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    anglia poly
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    Trinity is minted - owns Cambridge Science Park aswell as Felixstowe Docks among other bits and pieces... :eek:
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    (Original post by Veedy)
    I've never been to Cam., but judging from everything I've heard/read/seen, I would choose one of Gonville and Caius or Trinity. Probably Gonville and Caius, due to all the tradition there
    hehe, people wanting to go to Caius must be mad
    They make you buy meal tickets for the term in advance and have a crazy formal hall that you can't book (so you can arrive and be turned away with no food), is widely regarded to be the least pleasant of the formal halls... but it is well attended... probably because you've already paid for it.
    Their bar is nice and cosy though... and they are a pretty rich college.

    Christ's for academic, well possibly, from what I've heard from people at Christ's though they seem a little too keen on staying near the top... so there's a lot of pressure to do well.

    Personally I'm going to say the best (for me at least) is Clare. It's about the right size - Trinity is too big to know everyone - it has beautiful gardens on the river, the first year accomodation is very nice, the cellars (JCR) are very nice and now they have a coffee machine behind the bar, and most of all... we're the friendly college
    But then, I can hardly give an unbiased opinion!

    But the others I regard to be very nice are Kings, Queens, Emma (and for compsci also Trinity Hall).
    Ultimately you're likely to be happy wherever you end up in cam, unless it's girton and you don't cycle - which would be a real pain.

    So, umm, yes, Clare is the best.

    Alaric.
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    Churchill
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    Peterhouse or Caius.
    • Thread Starter
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    I remember Kings' looks absolutely amazing from outside, almost like the houses of parliament.

    Also, how good are those oxbridge league tables for judging the calibre of a college?
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    (Original post by Seer)
    Also, how good are those oxbridge league tables for judging the calibre of a college?
    Not very good, in my opinion. Everyone has different priorities when choosing a college so its definitely best to go and look around a few of them to make an informed decision. The Norrington and Topkins tables are supposedto rank colleges in terms of academic performance but they usee a fairly crude numerical system in order to do this. Often the difference between the colleges can come down to only a couple of people getting 2:1s instead of firsts and can fluctuate drastically from year to year.

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    (Original post by hildabeast)
    Not very good, in my opinion. Everyone has different priorities when choosing a college so its definitely best to go and look around a few of them to make an informed decision. The Norrington and Topkins tables are supposedto rank colleges in terms of academic performance but they usee a fairly crude numerical system in order to do this. Often the difference between the colleges can come down to only a couple of people getting 2:1s instead of firsts and can fluctuate drastically from year to year.

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    And don't forget that they get their statistics from the results board (which anyone in the University can see) and some students request that their results be kept private. Besides, it doesn't matter which college you go to: as long as you're bright enough you'll do well wherever you go.
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    Clare for definite!!! gorgeous gardens, v up and coming social (like emma, i know!! lol) and not snobby like johns or trinity, on the river and next to kings chapel, what more do i have to say!!
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    (Original post by Allotriophagy)
    You do mean "Chariots of Fire", yeah? That was Christ Church!

    The wedding cake...let me find a photo...

    http://www.joh.cam.ac.uk/General/Col...eg/newct1.jpeg

    There you go!

    a.
    *
    I thought it was Gonville and Caius... Really, they drink to Caius and on the back cover of the dvd it say "the Caius men (...)".
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    Movie Review
    by Frederic Brussat

    Chariots of Fire
    Hugh Hudson
    Warner 01/81 VHS/DVD
    PG

    (...) At the train station, the new students are helped with their luggage by two veterans of World War I. Later, at Caius College, Harold (Ben Cross) reveals both defensiveness and self-confidence when a porter patronizes him. He and Aubrey are worlds apart in background and personal style (...)
    The master of Caius hall (Lindsay Anderson) welcomes the new class, the first one to follow those who died in World War I. On their behalf, he urges them "to examine yourselves, assess your true potential, seek to discover where your true chance of greatness lies." Following a student societies fair, Harold stuns everyone by challenging the Trinity Court Dash (...)

    from http://www.spiritualityhealth.com/ne...item_5059.html
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    Trinity is the best college, look at this list of people who have attended Trinity:

    # George Gascoigne 1525-1577 Poet, dramatist - Jocasta, The Glasse of Government
    # John Dee 1527-1608 Alchemist, geographer, mathematician
    # Edward Coke 1552-1634 Lawyer, politician; Chief Justice of the King's Bench
    # Francis Bacon 1561-1626 Lawyer, philosopher; Lord Chancellor
    # Henry Spelman 1562-1641 Antiquary - 'Reliquiae Spelmannianae'
    # John Coke 1563-1644 politician
    # Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex 1566-1601 Soldier, courtier to Elizabeth I; executed for rebellion
    # Giles Fletcher 1588-1623 Poet - Christ's Victory and Triumph
    # George Herbert 1593-1633 Poet - The Temple; MP (Montgomery)
    # Thomas Randolph 1605-1635 Poet, dramatist
    # John Suckling (poet) 1609-1642 Poet, dramatist
    # John Pell 1610-1685 Mathematician
    # Abraham Cowley 1618-1667 Poet, dramatist - The Mistress
    # Andrew Marvell 1621-1678 Poet -'Horatian Ode', The Rehearsal Transpros'd; MP (Hull)
    # George Villiers, 2nd Duke of Buckingham 1628-1687 Wit, politician, dramatist - The Rehearsal; member of the 'Cabal'
    # Vilayanur S. Ramachandran, neuroscientist and psychologist
    # John Ray 1627-1705 Naturalist; created the principles of plant classification
    # John Dryden 1631-1700 Poet Laureate -Absalom and Achitophel; Translator of Virgil
    # Francis Willughby 1635-1672 Naturalist
    # Isaac Newton 1642-1727 Mathematician, physicist; MP (Cambridge University)
    # George Jeffreys 1645-1689 Judge - 'Bloody Assizes'; Lord Chancellor
    # Nathaniel Lee 1649-1692 Dramatist - The Rival Queens
    # Charles Montagu, 1st Duke of Manchester (1656-1722) Whig statesman
    # Charles Montagu, 1st Earl of Halifax 1661-1715 Founded Bank of England, 1694; Chancellor of Exchequer
    # Charles Seymour, 6th Duke of Somerset 1662-1748 Politician and Whig Grandee
    # George Montague-Dunk, 2nd Earl of Halifax 1716-1771 Secretary of State
    # John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich 1718-1792 First Lord of the Admiralty; invented the 'sandwich'
    # Richard Cumberland 1732-1811 Playwright - The Brothers, The West Indian
    # Thomas Nelson 1738-1789 Signatory of the American Declaration of Independence
    # Thomas Erskine, 1st Lord Erskine 1750-1823 Lord Chancellor, jurist
    # George Crabbe 1754-1832 Poet; did not matriculate
    # Richard Porson 1759-1808 Classical scholar
    # Spencer Perceval 1762-1812 Prime Minister 1809-1812 (Tory); assassinated
    # Charles Grey, 2nd Earl Grey 1764-1845 Prime Minister 1830-1834 (Whig); Great Reform Act (1832)
    # Francis Russell, 5th Duke of Bedford 1765-1802 Whig aristocrat
    # John Singleton Copley, 1st Lord Lyndhurst 1772-1863 Lawyer; Lord Chancellor 1827-1830; 1834-1835; 1841-1846
    # William Lamb, 2nd Viscount Melbourne 1779-1848 Prime Minister 1834, 1835-1841 (Whig)
    # Henry Petty-Fitzmaurice, 3rd Marquess of Lansdowne 1780-1863 Whig statesman
    # Charles Pepys, 1st Earl of Cottenham 1781-1851 lawyer, Lord Chancellor 1846-1850
    # John Charles Spencer, 3rd Earl Spencer 1782-1845 Known as Lord Althorp; Chancellor of the Exchequer
    # Henry Goulburn 1784-1856 Chancellor of the Exchequer
    # Adam Sedgwick 1785-1873 Geologist
    # George Gordon Byron, 6th Baron Byron 1788-1824 Poet - `She Walks in Beauty', Don Juan
    # Charles Babbage 1791-1871 Mathematician; Built the forerunner of modern computers
    # Constantine Henry Phipps, 1st Marquess of Normanby 1797-1863 Politician
    # Thomas Babington Macaulay 1800-1859 Historian, essayist
    # William Henry Fox Talbot 1800-1877 Inventor of photography
    # George Airy 1801-1895 Astronomer, geophysicist
    # William Smith O'Brien 1803-1864 Irish Nationalist
    # Edward George Bulwer-Lytton 1803-1873 Novelist - The Last Days of Pompeii; politician
    # James Challis 1803-1882 Astronomer; twice observed Neptune without noting it, before its discovery
    # Frederick D Maurice 1805-1872 Theologian, writer, Christian Socialist
    # Augustus De Morgan 1806-1871 Mathematician; symbolic logic
    # Richard Chenevix Trench 1807-1888 Poet, Archbishop of Dublin; Theorist of English Language
    # James Spedding 1808-1881 Scholar; editor of Bacon's Works
    # Monckton Milnes 1809-1885 Politician, man of letters
    # Alfred Tennyson 1809-1892 Poet - Maud, In Memoriam
    # Edward Fitzgerald 1809-1883 Poet - `The Rubá iyá t of Omar Khayyá m'
    # William M. Thackeray 1811-1863 Novelist - Vanity Fair, Henry Esmond
    # Tom Taylor 1817-1880 Scottish dramatist; editor of Punch
    # Thomas Wade 1818-1895 Diplomat; invented Wade-Giles Chinese transliteration
    # John James Robert Manners, 7th Duke of Rutland known as Lord John Manners 1818-1906 Conservative statesman
    # Arthur Cayley 1821-1895 Mathematician; non-Euclidean geometry, invented matrices
    # Francis Galton 1822-1911 Scientist; meteorology, heredity
    # Brooke Westcott 1825-1901 Canon of Westminster, Bishop of Durham
    # Edward Henry Stanley, 15th Earl of Derby 1826-1893 Foreign Secretary
    # William Waddington 1826-1894 French Prime Minister 1879; archaeologist
    # William Harcourt 1827-1904 Liberal statesman; home secretary, Chancellor of the Exchequer
    # Hugh Childers 1827-1896 Australian statesman, then British Chancellor of the Exchequer
    # Joseph Barber Lightfoot 1828-1889 Bishop of Durham; theologian
    # Edward White Benson 1829-1896 Archbishop of Canterbury, 1883-1896
    # James Clerk Maxwell 1831-1879 Physicist; electromagnetism
    # Spencer Compton Cavendish, 8th Duke of Devonshire known as Marquess of Hartington 1833-1908; politician
    # John Emerich Edward Dalberg Acton, 1st Baron Acton 1834-1902 Historian
    # Henry Campbell-Bannerman 1836-1908 Prime Minister 1905-1908 (Liberal)
    # Michael Foster 1836-1907 Physiologist; MP (London University)
    # Henry Sidgwick 1838-1900 Philosopher, major proponent of women's colleges
    # George Otto Trevelyan 1838-1928 Historian; MP; Father of G. M. Trevelyan
    # Richard Jebb 1841-1905 Greek scholar
    # King Edward VII 1841-1910 Reigned 1901-1910
    # Frederick Pollock 1845-1937 Jurist
    # Edmund Gosse 1845-1928 Poet, critic - On Viol and Flute
    # Arthur James Balfour 1848-1930 Prime Minister 1902-1905 (Conservative)
    # Frederick W. Maitland 1850-1906 Legal historian
    # Albert Henry George Grey, 4th Earl Grey 1851-1917 Governor-General of Canada 1904-1911
    # Charles Stanford 1852-1924 Composer, organist
    # James Frazer 1854-1941 Anthropologist; writer - The Golden Bough
    # A. E. Housman 1859-1936 Poet - A Shropshire Lad; Classical scholar
    # A. N. Whitehead 1861-1947 Philosopher, mathematician
    # George, Lord Carnarvon 1866-1923 Egyptologist; funded the discovery of Tut'ankhamun's tomb
    # Freeman Freeman-Thomas, Marquis of Willingdon 1866-1941 Administrator; Viceroy of India
    # Stanley Baldwin 1867-1947 Prime Minister 1923-24, 1924-29, 1935-37 (Conservative)
    # Erskine Childers 1870-1922 Writer, Irish Nationalist - The Riddle of The Sands
    # Ralph Vaughan Williams 1872-1958 Composer - Sea Symphony, Pilgrim's Progress
    # Prince Ranjitsinhji 1872-1933 Cricketer; Indian Prince
    # G. E. Moore 1873-1958 Philosopher
    # Aleister Crowley 1875-1947 Writer and 'Magician'; 'the wickedest man alive'
    # Mohammed Iqbal 1875-1938 Islamic poet and philosopher
    # Charles Rolls 1877-1910 Co-founder of Rolls-Royce; aviator
    # James Jeans 1877-1946 Astronomer, mathematician; stellar evolution
    # Godfrey Harold Hardy 1877-1947 Mathematician; A Mathematician's Apology
    # Lytton Strachey 1880-1932 Biographer - Eminent Victorians; Bloomsbury Group
    # Leonard Woolf 1880-1969 Writer; husband of Virginia; Bloomsbury Group
    # Clive Bell 1881-1964 Art and literary critic; husband of Vanessa
    # Alfred Radcliffe-Brown 1881-1955 Social anthropologist
    # A. A. Milne 1882-1956 Novelist - Winnie the Pooh
    # Arthur Eddington 1882-1944 Astronomer
    # John Edensor Littlewood 1885-1977 Mathematician; Fourier Series, Zeta Function
    # Harry Philby 1885-1960 Explorer of Arabia; father of Kim
    # G. I. Taylor 1886-1975 Physicist, mathematician; Fluid dynamics, crystals
    # C. D. Broad 1887-1971 Philosopher
    # Srinivasa Ramanujan 1887-1920 Mathematician; analytic number theory, elliptic integrals
    # Sydney Chapman 1888-1970 Mathematician, geophysicist; kinetic theory, geomagnetism
    # Ludwig Wittgenstein 1889-1951 Philosopher
    # Jawaharlal Nehru 1889-1964 First Prime Minister of India, 1949-1964
    # George VI of the United Kingdom 1895-1952 Reigned 1936-1952
    # Vladimir Nabokov 1899-1977 Russian and English novelist - Lolita
    # Christopher, Lord Hinton 1901-1983 Nuclear engineer; constructed Calder Hall, the first large scale reactor
    # George 'Gubby' Allen 1902-1989 Cricketer - captained England; played in Bodyline series
    # Frank Plumpton Ramsey 1903-1930 Philosopher, mathematician, economist
    # Otto Frisch 1904-1979 Nuclear physicist; first used the term 'nuclear fission'
    # Erskine Childers 1905-1974 President of the Irish Republic, 1973-74
    # John Lehmann 1907-1987 Poet, man of letters; inaugurated The London Magazine
    # Anthony Blunt 1907-1983 Soviet spy; art historian
    # Peter Scott 1909-1989 Artist, ornithologist; Olympic sailor (1936)
    # Nicholas Monsarrat 1910-1979 Novelist - The Cruel Sea
    # Guy Burgess 1910-1963 Soviet spy and traitor
    # Kim Philby 1911-1988 Double agent; communist
    # Enoch Powell 1912-1998 Statesman; Minister of Health, 1960-3
    # William Whitelaw 1918-1999 Statesman; Home Secretary, 1979-83
    # John Robinson 1919-1983 Theologian; Bishop of Woolwich, Dean of Trinity
    # Alexander Ramsay of Mar 1919-2001 great grandson of Queen Victoria
    # Raymond Williams 1921-1988 Marxist critic, novelist - The Country and the City
    # Rajiv Gandhi 1944-1989 Prime Minister of India, 1984-1989
    # Charles, Prince of Wales born 1948
    # Antony Gormley born 1950 Sculptor, best known for Angel of the North 1968-71
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    Best Cambridge college??? Newnham all the way...


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    JaF, of course Trinity have got a long list of people who've been there, it's one of the biggest! (The biggest?)

    I say Peterhouse - small, beautiful, friendly, great atmosphere.
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    (Original post by JaF)
    Trinity is the best college, look at this list of people who have attended Trinity:

    #blah blah blah
    Hmm, yeah, I get that from my best friend all the time. Thing is, they might all be famous but they're pretty poorly developed personalities! (Prince Charles, Byron...)

    Sidney has to have the best location in Cambridge And apparently we throw one of the best May Balls in the university - looking forward to the summer so i can test that one...
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    (Original post by Alaric)
    So, umm, yes, Clare is the best.
    Yep, I'm with that one! It's gorgeous, it's good academically, the standard of music there is fantastic (the choir may not have the prestige of King's but it's still pretty damn amazing!) and everyone is hugely friendly. It's also not absolutely enormous like Trinity, John's etc, so you don't feel totally lost, but it's bigger than e.g. Peterhouse, so you don't know every single person's business (and they don't know yours). Oh, and Clare's May Ball is meant to be pretty amazing too, MadNatSci

    All the Cambridge colleges can produce fairly impressive lists of alumni - Trinity's is the longest because it's the biggest and richest, so more people have gone through it. But I wouldn't have been happy there, I'd have just got lost in some corner and never come out.

    King's is pretty (but not that pretty, if you ask me - the buildings are all kinda dirty), but full of tourists.

    I'm not going to comment on all the colleges, cos I don't know enough about them, but yeah, Clare rules.
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    (Original post by Helenia)
    Yep, I'm with that one! It's gorgeous, it's good academically, the standard of music there is fantastic (the choir may not have the prestige of King's but it's still pretty damn amazing!) and everyone is hugely friendly. It's also not absolutely enormous like Trinity, John's etc, so you don't feel totally lost, but it's bigger than e.g. Peterhouse, so you don't know every single person's business (and they don't know yours). Oh, and Clare's May Ball is meant to be pretty amazing too, MadNatSci
    I'll admit that Clare has an edge... The choir is too good though, if I'd gone there I'd never have been able to sing and I couldn't be havin' with that!

    All the Cambridge colleges can produce fairly impressive lists of alumni - Trinity's is the longest because it's the biggest and richest, so more people have gone through it.
    The closest poor old Sidney has got to a famous alumnus (excluding Carol Vorderman!!) is 'the bloke who lectured Pitt the Younger'. Ah dear...
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    (Original post by MadNatSci)
    I'll admit that Clare has an edge... The choir is too good though, if I'd gone there I'd never have been able to sing and I couldn't be havin' with that!
    Yeah, I'm suffering from that - they haven't taken any Fresher volunteers into the choir, and that was one of the reasons I applied there; I didn't realise quite how good the choir was! You sing at Sidney then?

    I have to say, you do have a building called Mong Hall though, which still makes me laugh when I walk past the sign to it every week!
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    (Original post by Helenia)
    Yeah, I'm suffering from that - they haven't taken any Fresher volunteers into the choir, and that was one of the reasons I applied there; I didn't realise quite how good the choir was! You sing at Sidney then?
    Yes, I do - but the drawback to having a voluntary choir is that it isn't *quite* as good as the ones who take all choral scholars (ahem). However, do Clare have hedgehog mascots?! I thought not

    Seriously, I went to hear Clare choir sing at the Proms this year and I'm not convinced they're not better than Trinity..!

    I have to say, you do have a building called Mong Hall though, which still makes me laugh when I walk past the sign to it every week!
    Ah yes, the ever lovely Mong Hall... which looks pretty much as it sounds
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    (Original post by MadNatSci)
    Yes, I do - but the drawback to having a voluntary choir is that it isn't *quite* as good as the ones who take all choral scholars (ahem). However, do Clare have hedgehog mascots?! I thought not

    Seriously, I went to hear Clare choir sing at the Proms this year and I'm not convinced they're not better than Trinity..!
    Does that mean you think they are better than Trinity, or not? I think they like to think they are :rolleyes: I wish I could have seen them at the proms, but I didn't know they were on at the time. However, I have heard them on many occasions since then, and they're like nothing I ever heard before.

    And no, we don't have a hedgehog mascot, although one of my friends who is in the choir does look rather hedgehog like, and isn't much bigger than one!
 
 
 
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