grammar question. Watch

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Aitch
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#41
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#41
(Original post by Gaz031)
I also have a question... Which is the correct way to state a quote?
'Insert quote here'. or 'Insert quote here.'
Thanks.
Lots of us would prefer "Insert quotation here."

I know I'm pedantic, but I find this shorthand use of the verb for the noun a bit of an irritate.

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SamTheMan
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#42
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#42
(Original post by Trousers)
Not if you're writing 'he said' afterwards, because the sentence doesn't end at the end of the quoted words.
But the quote is a sentence itself...
ummmm I'm confusing myself here.
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Aitch
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#43
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#43
(Original post by Aitch)
Lots of us would prefer "Insert quotation here."

I know I'm pedantic, but I find this shorthand use of the verb for the noun a bit of an irritate.

Aitch
... and it's quite interesting to look back through the thread and spot those who can't bring themselves to noun the word quote!

Aitch

The price of pedantry is eternal vigilance.
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SilverWings
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#44
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#44
(Original post by Phonicsdude)
Wrong.
The punctuation mark goes outside the quotation marks if it is part of the sentence.
e.g. `He came up to me and said "you bas***d", so I hit him.
OR
'I hit him because he came up to me and said "you ***tar*".

If the full stop is part of the quotation, and not the sentence, then it comes inside the quotation marks.

e.g. This bloke came up to me and said, "You will never be a fishman."
So it is correct to write something like this: ??

There was a bloke. The bloke came up to me and said, "I don't like you, you will never be a fishman.". I nodded at him.

Because that was the end of the sentance in the speech, and the end of the whole sentance... :confused:
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Fleece
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#45
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#45
(Original post by Manatee)
Probably too late to be of any use, but here goes:

"members' cats" (if more than one member)

"member's cats" (if one member only)



Good lord. "Members's cats" is most definitely wrong. Unless the cats belong to someone called Members, in which case "Members's cats" is, I believe, technically correct.
No....he was asking about which plural was correct...not which was singular and which was plural.
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Aitch
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#46
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#46
(Original post by SW)
So it is correct to write something like this: ??

There was a bloke. The bloke came up to me and said, "I don't like you, you will never be a fishman.". I nodded at him.

Because that was the end of the sentance in the speech, and the end of the whole sentance... :confused:

Since you will never see this configuration of punctuation elsewhere, you can say that if you choose to use it, it will be wrong, or (at best!) a personal idiosyncrasy...

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SilverWings
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#47
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#47
(Original post by Aitch)
Since you will never see this configuration of punctuation elsewhere, you can say that if you choose to use it, it will be wrong, or (at best!) a personal idiosyncrasy...

Aitch
So what is correct?? :confused:

And whats idiosyncrasy?? :eek:
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Aitch
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#48
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#48
(Original post by SW)
So what is correct?? :confused:

And whats idiosyncrasy?? :eek:
If you want to get it right virtually all of the time, put the ,. inside the quotation marks.

An idiosycrasy is an instance of peculiar behaviour, for example, always putting some size 1 text after your name at the end of a post.

Aitch

[Idiosyncratic, moi?]
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Trousers
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#49
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#49
(Original post by SamTheMan)
But the quote is a sentence itself...
ummmm I'm confusing myself here.
Yes, you are confusing yourself.

If you're continuing the original sentence after the quotation, don't worry about this. Many quotations are full sentences, but to stick a full stop in the middle, before 'he said', wouldn't make any sense.
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Trousers
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#50
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#50
(Original post by SW)
So it is correct to write something like this: ??

There was a bloke. The bloke came up to me and said, "I don't like you, you will never be a fishman.". I nodded at him.

Because that was the end of the sentance in the speech, and the end of the whole sentance... :confused:
You don't need two full stops. Just the first one will do.

The basic rule is actually quite logical: when the punctuation relates to the quoted words it goes inside the speech marks. When it doesn't, it goes outside. And you only need one full stop at the end of every sentence.
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SilverWings
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#51
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#51
(Original post by Trousers)
You don't need two full stops. Just the first one will do.

The basic rule is actually quite logical: when the punctuation relates to the quoted words it goes inside the speech marks. When it doesn't, it goes outside. And you only need one full stop at the end of every sentence.
But my second fullstop related to a different sentance...

I nodded at him was a seperate sentance...
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Trousers
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#52
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#52
(Original post by Aitch)
... and it's quite interesting to look back through the thread and spot those who can't bring themselves to noun the word quote!

Aitch

The price of pedantry is eternal vigilance.
Argh! I only did it because everyone else was doing it!

Will throw myself off bridge now.
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Aitch
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#53
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#53
(Original post by Trousers)
Argh! I only did it because everyone else was doing it!

Will throw myself off bridge now.

No need to river yourself just because you've nouned a verb...

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Trousers
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#54
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#54
(Original post by SW)
But my second fullstop related to a different sentance...

I nodded at him was a seperate sentance...
Well, yes and no.

If the quoted phrase is a full sentence on its own, and it happens to come at the end of the original sentence, the punctuation at the end serves to finish both sentences off. Otherwise, your writing would look messy and complicated.
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Fleece
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#55
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#55
(Original post by Aitch)
No need to river yourself just because you've nouned a verb...

Aitch
verbing a noun eh.....
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Manatee
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#56
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#56
(Original post by Fleece)
No....he was asking about which plural was correct...not which was singular and which was plural.
The original posts didn't make it completely clear - I was just making sure that every possibility was covered.
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