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    I dubt many people are interested in such stories, so they do not receive much news coverage.
    Perhaps it does happen....

    To attribute America's good universities (although to claim, as many league tables do, that theu have 40 of the world's top 50 unis is farcical) to philanthropic immigrants is naive.

    Unless that post was ironic...
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    Somewhat anecdotal, surely? Or does this sort of thing happen a lot?
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    Is Bismark simply making the point that in America people see it as their duty to give something back to their university, a culture not prevalent in the UK?

    Because the alternative - that we should rely on wealthy immigrants - seems, uh, unlikely.
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    If I make a fortune, I plan to make it back to those who helped me along. I think it's the natural thing to do. If Brits don't as much, maybe it's because British education generally isn't particularly as good, or as inspiring, as American.
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    That's an amazing story.
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    I don't think American universities are that great. Most American graduates I know are as thick as two short planks.
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    (Original post by Tonight Matthew)
    Somewhat anecdotal, surely? Or does this sort of thing happen a lot?
    Of course it happens a lot. I went to a public (government-run) university, and half of the revenues came from alumni contributions. Harvard has a $20 billion trust thanks to alumni contributions. These kind of contributions allows American colleges to expand, hire the best professors in the world, and remain free from government inteference.

    (Original post by Phonicsdude)
    I dubt many people are interested in such stories, so they do not receive much news coverage.
    Perhaps it does happen....

    To attribute America's good universities (although to claim, as many league tables do, that theu have 40 of the world's top 50 unis is farcical) to philanthropic immigrants is naive.

    Unless that post was ironic...
    How else do you think the US manages to have state-of-the-art technology in its universities and attracts the best talent in the world (in terms of professors and students)? My college built a campus for $400 million (half of it from private contributors). Private firms and individuals fully paid for a large market trading room (it was used by some of the largest firms after 9/11 since their headquarters were destroyed), including chairs that cost $2,000 a piece. We also got about a thousand computers, most of it due to donations. And this all despite this being a public university.
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    I wish that sort of thing happened on a more frequent basis in other countries.
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    (Original post by Darth)
    I wish that sort of thing happened on a more frequent basis in other countries.
    It would if the governments of those countries allowed the students to think that the university is providing them with the education, and not the government. Since they already pay a fortune to the government in taxes, they have no reason to leave their money to it. Attachment to the actual universties is tiny, since their cost of education is paid by the government and the universties are heavily regulated by the government in just about every respect.
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    (Original post by Phonicsdude)
    To attribute America's good universities (although to claim, as many league tables do, that theu have 40 of the world's top 50 unis is farcical) to philanthropic immigrants is naive.
    Agree.

    I do applaud Dr. Vilcek, is a very nice thing what he has done.
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    (Original post by Bismarck)
    Of course it happens a lot. I went to a public (government-run) university, and half of the revenues came from alumni contributions. Harvard has a $20 billion trust thanks to alumni contributions. These kind of contributions allows American colleges to expand, hire the best professors in the world, and remain free from government inteference.



    How else do you think the US manages to have state-of-the-art technology in its universities and attracts the best talent in the world (in terms of professors and students)? My college built a campus for $400 million (half of it from private contributors). Private firms and individuals fully paid for a large market trading room (it was used by some of the largest firms after 9/11 since their headquarters were destroyed), including chairs that cost $2,000 a piece. We also got about a thousand computers, most of it due to donations. And this all despite this being a public university.
    American unis are far better at raising money.
    There seemed to be some stress on the fact the guy was an immigrant.. :confused:
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    (Original post by Howard)
    I don't think American universities are that great. Most American graduates I know are as thick as two short planks.
    Out of personal experience,:ditto:
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    I think the Alumni factor is important. To give an example, look at Christ Church in Oxford and Trinity College in Cambridge. Both of these institutions are considered very wealthy, and both have very good bursaries and allowances for students, all because of healthy donations from alumni. I heard from a friend that Christ Church gives students a book grant/allowance of almost 100 pounds. Perhaps if other Universities in Britain could copy the methods used here, they could manage to obtain more funding?
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    (Original post by Phonicsdude)
    American unis are far better at raising money.
    There seemed to be some stress on the fact the guy was an immigrant.. :confused:
    Would you prefer to go to a run-down uni with crappy professors or a state-of-the-art one with the top professors in the world?
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    (Original post by Bismarck)
    It would if the governments of those countries allowed the students to think that the university is providing them with the education, and not the government. Since they already pay a fortune to the government in taxes, they have no reason to leave their money to it. Attachment to the actual universties is tiny, since their cost of education is paid by the government and the universties are heavily regulated by the government in just about every respect.
    Are you suggsting UK studen ts would feel more attachment to their universities if they were paying ten times as much to attend rather than having costs covered by the government? Because y'know, if my degree had a similar price tag to the kind top American universities have, attached isn't quite the word I'd use to describe my feelings on the matter.
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    (Original post by Bismarck)
    Would you prefer to go to a run-down uni with crappy professors or a state-of-the-art one with the top professors in the world?
    I dont think I have suggested that Id prefer one to th oher in this thread thus far.
    But the latter would appeal tome more :p:

    Its GOOD that american unis are better financed!
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    Well... my contribution in the future will depend entirely on the quality of education I receive, and how much I enjoy being part of the university.

    Perhaps Americans have more fun at uni? Or perhaps they are just more generous?

    British people are far from tight though... just look at the cash we parted with following the Asain tsunami. If people feel they should give money then they will, theres lots of cash floating around in Britain.
    Bismarck may be right, that the government needs to back off and make uni seem more like a more personal business, but its worth remembering that by doing this you will be taking a lot of cash from universities, than many of them depend upon.
    I certainly can't see university of Luton alumni contributing £20million every year thats for sure!

    Perhaps universities need to start reaching out to their alumni more? TV campaigns etc. We need to encourage some kind of culture where people feel it is right to help out their old university... I know that neither of my parents have helped out their previous universities!

    There is a notion that once youve finished university its finished, and you move on to the next step in life. People also feel perhaps that by paying tuition fees they are already doing their bit...
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    I have heard stories like these concenring UK universities quite a few times now...
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    (Original post by Bismarck)
    Harvard has a $20 billion trust thanks to alumni contributions. These kind of contributions allows American colleges to expand, hire the best professors in the world, and remain free from government inteference.
    I agree, that the alumni are big contributers, apparently Colorado U has seen contributions drop because of the Ward Churchill dilemna...........Which then makes me wonder why 90% of the college/university professors are left wing liberals, which implies that the donators are lefties. Is there a contraciction here?

    A slight tangent.
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    (Original post by Ferret_messiah)
    Are you suggsting UK studen ts would feel more attachment to their universities if they were paying ten times as much to attend rather than having costs covered by the government? Because y'know, if my degree had a similar price tag to the kind top American universities have, attached isn't quite the word I'd use to describe my feelings on the matter.
    American universities give scholarships, which drastically reduce the cost of tuition. This is another reason why students would feel attached to the university.

    (Original post by Douglas)
    I agree, that the alumni are big contributers, apparently Colorado U has seen contributions drop because of the Ward Churchill dilemna...........Which then makes me wonder why 90% of the college/university professors are left wing liberals, which implies that the donators are lefties. Is there a contraciction here?

    A slight tangent.
    The average student is not going to be as extreme as the average professor. Just because this idiot taught a lot of classes, doesn't mean that all of his students bought his BS. Furthermore, most professors in that university condemned his views.

    Plus if you watched O'Reilly a few days ago, you'd know that year-to-year contributions to Colorado U have actually increased.
 
 
 
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