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    (Original post by aminxv)
    Thanks!!!!!!
    You are welcome. Have taken a closer look on your page in the meantime. If I have enough time next time, I would read your article 'Pauli's Exclusion principle - Basic Proof'. If this page goes on in that way, it would be a gold mine for physics lovers like me.
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    (Original post by Kallisto)
    You are welcome. Have taken a closer look on your page in the meantime. If I have enough time next time, I would read your article 'Pauli's Exclusion principle - Basic Proof'. If this page goes on in that way, it would be a gold mine for physics lovers like me.
    Thanks man! Hope you enjoy the article!
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    (Original post by aminxv)
    Thanks man! Hope you enjoy the article!
    So, after a very, very long while, I have had time to read the article about Pauli's exclusion principle at last. Very understandable and a good start in a deeper understanding of quantum physics. Rspect for this writing!

    Fermions contains the typical charged particles, so electrons and protons and the non-charged neutrons. Plus the sub particles neutrinos and the quarks. I wonder is the wavefunciton intended for determining the state of an electron in a quantum state in particular? can Pauli's exclusion principle combined with Heisenberg's uncertainty relation by any chance?

    Say we are using the wavefunction of Pauli's principle to show up the electrons have not the same state. Say, Heisenberg's uncertainty relation is used to determine the waves of the electrons as precise as possible (to get a lesser precision of the location of course). In my view, we can combined them a.) to show that the electrons are really in a different state, and b.) to get the different states of the electrons out. From this point of view, is Pauli's principle an unneccesary step, as it is known that different states are in existence or is it neccesary, as it is not so well known in a great extention as we supposed to?
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    Can I join pls


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    (Original post by Kyx)
    Can I join pls


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    Of course, you can. Why are you hesitating? don't know how to join?

    Before you do, tell something about your interest in Physics, please.
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    (Original post by Kallisto)
    Of course, you can. Why are you hesitating? don't know how to join?

    Before you do, tell something about your interest in Physics, please.
    I'll start from the beginning

    I was never interested in physics until year 6. Before that it was all about biology. But I had an amazing teacher in year 6, and we learnt all about the solar system and it's nine planets (this was in 2008-2009, even though Pluto was demoted in 2006).

    Since then my interest in Physics has only grown. Before my GCSE exams, I started reading about A-level physics. During A-level physics, if any of the other students missed the lesson, the teacher would get me to teach them.

    Ever since year 9 I have wanted to study physics at university, and I will finally start in September

    My aim is to get a PhD in astronomy.




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    So nice to see that your aims based on a good teacher who awakes your interest in this science. Had experienced the other thing of it, that is to say I had a very bad teacher in physics in teaching the lessons. He has almost ruined my interest for that! thanks to my self studies and my autodidact manner for learning things, I was capable of getting interest in by my own.

    My personal favorite for study is something mixed with another sciecne, biophysics for instance.
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    (Original post by Kallisto)
    So nice to see that your aims based on a good teacher who awakes your interest in this science. Had experienced the other thing of it, that is to say I had a very bad teacher in physics in teaching the lessons. He has almost ruined my interest for that! thanks to my self studies and my autodidact manner for learning things, I was capable of getting interest in by my own.

    My personal favorite for study is something mixed with another sciecne, biophysics for instance.
    You gotta love quantum biology


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    (Original post by Kyx)
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    Good luck with starting your degree! I strongly urge you to recap your maths before you start, it is much more the language of physics at degree level than it is at A Level.
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    (Original post by Cerdic)
    Good luck with starting your degree! I strongly urge you to recap your maths before you start, it is much more the language of physics at degree level than it is at A Level.
    Definitely, lol

    I'm working on it, recapping calculus and statistics right now


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    (Original post by Kyx)
    Definitely, lol

    I'm working on it, recapping calculus and statistics right now

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    If I were you I'd concentrate more on mechanics than statistics, although any practice is good practice
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    (Original post by Cerdic)
    If I were you I'd concentrate more on mechanics than statistics, although any practice is good practice
    Okay

    What main topics shall I recap? Trigonometry and quadratic equations are good
    What else?


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    (Original post by Kyx)
    Okay

    What main topics shall I recap? Trigonometry and quadratic equations are good
    What else?


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    Differential equations would be top of my list. Not too hard, just the kind at A Level. Beyond the standard stuff you've done, have a gander at complex numbers
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    (Original post by Cerdic)
    Differential equations would be top of my list. Not too hard, just the kind at A Level. Beyond the standard stuff you've done, have a gander at complex numbers
    Yass, I love complex numbers

    Thx


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    (Original post by Kyx)
    You gotta love quantum biology


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    So it is the whole life seen in particles and subatomic particles? Is it really that what it wants to be?
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    (Original post by Kallisto)
    So it is the whole life seen in particles and subatomic particles? Is it really that what it wants to be?
    Basically, biology had some things it couldn't explain, and quantum physicists realised they could explain it with quantum physics. The biologists said they didn't want quantum physics messing around with their biology, but when they saw how easily it could solve their problems they had for decades, they agreed that quantum physics can stay

    The main things I know about quantum biology:

    - animals that use the Earth's magnetic field to know where they are have detectors in their eyes that use quantum entanglement.
    - Random genetic mutations are caused by quantum tunnelling
    - plants photosynthesise using wave-particle duality
    - tadpoles turn into frogs using quantum tunnelling
    - the nose does not detect the shape of molecules, but the vibration of the bonds between the atoms in the molecules. This is called the quantum theory if olfaction.



    I watched a documentary on it a few years ago by Jim Al-Khalili

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    (Original post by Kyx)
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    Can you name the documentary with Jim-Al Khalili in it please? I want to get to know this quantum biology stuff too. Oh and I adore Khalili as both moderator of scientific TV shows and as a scientist. He is very good in telling people interesting aspects of sciences with passion.
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    (Original post by Kallisto)
    Can you name the documentary with Jim-Al Khalili in it please? I want to get to know this quantum biology stuff too. Oh and I adore Khalili as both moderator of scientific TV shows and as a scientist. He is very good in telling people interesting aspects of sciences with passion.
    Yes I'm watching his electricity ones on BBC 4

    And I think it was called the physics of life or something


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    (Original post by Kallisto)
    Can you name the documentary with Jim-Al Khalili in it please? I want to get to know this quantum biology stuff too. Oh and I adore Khalili as both moderator of scientific TV shows and as a scientist. He is very good in telling people interesting aspects of sciences with passion.
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b04v85cj
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    Yeah, that is! thank you so much for posting the link! will watch it by occasion. documentaries with Al-Khalili are so instructive!
 
 
 
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