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theECONOMIST
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#81
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#81
(Original post by the g)
he must be an oxbridge derivatives realestate trader who dabbles in investments. thats the only way he could afford such things. and he must have never set foot in another university and must take drugs during the course of a 150hour work week.

Look i didn't say you need to go to oxbridge to work at a top investment bank, i said it REALLY helps. Look firms like goldman sachs do presentations at oxbridge and lse (and a FEW other places).
A few years ago Morgan Stanley Dean Witter recruited half, yes half of its total grduate intake from oxbridge, then you can imagine many were from lse and continental europe i.e.bocconi in italy.
Derivatives traders (or equity traders even) make loads IF THEY'RE GOOD.
When their market is the hot market then top performers will earn 7 figure salaries (you can quote me on this).
have you not been using my links?
Maybe you go to a low class university and can't accept that you're chances in investment banking are non-existent.
Try operations (back office work), they'll recruit you from there. Its well paid but not nearly as well as front office.

Dammit go to the goldman website, or jpmorgan or even citygroup, you'll see that im right.
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matouwah
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#82
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#82
(Original post by theECONOMIST)
Look i didn't say you need to go to oxbridge to work at a top investment bank, i said it REALLY helps. Look firms like goldman sachs do presentations at oxbridge and lse (and a FEW other places).
A few years ago Morgan Stanley Dean Witter recruited half, yes half of its total grduate intake from oxbridge, then you can imagine many were from lse and continental europe i.e.bocconi in italy.
Derivatives traders (or equity traders even) make loads IF THEY'RE GOOD.
When their market is the hot market then top performers will earn 7 figure salaries (you can quote me on this).
have you not been using my links?
Maybe you go to a low class university and can't accept that you're chances in investment banking are non-existent.
Try operations (back office work), they'll recruit you from there. Its well paid but not nearly as well as front office.

Dammit go to the goldman website, or jpmorgan or even citygroup, you'll see that im right.
do u reckon UCL or warwick would be seen as inferior when compared to oxbridge and LSE?
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Leeroy
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#83
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#83
(Original post by matouwah)
do u reckon UCL or warwick would be seen as inferior when compared to oxbridge and LSE?
maybe a bit. when i did work experience in the IB dept. at HSBC they said that they tend to split the universities into tiers, so aslong as your in one of the top few you should be ok. Warwick are reknowned for strong links with industry, and UCL as one of the top london unis will always have a good reputation. But i still think that an oxbridge / lse degree will give you a slight edge in the financial sector.
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matouwah
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#84
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(Original post by Leeroy)
maybe a bit. when i did work experience in the IB dept. at HSBC they said that they tend to split the universities into tiers, so aslong as your in one of the top few you should be ok. Warwick are reknowned for strong links with industry, and UCL as one of the top london unis will always have a good reputation. But i still think that an oxbridge / lse degree will give you a slight edge in the financial sector.
just wondering as the times rates UCL as first for eco.......camrbdige is 2nd and LSE is 3rd...i think oxford is like 14th....
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Eggy Hog
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#85
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#85
(Original post by matouwah)
just wondering as the times rates UCL as first for eco.......camrbdige is 2nd and LSE is 3rd...i think oxford is like 14th....
possibly. From my experience, however, most employers couldn't care less for university rankings. They have a set ranking for unis with Oxbridge/LSE at the top - even if league tables say differently!
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Leeroy
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#86
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#86
(Original post by matouwah)
just wondering as the times rates UCL as first for eco.......camrbdige is 2nd and LSE is 3rd...i think oxford is like 14th....
moral of that story is dont always trust league tables. im sure most people would much rather do economics at oxford than any of no.4-no.12, and many people more so than ucl , cambrdige and lse
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matouwah
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#87
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(Original post by Eggy Hog)
possibly. From my experience, however, most employers couldn't care less for university rankings. They have a set ranking for unis with Oxbridge/LSE at the top - even if league tables say differently!
what bout employers in the US.....do they recognise universities such as UCL and warwick......or do they prefer US universities such as UPEN, michigan....NYU...etc?
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matouwah
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#88
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#88
(Original post by Leeroy)
moral of that story is dont always trust league tables. im sure most people would much rather do economics at oxford than any of no.4-no.12, and many people more so than ucl , cambrdige and lse
lol....i am only writing this **** coz i got rejected at oxford and lse....
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Eggy Hog
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#89
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#89
(Original post by matouwah)
what bout employers in the US.....do they recognise universities such as UCL and warwick......or do they prefer US universities such as UPEN, michigan....NYU...etc?
Although, UCL and Warwick are undoubtedly good universities, few americans have heard of them. They have heard on the other hand of Oxbridge and the LSE cos a lot of americans go there.
Basically, if you want to work in the US either go to Oxbridge or the LSE, or go to an american college.
Famous European schools like INSEAD (postgrad methinks) are also well regarded in the US
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matouwah
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#90
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#90
(Original post by Eggy Hog)
Although, UCL and Warwick are undoubtedly good universities, few americans have heard of them. They have heard on the other hand of Oxbridge and the LSE cos a lot of americans go there.
Basically, if you want to work in the US either go to Oxbridge or the LSE, or go to an american college.
Famous European schools like INSEAD (postgrad methinks) are also well regarded in the US
seeing that i dont have oxbridge or lse as i got rejected for both....i will go US now unless i get rejected at all.....warwick is probably as famous as richmond to most americans
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Saxman
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#91
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#91
Interesting post. Here are my thoughts.

Actuaries are well paid but unless they get some sort of management job or company directorship they are unlikely to break the 100K mark. Plus it is a rather boring job unless you are really into statistics and probability theory and the exams are meant to be a killer

Here is a joke I could not resist:
A woman went to see a doctor and he told her she only had five years to live, she was quite pertubed and asked if there was anything she could do about it, he said yes, marry an actuary. She said "Will this make me live longer" The doctor said "No but it will seem longer"

For those fancying investment banking, yes you can earn a lot but the big money is only after you have lasted three years, and they work new graduates extremely hard. It really is a case of your job is your life. Anyone who wants a social life or more than 5 hours sleep need not apply. Seriously you do need to consider the health implications. I did one summer internship with an investment bank and by the end of it I was a bag of nerves, overstressed, and with a sleep deficit it took a week to resolve (Incidentally I did spend that week on a beach in Hawaii with my earnings which rather cheered me up!)

Oh and if you want to do an investment banking I will say the obvious and state that you are well advised to do an internship beforehand: perform well enough and you get a job offer on graduation!

Stockbroking is a good option as it is a bit less demanding than investment banking and requires less brains. While the very best get paid astronomical amounts, even the mediocre get a comfortable living.

As for universities to go for: I would say Oxbridge, UCL and LSE are the top tier, followed closely by Warwick (where I am at-and they get loads of people into investment banking) and Bristol. Durham also has some luck, as does Nottingham and Bath. Universities other than that and your chances are slim indeed. As for Merrill Lynch and Goldman Sachs, I would agree with the Economist when I say LSE or Oxbridge, or else you had better be bloody intelligent, set for a first and superb at interviews.

For those wanting a nice tradeoff between a well paid job with lots of social life and not too much stress: go for the Civil Service (seriously they have some very interesting jobs), Law at a non-city firm, Bank of England, commercial banking. You can still live a comfortable lifestyle (eventually after about ten years you can get to 100K which is enough for anyone to live well on) and you get to enjoy your 20s and meet lots of people, pursue some interests outside of work etc.
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babylon
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#92
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#92
(Original post by Saxman)
As for universities to go for: I would say Oxbridge, UCL and LSE are the top tier, followed closely by Warwick (where I am at-and they get loads of people into investment banking) and Bristol. Durham also has some luck, as does Nottingham and Bath. Universities other than that and your chances are slim indeed. As for Merrill Lynch and Goldman Sachs, I would agree with the Economist when I say LSE or Oxbridge, or else you had better be bloody intelligent, set for a first and superb at interviews.

hey, so what r u doing at Warwick? and where did u have your intern?
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illumintai
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#93
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#93
(Original post by matouwah)
i am overseas student....in my school they beat u with bamboo sticks untill u can play an instruement to a high level....good thing my beatings didnt last more than a few years....
mate. you are not the only one.

I am from a country where

chewing a gum -> slap from teacher
laughing loud -> slap from teacher
late at lesson -> slap from teacher
being crap at exams -> broom stick on thigh (really hearts man! )

put it this way. slap was the kindest discipline I got.

Now I am in England's comprehensive school.

It was hard to get use to this "freedom" ha..
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theECONOMIST
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#94
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#94
(Original post by Saxman)
Interesting post. Here are my thoughts.

Actuaries are well paid but unless they get some sort of management job or company directorship they are unlikely to break the 100K mark. Plus it is a rather boring job unless you are really into statistics and probability theory and the exams are meant to be a killer

Here is a joke I could not resist:
A woman went to see a doctor and he told her she only had five years to live, she was quite pertubed and asked if there was anything she could do about it, he said yes, marry an actuary. She said "Will this make me live longer" The doctor said "No but it will seem longer"

For those fancying investment banking, yes you can earn a lot but the big money is only after you have lasted three years, and they work new graduates extremely hard. It really is a case of your job is your life. Anyone who wants a social life or more than 5 hours sleep need not apply. Seriously you do need to consider the health implications. I did one summer internship with an investment bank and by the end of it I was a bag of nerves, overstressed, and with a sleep deficit it took a week to resolve (Incidentally I did spend that week on a beach in Hawaii with my earnings which rather cheered me up!)

Oh and if you want to do an investment banking I will say the obvious and state that you are well advised to do an internship beforehand: perform well enough and you get a job offer on graduation!

Stockbroking is a good option as it is a bit less demanding than investment banking and requires less brains. While the very best get paid astronomical amounts, even the mediocre get a comfortable living.

As for universities to go for: I would say Oxbridge, UCL and LSE are the top tier, followed closely by Warwick (where I am at-and they get loads of people into investment banking) and Bristol. Durham also has some luck, as does Nottingham and Bath. Universities other than that and your chances are slim indeed. As for Merrill Lynch and Goldman Sachs, I would agree with the Economist when I say LSE or Oxbridge, or else you had better be bloody intelligent, set for a first and superb at interviews.

For those wanting a nice tradeoff between a well paid job with lots of social life and not too much stress: go for the Civil Service (seriously they have some very interesting jobs), Law at a non-city firm, Bank of England, commercial banking. You can still live a comfortable lifestyle (eventually after about ten years you can get to 100K which is enough for anyone to live well on) and you get to enjoy your 20s and meet lots of people, pursue some interests outside of work etc.

Thank you for clearing that up for them. My mother once lectured at nottingham so I feel ibliged to jump to their defence when you made it sound as if their graduates were inferior to that of warwick and bristol. In my opinion oxbridge lse ucl and imperial (a maths degree from there will work wonders) are surely top. But hey a first from the likes of notts warick and bristol will work almost just as well.
I advised these guys, who have a knack for numbers like i do to go for trading. 60hr work weeks and a salary that may exceed that of a bankers.

Oh yes, for those of you looking to become tomorrow's CEO's look into management consulting as the learning curve is incredibly steep and you gain great skills. what do management consultants do here's your answer check thi site http://www.vault.com/. It is probably the only career in the city that offers salaries to new graduate at the same level as investment banks. It involves a lot of travel and the hours can range from 60hrs to 80+ when something big is going down.
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theECONOMIST
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#95
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#95
(Original post by wonkey)
hey, so what r u doing at Warwick? and where did u have your intern?

In your penultimate year at university you apply for a summer internship, i think closing dates are around january, correct me if i'm wrong.

Its usually 10 weeks and if you go to one of the afformentioned universities apply to banks like citygroup investment bank, barclays capital, jp morganchase, goldmansachs, msdw, deutche bank, csfb and UBS warburgh.

I was once at heathrow at arrivals awaiting my fathers arrival from a prolonged business trip and i noticed all the cheuffers and limo drivers holding up cards with people names on it and at the bottom was the name of the bank that person represented. Then came this VERY HOT woman who got off the paris to london and was very smartly dressed. The limo guy (holding a ubs warburgh) card grabbed her things and off they went. Then i thought what a life. But my father prefers to meet us when he arrives rather than some driver who doesn't even care if he makes it back safely.
Oh well.
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matouwah
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#96
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(Original post by theECONOMIST)
In your penultimate year at university you apply for a summer internship, i think closing dates are around january, correct me if i'm wrong.

Its usually 10 weeks and if you go to one of the afformentioned universities apply to banks like citygroup investment bank, barclays capital, jp morganchase, goldmansachs, msdw, deutche bank, csfb and UBS warburgh.

I was once at heathrow at arrivals awaiting my fathers arrival from a prolonged business trip and i noticed all the cheuffers and limo drivers holding up cards with people names on it and at the bottom was the name of the bank that person represented. Then came this VERY HOT woman who got off the paris to london and was very smartly dressed. The limo guy (holding a ubs warburgh) card grabbed her things and off they went. Then i thought what a life. But my father prefers to meet us when he arrives rather than some driver who doesn't even care if he makes it back safely.
Oh well.
so going to UCL to study eco won't hinder my chances of getting internships and jobs when i graduate? would a 2.1 from LSE be valued the same as a 1st from UCL, by employers such as Goldman Sachs, Morgan Stanley, etc?
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Harry Potter
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#97
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#97
(Original post by Saxman)
Interesting post. Here are my thoughts.

Actuaries are well paid but unless they get some sort of management job or company directorship they are unlikely to break the 100K mark. Plus it is a rather boring job unless you are really into statistics and probability theory and the exams are meant to be a killer

Here is a joke I could not resist:
A woman went to see a doctor and he told her she only had five years to live, she was quite pertubed and asked if there was anything she could do about it, he said yes, marry an actuary. She said "Will this make me live longer" The doctor said "No but it will seem longer"
I think you're right there. I was told "actuaries are people who tried acountancy and found it too exciting." On the other hand, the hours are probably a lot better than some of the other, higher paid jobs you mentioned and in the latter part of your career you can probably spend the majority of your time meeting clients rather than doing the number crunching side of it.
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Saxman
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#98
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#98
Yes I am at Warwick studying Economics, and I did an internship last summer at Citigroup.

UCL will not hinder your chances of getting a job. In fact if you attend one of the aforementioned top universities your chancs won't be hindered. I am just saying that Oxbridge does give you an advantage.
But a 1st from a top university would outweigh a 2.1 at LSE and Oxbridge in my opinion. Recruiters know that Oxbridge is a bit of a lottery and just because someone got into Oxbridge doesn't mean they are automatically going to perform a lot better on the job than a UCL or Bristol candidate. They look at a lot of things: your A level grades, your university degree, your interview performance, your application form, your extra curricular work, your people skills, etc. etc. They don't just say, lets just employ Cambridge's 3rd year economics graduates.

Management consultancy is another way to earn a lot, although it does involve very long hours and living out of a suitcase most of the year.
Go for firms like Bain and Co, Ernst and Young, Accenture (although more technology), and McKinsey. Not sure it is the passport towards becoming a CEO. Most of them either become independents or take presidential positions within the consultancy firm.

ECOnomist, you seem pretty knowlegeable for an 18 year old. Glad to see you are thinking ahead. Trading is probably the best of the investment bank jobs, although it could become rather repetitive. However it is meant to give a real high when you make a lot of money!

Harry Potter you are spot on about actuaries. If you can survive the first 5 boring years and pass the exams, you can go into consulting whi9ch is more fun.
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lyd
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#99
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saxman is talking sense.

Credit I-bank recruiters with a bit of sense- they dont just recruit from Oxbridge or LSE. I have 2 friends from Imperial with solid 2:1s working at Goldman. My bro got a decidedly average 2:1 from UCL, but he's very entrepreneurial and is very quant, so he got into the UBS grad program. As long as you get a solid 2:1 from any of the other good unis (Bristol, Notts, UCL, Warwick, Durham, Bham) and you write good answers on your application form, you will be able to get interviews. From then on, it will be down to how well you interview.

If you go to a less reputable uni, you will probably need a 1st to get to the interview stage, but the door is not automatically shut just because you didnt go to one of the big unis.
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AlexDowning
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#100
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#100
Most econ, finance and such jobs are very well paid, especially in London.. LSE has a very good reputation but I dont think you would have to go to such a high class uni to be well paid - just a good one and then work your protfolio from there.
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