P1 maths - discriminant/top-up fees

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meepmeep
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#21
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#21
Anybody already in higher education when the fees are introduced do not have to pay top up fees. They will pay at the same rate (not taking into account inflation) as those at university do now.
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GH
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#22
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(Original post by meepmeep)
Anybody already in higher education when the fees are introduced do not have to pay top up fees. They will pay at the same rate (not taking into account inflation) as those at university do now.
thats good....very good
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way2go
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#23
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(Original post by meepmeep)
Anybody already in higher education when the fees are introduced do not have to pay top up fees. They will pay at the same rate (not taking into account inflation) as those at university do now.
From 2006 on, will it still be possible to get full financial funding if your parents earn less than let's say 22000 pounds a year, i.e. you don't have to pay full fees of 3000 at all?

(Not the right thread to discuss this I guess, but anyway hey)
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meepmeep
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#24
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Sorry, it's off topic, but this is the last post I'll make on it, promise!

(Original post by way2go)
From 2006 on, will it still be possible to get full financial funding if your parents earn less than let's say 22000 pounds a year, i.e. you don't have to pay full fees of 3000 at all?

(Not the right thread to discuss this I guess, but anyway hey)
From this site it would appear that students will only get the first £1100 paid for (with another £1000 grant available per year) out of the £3000, so it would appear that no-one will have all their fees paid for them.
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Harry Potter
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#25
Does it matter how much your parents earn if you want to get a student loan?
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meepmeep
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#26
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(Original post by Harry Potter)
Does it matter how much your parents earn if you want to get a student loan?
For next year, yes. From UCAS:
The maximum loans available in 2003/04 are £4,930 for students living away from home and studying in London; £4,000 for students living away from home and studying outside London and £3,165 for students living at home.

75% of the maximum loan is available to all eligible students regardless of any other income they have. Whether you can get any or all of the remaining 25% depends on your income and that of your family. As a general guide, if you do not pay fees, you will be able to get the maximum loan.

Also, the fees are means tested.
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GH
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#27
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(Original post by meepmeep)
For next year, yes. From UCAS:
The maximum loans available in 2003/04 are £4,930 for students living away from home and studying in London; £4,000 for students living away from home and studying outside London and £3,165 for students living at home.

75% of the maximum loan is available to all eligible students regardless of any other income they have. Whether you can get any or all of the remaining 25% depends on your income and that of your family. As a general guide, if you do not pay fees, you will be able to get the maximum loan.

Also, the fees are means tested.
Whats the interest rate?
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meepmeep
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#28
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(Original post by 2776)
Whats the interest rate?
Tied in with the rate of inflation (it's not a commercial loan, so it is cheaper than bank loans). Was 3.1% in September apparently.
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GH
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#29
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(Original post by meepmeep)
Tied in with the rate of inflation (it's not a commercial loan, so it is cheaper than bank loans). Was 3.1% in September apparently.
Good, so if I put teh loan into a high interest long term bank account...tehn I would get a profit?
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meepmeep
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#30
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(Original post by 2776)
Good, so if I put teh loan into a high interest long term bank account...tehn I would get a profit?
Yes. If you can afford to pay the fees outright, then you can invest the money and make a healthy profit on it.
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GH
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#31
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(Original post by meepmeep)
Yes. If you can afford to pay the fees outright, then you can invest the money and make a healthy profit on it.
Or you can work during teh UNI days, like part time work
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meepmeep
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#32
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(Original post by 2776)
Or you can work during teh UNI days, like part time work
Yep, that as well, although you have to pay fees up front (and the payment isn't a lump sum).
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