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    (Original post by martynwilliams)
    How do you manage six 9am lectures in a 5 day week? Do they lecture on Saturdays??
    Yes, I had two lectures but I believe some people had four (I think they took Maths, Chem, Compsci and a biological subject). It's alright, because Friday isn't a clubbing night. You get used to it.
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    (Original post by Lauren)
    Yes, I had two lectures but I believe some people had four (I think they took Maths, Chem, Compsci and a biological subject). It's alright, because Friday isn't a clubbing night. You get used to it.
    That’s harsh!
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    So, on average, how many hours a day are you in a lecture/tutorial etc?
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    that's not early... when I went to school before I changed I got up every morning at 6.30am...
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    (Original post by kitsune)
    that's not early... when I went to school before I changed I got up every morning at 6.30am...
    That's still the middle of the night! :eek:
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    Last year I think I went to around 60% of lectures.... Maybe less actually. I used the holidays to catch up with all my work!
    I found it soooo hard to focus in lectures though I prefer to learn it on my own.
    Worked out ok
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    (Original post by spangletastic)
    That's still the middle of the night! :eek:
    Canary Islands is different than UK! I think it was dawn at that time...
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    Registers are taken my my uni and you won't be entered for the exams if you miss too many-I attended all in my first semester and missed loads in my second due to personal problems and my grades collapsed. Personal experience would indicate you can miss some but you have to be careful about which and to make sure you keep on top of things. Common sense really.
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    (Original post by martynwilliams)
    No, the lecturers only lecture a lecture once, we don’t have repeats (in the Politics department anyway) neither do we have reading weeks!

    I’m not too sure how the third year works though. The classes are going to be quite small in number, as they cap 3rd year modules, so they may be taught in seminar style classes rather than lectures.

    Some lecturers (and one in particular) give notes (one of them gives pages and pages of notes) others don’t. The thinking behind that is a) if they give out notes, people wont bother turning up to lectures and b) they’ll spend the lecture reading the notes rather than listening to them!
    Ah, the lecturers here only lecture once. But what I meant was sometimes students pick their classes because of their lecture times. (So we pick the classes; but the school sets the times ahead of time so we can see them to judge whether or not we want to take that class.)

    None of the lecturers hand out notes here; they probably share the same mentality. (However for some economics courses, they do power point slides that you can download off the net, but the professor talks additionally to the power point.) My friend took mathematics notes in class with her notebook, and I photocopied it. Hhehe...well even if I had showed up my handwriting would be illegible.

    However, I would say that i'd prefer if professors don't give us handouts, unless of course they organize outlines for us. It demotivates us. Most of the time if they give us a handout, we'll say "we'll read it later" and then end up doing it before the midterm or the final at the end of the semester.
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    (Original post by SlyPie)
    Ah, the lecturers here only lecture once. But what I meant was sometimes students pick their classes because of their lecture times. (So we pick the classes; but the school sets the times ahead of time so we can see them to judge whether or not we want to take that class.)

    None of the lecturers hand out notes here; they probably share the same mentality. (However for some economics courses, they do power point slides that you can download off the net, but the professor talks additionally to the power point.) My friend took mathematics notes in class with her notebook, and I photocopied it. Hhehe...well even if I had showed up my handwriting would be illegible.

    However, I would say that i'd prefer if professors don't give us handouts, unless of course they organize outlines for us. It demotivates us. Most of the time if they give us a handout, we'll say "we'll read it later" and then end up doing it before the midterm or the final at the end of the semester.
    Oh, yes, we can pick which classes we want to take, there are some compulsory classes (which, as it happens, both weekly lectures were given at 9am) and elective classes where you choose which ones you want to take.

    At my University, you need to “pick up” 120 credits per year, most classes are worth 20 credits each (some 10 credits) so in my case, I’d pick six classes out of a choice of 11 or 12.

    I think it’s much better if the lecturers just give outline notes, with the important facts on. If they give you a full set of notes, then you’re less likely to read it. At least when you write notes in lectures, you tend to remember (vaguely) what you’ve written!
 
 
 
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