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    For any of the girls out there, I had a discussion with my personal trainer about full press-ups and if they're damaging to womens hips. Apparantly not, and it'll take the pressure off your knees. In my gym sessions I do them with my feet raised above my head on one of those stability balls - really helps to improve them. However build up to this - I'm lucky cause press-ups are kind of my thing and I don't find that method too difficult, sit-ups on the other hand...... hate the things
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    I personally found that press ups are alot to do with technique... can't say they are my strong point anyway (GemmaLS - am opposite to you - sit ups... rock and roll, press ups... yeah right!) but have been practicing in the 'male format' if you like. When I got told that I would have to do them with my hands on a bench (about a foot off the ground), and my sternum had to touch it, thought they would be easier. I actually found them a lot harder to start with as instead of pressing up vertically off the bench, I tried to press up at a funny angle off the bench. I think the point I'm trying to make (?) is that remember your technique and it makes life a bit easier (can actually do more this way now I've got the position right than when I was doing the mens version).

    Sorry about my randomness...!
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    The bench for the girly press ups is 24 inches (just under 61cm for you youngsters) off the ground. The female RAF officer supervising us was very strict about the fact that your sternum had to touch the bench and deducted some attempts from some of our group (also had no sense of humour when she was asked if chest meant 'chest' (an advantage to the bigger chested girls out there) or sternum.) She deducted sit ups from people for failing to bring your elbows at least 4 inches beyond your knees.
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    Thanks lifepak, good to actual height of bench... Prior Preperation and Planning Prevents P**s Poor Performance and all that...

    Figured they're going to be strict so not going to take any chances...

    L
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    I found that my hands slipped out quite a bit when doing the press ups because I was sweating from the shuttle runs. The PTI gave me one warning then stopped me, (fortunatly I had done enough press ups to pass) but I couldn't stop my hands from slipping.
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    It seems that all of the boards that you guys did were a fair bit more stringent than mine.
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    (Original post by LouE3D)
    When I got told that I would have to do them with my hands on a bench (about a foot off the ground), and my sternum had to touch it, thought they would be easier. I actually found them a lot harder to start with as instead of pressing up vertically off the bench, I tried to press up at a funny angle off the bench.
    I've found out why this is the case - the 'incline' press-ups done by women at OASC work the lower pectorials more than regular ones do. Therefore if you haven't previously worked these muscles - you may find it difficult at OASC:

    http://www.abcbodybuilding.com/exerc...inepushups.htm
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    i'm going to the RCB briefing next feb and on the info about it it says you'll have to run 500 m, what do you think is a good time to do this in :questionm - I'm a girl but don't want to be trailing behind the men !!!! how many pull ups will i have to do because i realy struggle with these :eek: lol!
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    Under 1 minute 20 Seconds for the run, see this website for more detail:

    http://command.dwakn.com/archives/2004_02.php the entry from February 18, 2004

    EDIT: this guy apparantly did it in around that time too http://emanation.pwp.blueyonder.co.u..._01_index.html
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    (Original post by GemmaLS)
    I've found out why this is the case - the 'incline' press-ups done by women at OASC work the lower pectorials more than regular ones do. Therefore if you haven't previously worked these muscles - you may find it difficult at OASC:

    http://www.abcbodybuilding.com/exerc...inepushups.htm
    Ahh! I see... I did find that once I'd practiced the new style a couple of times, I was fine... no problems at OASC and, if I get offered place on IOT, plan to increase amount done by at least 10... once you start achieving with your fitness (even if its only little), you want to keep on improving! It's great!
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    Does anyone know what kind of strength training is done during the BIM on IOT? I've seen pictures of people lifting weights but pictures can be misleading.

    Are we talking just your basic push-ups, sit-ups, pull-ups etc. Or sessions using free weights/weights machines etc.
    • CV Helper
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    CV Helper
    We never went near machines or free weights; HSAW means you need about thirty hour-long briefs before you can use kit.

    Generally, you'll do circuits (queue lots of situps, pressups, etc), pool circuits (awesome; pool split in thirds, different circuit-style exercises in each bit), and runs outdoors split with pressups and the suchlike.
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    Thanks nothing specific I need to practise then. Just running and lots of circuits etc
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    Thats the type of stuff I've been doing with Brit mil fitness(linked on first page of the thread). Alot of Circuits and running in that.
    Running im fine with, mostly, the circuits kill me at the moment
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    (Original post by GemmaLS)
    Thanks nothing specific I need to practise then. Just running and lots of circuits etc
    Apologies if you're a runner, I wanted to add some advice to those who might be newer to running and are thinking about jumping straight into it!

    Really, I think you just need to lift your fitness without getting injured! That sounds easier than it actually is. It'll be tempting to throw yourself into it over the next few weeks/months and pick up a strain or other injury that'll niggle you when you get to IOT.

    I would suggest having a look at the RunnersWorld website - particularly the 10K training programs. If you started now, you could fit a 10K race in during March to see how you're progressing, and still have time to lift your performance for starting in May.

    Running regularly means *lots* of variety. Different paces, different surfaces - get *off* the road/pavement and onto the grass at every single opportunity. If you can't run (muscle soreness etc) - hit the gym and head for the x-trainer - they work wonders.

    If I could make one key recommendation to *anyone* trying to lift their fitness, it would be to buy or borrow a Heart Rate Monitor. A lot of the CV machines at the gym will recognise the signal from the chest strap, and a HRM is invaluable for setting appropriate paces when out running. Those who are used to distance running use other indicators (breathing rate vs footstrike etc) to judge pace, but a HRM really is a fantastic tool.

    Returning to training from injury recently I trained to increase CV whilst avoiding injury recurrence. I spent an hour a day on the x-trainer for two weeks, working towards the upper limit of my CV training zone. In two weeks I lifted my beep test score from mid 9's to 10.7 (I'm 35). I hope to score a lot better than that eventually, but as I'm more of a distance (1/2 to Full Marathon) runner, I was actually pretty pleased with the improvement.

    Having said that, I've just had two weeks off myself. Time to dig out the gym-kit tomorrow, and work of some of that holiday flab!!
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    May I ask if the army briefing, not the mainboard, it is just required to do the bleep test and roughly what level will they stop the test at once everyone has gotten past 10.2?
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    I can also vouch for heart rate monitors. I used to borrow a polar chest strap from the gym, I now have my own as they are so useful; especially as running machines feel 'easier' than running on the road, i can push myself more (I don't own the watch as I don't like road running so much).
    You can buy just the chest strap online from interpsort/argos for about £20. They work with pretty much all cardiovascular gym equipment.
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    (Original post by Huxley)
    Apologies if you're a runner, I wanted to add some advice to those who might be newer to running and are thinking about jumping straight into it!

    Really, I think you just need to lift your fitness without getting injured! That sounds easier than it actually is. It'll be tempting to throw yourself into it over the next few weeks/months and pick up a strain or other injury that'll niggle you when you get to IOT.

    I would suggest having a look at the RunnersWorld website - particularly the 10K training programs. If you started now, you could fit a 10K race in during March to see how you're progressing, and still have time to lift your performance for starting in May.

    Running regularly means *lots* of variety. Different paces, different surfaces - get *off* the road/pavement and onto the grass at every single opportunity. If you can't run (muscle soreness etc) - hit the gym and head for the x-trainer - they work wonders.

    If I could make one key recommendation to *anyone* trying to lift their fitness, it would be to buy or borrow a Heart Rate Monitor. A lot of the CV machines at the gym will recognise the signal from the chest strap, and a HRM is invaluable for setting appropriate paces when out running. Those who are used to distance running use other indicators (breathing rate vs footstrike etc) to judge pace, but a HRM really is a fantastic tool.

    Returning to training from injury recently I trained to increase CV whilst avoiding injury recurrence. I spent an hour a day on the x-trainer for two weeks, working towards the upper limit of my CV training zone. In two weeks I lifted my beep test score from mid 9's to 10.7 (I'm 35). I hope to score a lot better than that eventually, but as I'm more of a distance (1/2 to Full Marathon) runner, I was actually pretty pleased with the improvement.

    Having said that, I've just had two weeks off myself. Time to dig out the gym-kit tomorrow, and work of some of that holiday flab!!
    Very useful post... has made me think more about how to train, am used to just going out & timing how long it takes... have rough idea about how fast I am running each mile on average but have something to work out whilst actually out there will no doubt improve my performance.

    Nice one!
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    (Original post by LouE3D)
    Very useful post... has made me think more about how to train, am used to just going out & timing how long it takes... have rough idea about how fast I am running each mile on average but have something to work out whilst actually out there will no doubt improve my performance.
    Hi LouE3D. The problem with any kind of running that is mostly repetitive is that injuries can creep up on you and kick you in the end. Say for instance that you head out on the same 3 mile loop every morning. Some days you'll run well, some days you'll struggle - the days you struggle will make it hard to stay motivated. Also, because you'll be running at pretty much the same pace all the time, your limbs will be moving through a similar arc, you'll probably run on the same side of the road, with the same camber, etc etc. It will all add up to a loss of enjoyment and focus - or injury - in the end!!

    Of course, some people just love running, and can't do without their daily fix. These kindof people run well almost all the time, and don't get hindered by niggly injuries etc.

    The rest of us need lots of variety. I usually plan in a Long Run on a Sunday (long and slow - shooting the breeze, observing the world in all its glory). Monday is a rest day. Tuesday I'll do a speed session on the track - 800m efforts etc. Wednesday I'll do a mid-week long run - shorter, but 30-40 secs or so per mile faster than the Sunday run. Thursday, maybe a Tempo run, or a Fartlek. Whatever I manage, it'll be lots of paces, lots of surfaces. The variety keeps it interesting.

    One of the secrets is to have a plan for the week, but actually run for how you feel on the day. Some days you just won't feel like the mid-week long run, but you'll manage intervals better that day. Train for how you feel - it's important.

    Finally, get used to checking your resting heart rate as soon as you wake up in the morning. You'll find that as you get fitter, your resting heart rate will fall. Eventually, it will stabilise at what is generally normal for you. One morning you'll wake up and your RHR will be up by more than 5 beats a minute - that's an indicator that you're either sickening for something, or training too hard - time to back off and take it easy for a few days.

    Out of interest, my usual RHR is 52bpm - I believe that's actually quite low. I get it down to about 49 in the weeks leading up to a marathon, but 52 is pretty consistent almost all of the time. If my RHR in the morning is more than 57 I don't run that day. Of course, in a formal training course you won't get that option, but you'll at least know you're going to feel lousy, and might be able to speak to your PTI about it.

    Hope that's of some help?
    • CV Helper
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    CV Helper
    Stop concentrating on running fitness!!!

    A decent degree of "running fitness" is worthwhile at IOT, but it's not the be-all and end-all. Success at IOT does not mean getting the PTIs to worship you!

    What you want to concentrate on is overall fitness. People get so hung up on the bleep test and 1.5 mile runs that they forget that these are only methods to sort you out on arrival; 99% of your fitness is all-over body stuff once you're on the course.

    My roommate in No 1 was a bit of a racing snake. Always used to beat me by 5-6 shuttles on the beep test. But, hang two jetpacks, a rifle and a set of webbing off me, then get me to carry a log, and I could still run to a good percentage of my maximum pace. He couldn't; his little racing snake body collapsed when you piled some weight on it.

    The bits of IOT that really test you are things like FLC, or whatever it's called now. That's 40k a day, at a constant 6km/h pace, carrying jetpacks, webbing, a rifle, and whatever kit the lead requires, up hills. It is not the streaming run.

    I'm sorry to keep saying it, but the chaps who could run a marathon on arrival at IOT were not the ones who did well. Yes, you can get the PTIs to pat you on the back constantly, but it looks a lot better on your reports if you're the guy on every lead's split team, happy to run in kit and boots all day long and push yourself for your flight.
 
 
 
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