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    (Original post by imasillynarb)
    Uhmmm, overhand pull ups don't work your pecs mate, they work predominantly exactly the same muscles as underhand grip, a slighter greater emphasis is put on the biceps with underhand grip however.

    I'd stick to what they want you to do in the test as to which ones to do, if its underarm, do underarm, its overarm, do overarm.
    Admittedly they don't predominantly work your pecs, but I'm sure you'll agree that *any* arm/shoulder exercise has an effect an all associated muscle groups (including the abs).
    If an overhand grasp heave is done correctly, from a fully extended arm, to sternum level with the bar, the latter part of the exercise is working the pecs in a similar way that the push phase of swimming freestyle does.

    I do however agree wholeheartedly with your advice to stick to the exercises required in the test.
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    I'm assuming here that the RAF don't need to do heaves? Unless it's for the pre-IOT fitness or something?
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    There is currently no requirement to do heaves in the OASC fitness test. Just bleep test, push ups and sit ups as in the FAQ.
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    (Original post by KSpin)
    I'm assuming here that the RAF don't need to do heaves? Unless it's for the pre-IOT fitness or something?
    Sorry, I didn't realise this was aimed solely at RAF fitness. I don't profess to know what the requirements are for all branches of all services, and I was merely basing any info on what I know from the Army and 10 years of racing and coaching triathlons.

    I'm not aware of any of the Services having heaves as a pre-entry requirement, but I'm pretty sure they'll be present in PT sessions, regardless of Service.

    Each service is different and I can only advise that any exercise programs are adjusted according to requirement, fitness, build and gender.
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    RMC does, or at least did a few years ago. I imagine it wouldn't have changed too much.

    There is no harm in getting yourself fit above and beyond what is required for a fitness test however.
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    (Original post by BlackHawk)
    RMC does, or at least did a few years ago. I imagine it wouldn't have changed too much...
    Yeah, fair one. I forgot about the Booties
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    They used to do an impromptu one in the AFCO if someone came in looking for careers advice.

    AFCO Staff: 'How many heaves can you do?'
    Skinny bloke: '15 Sir.'
    AFCO Staff: Right, get up there and prove it.'

    Sadly health and safety have done away with this interesting practice.
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    lol... funny.
    Maybe now it should be:

    AFCO Staff: 'How many heaves can you do?'

    Skinny bloke: '15 Sir.'

    AFCO Staff: Right, I'll carry out a full risk assessment, and then if you wish to utilise this bar to prove it, you may do so, but first I'd like you to sign this disclaimer to exhonerate the MoD of all blame as we no longer are covered by crown immunity...

    ...Where'd he go?'
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    Yeah, I wasn't assuming this was solely for the RAF, I was just asking about one branch. I know that the normal selection for the Army involves having to do heaves, along with other strength tests. (I went through them...)
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    It would seem I'm a little out of date... it's a LONG time sice I did the Army entrance test physical.
    I'm sure this link has been posted before, but it won't hurt to stick it on here again.

    http://www.armyfitness.mod.uk/fitness_test.htm
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    Thanks for the advice everyone - heaves aren't in the fitness test but I thought that it's always a good thing to be able to do. Plus I get so bored doing strength building exercises that it's just something else to give me some variety.

    If anyone's interested, argos do a pretty good set of fitness equipment (push up stands, sit up grip thing and pull-up bar):

    http://www.argos.co.uk/static/Produc...er/3026191.htm

    cheap(ish), cheerful and does the job.(and just so everyone knows - I'm not in the Argos marketing department! it's just whenever I search for something, argos always seems to come near the top of the page!)
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    Hey, what can you tell me is a good way to get up to the standard to even start the marine commando fitness plan level of fitness? I managed all the running but only managed 27 of the situps and only five of these fist level pressups. Is this a problem and am i lucky to get up there as I think I could well do it. I don't plan to become a marine commando (though I wouldnt turn down such an opportunity) but I want the fitness and to become an officer in 5 years.
    PM me if you can.
    cheers guys, david
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    Hi Everyone, I've got a gym session booked for Friday to get a program sorted to prepare for IOT.

    I know the basics I need - 3 miles in 24 minutes (preferably less), 1.5 miles in around 10.5 minutes (a little more or less depending on what I'm capable of), a decent MSFT score and maximum press-ups and sit-ups in one minute. Is there anything else I should tell the trainer I'm going to need to improve?

    Also, do they do much swimming at IOT - I can swim OK but my front crawl is absolutely lousy - is it worth booking a few swimming lessons?

    Thanks

    Daibhidh all i can suggest is that you get to a gym and get a fitness instructor to prepare a program for you - they'll know how to help you improve everything from press-ups to a bleep test result
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    That sounds alright to me, Gemma. Just remember to tell them the timescale you need to achieve it by, in fact, bring it in a month or 2 if you can because then you can build on that level of fitness easily and go into IOT with a level of fitness that is over and above that required.

    Do loads of CV work, obviously - running, bikes, X-trainer's are good and rowing, but don't rely on the treadmill for all your running - you need to get out on the tarmac and x-country and get your legs properly conditioned for it - the gym won't help you with that, so you need to be committed.

    As for swimming, as long as you're confident in the water you shouldn't go wrong - don't go heavy on the lessons it'll be a waste of dosh, just have 3 or 4 hour-long sessions a week and that should see you through, front crawl should come naturally.

    If they do Circuit Training sessions (my local gym runs 2 a week, although i make it to 1) do them - this is the sort of thing you'll be doing in the gym at Cranwell, i'd imagine and it's all maximal stuff - these, coupled with strength work on the gym equipment should have you pushing out the sit-ups/press-ups no problem.

    Also, if you feel that you're not getting what you want out of the gym staff, TELL THEM ! They will adjust their ways and as the customer that pays them good money, they should be committed to giving you what you want / need.

    GOOD LUCK !
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    Cheers Rizza. I'm planning to take all the fitness bumph OASC have given me when I go and get the program sorted. I think it's going to have to be x-trainers, bikes and swimming anyway for a few weeks as the splints have reared their ugly head again.

    CV, stretching and a weights program should do nicely then - I can't go to any of the classes but I'm sure I can get a pt to do a circuits session with me once or twice a week (free pt at the gym I go to )

    Thanks again
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    Shinsplints sound like a nightmare. You're right, probably best not to risk them, there's a thread in MFAT dedicated to treating them, don't know if you've seen it already but if not, it might be worth a look.

    X-trainers are superb, by the way, i didn't enjoy them at first and always worried that they didn't look 'manly' enough (!!) but they are excellent for developing muscle and power in the legs.

    I'd suggest you do a gluteal/thigh/calf program - your gym staff will explain this.
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    Will do - also, Que? posted some good advice too relating to 'calf strengthening', think I'll have a good look at that again.
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    Cross training is a great way to improve all round fitness.
    Combining running, swimming, and cycling, with weights, circuit trainingetc..
    I have been doing martial arts for a while now, and since starting, I don't think I've ever had such a high level of fitness. I would recommend it to anyone!
    If there is a local taekwondo club near to you, I would really recommend going. Not only does it improve fitness, but flexibility - less succeptable to injury, and strengthens almost every part of you're body!
    Its a great way to meet new people too!

    If you have a length of rope, try some skipping, start off maybe doing three sets of two minutes at an easy pace, then gradually increase it as you feel necessary to. It's a great way to improve fitness, and also footwork if you do start/do martial arts.

    Not sure if it has been mentioned or not, but try FARTLEK training. I think it has Swedish origins, and translates roughly as 'speed play'. eg run as fast as you can for 40secs, jog for 10secs, run again for 40secs, jog for 10, and continue the pattern.
    Adjust timings to suit your level of fitness. Or use street lights. Maybe sprint 5, then jog 1, etc...
    If you're running three times a week, do this for one of them instead. This is good as it gets your body used to working at high rates, unlike jogging at an easy an pace for x amount of miles. I also find this thouroughly enjoyable. But be honest and mature about it, don't sprint too far so you are on the verge of collapsing, but on the otherside, dont give up when you break into a small sweat hehe.

    Simple things too, like instead of using a lift, walk the stairs. Instead of driving all the way into town or wherever you may be going, park maybe in a car park half a mile from there and walk the rest, or walk all of the way (weather and distance permitting hehe)

    This is just what I found useful, and do for fun anyway, so if anyone has any comments about health risks etc.. that my regime may cause feel free to say, as I don't want anyone becoming injured by something I may have left out or put in to the information above. But as with anything, make sure you enjoy it, and set yourself goals, as this will keep you motivated!! If you become bored of running for a while go swimming instead. And try and vary your routes as running past the same garden knomes does get a bit boring after a while haha.

    Anyway, I feel I've gone on a bit too much again!!

    All the best
    James
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    (Original post by b16a2)
    If you have a length of rope, try some skipping, start off maybe doing three sets of two minutes at an easy pace, then gradually increase it as you feel necessary to. It's a great way to improve fitness, and also footwork if you do start/do martial arts.
    Hi James,

    Great advice and I'll put it all to use. However skipping in kickboxing classes is what's caused the shin splints. I can run and walk fine, but if I start skipping for even 30 seconds or so my shins kill. I started wearing trainers for it instead of bare feet like everyone else in the class but it just doesn't help. Martial arts is great for fitness though - I was doing 5 hours a week for about 4 months but have quit recently because I need to spend my time (and money) on going to the gym and training specifically for IOT. The instructor never warmed us up properly and I've had enough - the instructor in my previous club (I've been doing it about 3 years) warmed us up everytime and I never had a problem. Just goes to show how important warming up is!
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    Sorry to hear about the shin splints, never thought about skipping causing shin splints! I had an idea pop into my head, have you tried using those small gym trampolines, not the huge 10ft ones, but the small 2-3ft, or so ones? Might take some of the stress off of the lower limbs? I would have got one, but knowing my luck I would probably end up injuring myself by bouncing through my greenhouse or something (i have a habit of getting injuries from trampolines hehe)

    Yeh warming up shouldn't be overlooked, forgot to put that in, thanks for putting that in Gemma! Only the other day I was practicing high kicks, and thought I had warmed up sufficiently, but due to it being much cooler now, my leg muscles disagreed! So yeh, make sure you warm up and stretch out poperly. There are probably sites on the internet about stretching, I would put in some pointers, but don't want to describe something badly and cause someone a great deal of pain! That sounds very unprofessional of the instructor, they should have known better! Don't blame you for not going back to their class!

    James
 
 
 
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