you would try and read them to see if they are pleased with their grade. It's not really the grade that matters, its whether they've achieve what they wanted to achieve.
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    Hmm.. tricky. I probaly say 'well done!!' if i knew they tried really hard but if its a person who didnt really care about their GCSEs then i wouldnt really say 'you tried your best, well done' .
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    (Original post by soulsussed)
    It just means that they have to be taught differently because they see thing back to front (its the way their brain works) they can't learn to read and write how the schools these days teach, they need to learn with sounds (how they used to teach and proposing to go back to).
    sometimes. though most of those studying dsylexia accept it's not a very homogenous condition - some see words moving around, for some they shake, for some they look fine etc.

    My brother who is dyslexic also doesn't really have a very long attention span, he has been taught properly but I think its appauling that my parents had to find out for themselves that he is dyselxic and then have to pay alot of money so that he can be taught by specialist teachers.
    attention span isn't a symptom or diagnostic criteria, but might be a comorbid disorder or consequence of the dyslexia & becomming frustrated or something?
    i agree, that is a shame about the lack of awareness in teachers, though.

    Dyselia is just a learning need, it just means that the student has to be taught in a different way.
    or sometimes medical approaches such as coloured glasses have been shown to help, rather than necessarily depending on phonetic teaching. it depends on the subtype.

    but basically i think it's defined as a reading/spelling ability that has a large discrepancy to IQ. i.e. people of normal intelligence who have specific problems with reading & spelling. & it seems remarkable widespread at ~10% of the population. if anyone wants more links or anything, let me know.. :p:
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    (Original post by Divine89)
    How would you have reacted?

    A Friend: Hey, how did you do?
    Me: I got 5A*'s and 4A's. How did you do?
    A Friend: I got 5C's and 4D's
    Me: {Fill in the blank}

    Ouch. What do you do? What do you say? what if you don't mean it?
    i got v.high gcse results so i had that happen to me quite a lot. i found the best thing was to alter the conversation entirely, thus:

    friend: how did you do?

    me: fine, i was happy. you?

    friend: i got 5Cs and 4Ds.

    me: great, well done.
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    (Original post by soulsussed)
    It just means that they have to be taught differently because they see thing back to front (its the way their brain works) they can't learn to read and write how the schools these days teach, they need to learn with sounds (how they used to teach and proposing to go back to).

    My brother who is dyslexic also doesn't really have a very long attention span, he has been taught properly but I think its appauling that my parents had to find out for themselves that he is dyselxic and then have to pay alot of money so that he can be taught by specialist teachers.Dyselia is just a learning need, it just means that the student has to be taught in a different way. If my brother hadn't had his needs met then he would be a disruptive member of the class with poor grades and would probably leave scjoold believe he's thick and inept. Their are alot of learning needs, some that have't even been discovered, dyselexia's just one of them, and dyselxic people can be extremly clever gifted and talented people.

    (can't spell dyslexic, sorry)
    thanks for taking the time out to reply
 
 
 

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