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    (Original post by Elles)


    sometimes. though most of those studying dsylexia accept it's not a very homogenous condition - some see words moving around, for some they shake, for some they look fine etc.



    attention span isn't a symptom or diagnostic criteria, but might be a comorbid disorder or consequence of the dyslexia & becomming frustrated or something?
    i agree, that is a shame about the lack of awareness in teachers, though.



    or sometimes medical approaches such as coloured glasses have been shown to help, rather than necessarily depending on phonetic teaching. it depends on the subtype.

    but basically i think it's defined as a reading/spelling ability that has a large discrepancy to IQ. i.e. people of normal intelligence who have specific problems with reading & spelling. & it seems remarkable widespread at ~10% of the population. if anyone wants more links or anything, let me know.. :p:
    lol and thanks for correcting any anomalies you may have noticed.
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    (Original post by thebadboy2k1)
    thanks for taking the time out to reply
    S'alright
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    If we both did worse than we had expected, then I would have just gone "Who cares, we still have another chance at A levels."
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    (Original post by soulsussed)
    So dyselxic people are thick and haven't any academic capablities? How ignorant can you get! I know some dylexic people who are perfectly capable of achieving A grades at GCSE. Do you even know what dyslexia is?

    Oh yeah and I saw the little 'no offence' note, but it didn't wash.

    i know people with dyslexia that have got A*'s before. The cleverest girl in my school is dyslexic, and two of my friends are also very bright and are dyslexic. My friend only has a problem with spelling, and in most, if not all GCSE's it's not taken into account too much (not sure about English though). My brother is also dyslexic but he is still a mathematical genius (well, for an 11 year old anyway).
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    (Original post by soulsussed)
    My brother who is dyslexic also doesn't really have a very long attention span, he has been taught properly but I think its appauling that my parents had to find out for themselves that he is dyselxic and then have to pay alot of money so that he can be taught by specialist teachers.

    same with my brother. They only found out when he was 9, even though the teacher had recognised symptoms for over two years. The school doesn't tell parents if they suspect their child is dyslexic, because they cannot fund the special test and teaching.

    My Mum couldn't work out why his English SAT was so much lower than Maths and Science, so she read a book on dyslexia and realised he might have it. So we had to take him to a special centre to have a test for £120 and now he has a lesson a week at £18 for 45 minutes.

    I think it's awful that some schools leave it up to the parents, because it is very expensive, and some families would have to save up to so they could let their child take the test.

    I realise this is my second post on dyslexia, so I'll stop now
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    (Original post by isabella19)
    same with my brother. They only found out when he was 9, even though the teacher had recognised symptoms for over two years. The school doesn't tell parents if they suspect their child is dyslexic, because they cannot fund the special test and teaching.

    My Mum couldn't work out why his English SAT was so much lower than Maths and Science, so she read a book on dyslexia and realised he might have it. So we had to take him to a special centre to have a test for £120 and now he has a lesson a week at £18 for 45 minutes.

    I think it's awful that some schools leave it up to the parents, because it is very expensive, and some families would have to save up to so they could let their child take the test.

    I realise this is my second post on dyslexia, so I'll stop now
    My mum started looking into it when we found all of his sat results were well under what they should be, and it was also comments from the teachers. He didn't concentrate well in class. The teachers will have kind of known I'm sure but they're not trained to recognise it so as far as we were concerned they didn't have the foggiest. Well my brother moved school, and has been attending a 'dyslexia institute' once a week that has specialist teachers, they're really goods because its one to one, its better than school in some ways because its boosts his esteem as well. He's just taken his yr 6 sats and got 544, same as me but with the 5 in science (my 5 in english), he'd have done much worse without the extra teaching, and he enjoys his education.

    Some families simply wouldn't be able to afford it, or they wouldn't pick up on it at all, meaning the child stays in normal education becoming more and more disruptive, their education digressing with their self esteem. Eventually they're labelled as thick and leave school believing so, which is an incredible shame bearing in mind how talented dyslexic people can be.

    But yeah we should stop posting on dyslexia, no ones complained yet.
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    Just to put this in context:

    5 Cs and 4 Ds actually puts a candidate in the top ranking group for Secondary School League tables!

    Extract from:

    http://www.dfes.gov.uk/performanceta...04/sec3a.shtml


    "The published percentages indicate the percentage of students at the school that have achieved the equivalent of 5 or more GCSE A*-C grades or 5 or more GCSE A*-G grades..."

    Aitch
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    Tough situation. I would advise a short conversation, something along the lines of:

    A Friend: Hey, how did you do?
    Me: I got 5A*'s and 4A's. How did you do?
    A Friend: I got 5C's and 4D's
    Me: Cool. I was really worried about getting my results, but I'm so glad the both of us have passed! Feels great doesn't it?

    Try to make them feel like they have actually achieved something (which they have of course). Make it a quick conversation and depending on what type of person they are, offer to do something which they like - i.e. get pissed, go see a movie, go for a walk in the park and talk etc...
    It's really not worth worrying about, because these situations usually sort themselves and your friend won't be expecting you to tone down your glee and content in exchange for their results. Don't worry. You have to remember that it is your day as well as your friends - you are allowed to enjoy your results, as you have worked for them, as has your friend. Hope that helped, gl.
 
 
 

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