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    (Original post by InaSpin)
    They need to invent beginners gyms and seasoned gym goers gyms. It really irritates me when I go and can't get on a treadmill because there are 6 people taking up 6 treadmills walking on them because they are too unfit/large to run. Or people who don't understand the sharing system on weights who sit there inbetween sets or who just clog up the weights area in general. It wrecks my workout when I go to the gym and can't use it freely!
    (Original post by InaSpin)
    Beginners...get some fitness up! Walk outside it's far better for you!
    Seriously though, they do need a gym geared towards beginners - simple treadmills, saving all the gucci programmable ones for the experts
    Perhaps the most exceptionally arrogant and unpleasant post I've read in a long time! Have you seen Dodgeball?

    You strike me as one of these people who make gyms fairly unpleasant for new visitors. Gyms are there to increase someone's fitness; if you're very fit, perhaps your muscles would stand up to a bit of road running better than a beginner? Perhaps you'd put up with the looks from the general public better than a sweaty, overweight beginner? Perhaps it's you who should go and do some running outside rather than them?

    If you're that desperate for a personal treadmill, buy one. Otherwise, pay a subscription to a decent gym and hope that there aren't too many unfit people trying to improve themselves there....

    A lot of programmable fitness kit is necessary for people starting out. A lot of it is required for people getting over injuries. The fit people; your so-called "experts;" are the people who don't need things like this. Look at my other half; she's had multiple stress fractures in her feet and other lower-limb injuries and needs assistance from a personal trainer. She can't crack 12mph on a treadmill, she needs to work gently in very controlled conditions being watched over by professionals. Same as people who are overweight; people who are starting exercise for the first time (consult a GP before starting and only conduct exercise under the watchful eyes of professionals; I'm sure every bit of CV kit carries a similar warning!).

    Trying to intimate that gyms are there for the benefit of fit people getting fitter isn't terribly fair. As I've said, if you're already that fit, you probably don't need a gym.

    Maybe a little beyond the mark there?
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    (Original post by Daibhidh)
    Yes, but the thing is that is ALL you need for the pre, one bleep test to a high level, pressups, situps, strength and general fitness are for the main board. I see yuor point and agree so much but it is still a game of numbers at the selection stage.
    No it's not; 99% of the numbers involved at selection are to do with your ability and potential as an officer, not your running. Your MSFT is not the most important thing during selection; the only reason it's pass/fail now is to decrease the number of applicants (I believe!), as you can always get fitter before IOT.

    Just pass the MSFT and you're ok. You need to pass the rest of selection well. And when it comes to the fitness requirements for IOT, attempts to ace the "graded" tests like the MSFT and the streaming run will not help you later.
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    Good point. but, the RAF are looking for higher fitnees levels, and that could swing their decision!
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    I agree that they want the all round package but the fitness is the big tomato they want you to pass/FAIL AND ITS THE MAIN OBSTACLE IN MY OPINION. bUT IF APPARENTLY THE msft IS EASY ENOUGH TO GET UP TO, ESPESH as I train most days I can see that is not the most important thing. I'll keep wotrking everything and try to gain weight and see how that goes.
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    (Original post by Daibhidh)
    I agree that they want the all round package but the fitness is the big tomato they want you to pass/FAIL AND ITS THE MAIN OBSTACLE IN MY OPINION. bUT IF APPARENTLY THE msft IS EASY ENOUGH TO GET UP TO, ESPESH as I train most days I can see that is not the most important thing. I'll keep wotrking everything and try to gain weight and see how that goes.
    Fitness is important, no doubt about it, just dont forget it is only one part of the overall selection process and that you should be prepared for the interview, aptitude test, the hanger excersises as well
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    (Original post by Scotsman88)
    Good point. but, the RAF are looking for higher fitnees levels, and that could swing their decision!
    As Wzz and I have tried to explain, that is not necessarily true. Take it from Wzz, he used to work in recruitment! The fitness test is a relativly new concept and only this year has it become pass/fail. Yes the RAF are looking for fitness, but more so they are looking for commitment. If someone were average but had the commitment then they may have the perseverence to continue with their fitness up to the level required for the pre IOT fitness test. The reason why the pass/fail system has been brought in is to downgrade the number of applicants. The RAF are not necessarily looking for better fitness in their candidates. As it stands if you fail the fitness test you will be sent home, no ifs or buts about it. In todays recruitment climate every point you can get does count, but it used to be the case that if you were outstanding in other areas they were willing to forgive an average fitness score.
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    Ok I've got the commitment so I will try my best. Even read the newspapers at school more often, at the end of the day they must just get chucked.
    Cool.
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    (Original post by Wzz)
    My roommate in No 1 was a bit of a racing snake. Always used to beat me by 5-6 shuttles on the beep test. But, hang two jetpacks, a rifle and a set of webbing off me, then get me to carry a log, and I could still run to a good percentage of my maximum pace. He couldn't; his little racing snake body collapsed when you piled some weight on it.
    True, but I personally always train for what I am most likely to be faced with. If I was facing a bleep test then I'd train mostly for that sort of situation. Currently my greatest need is to train for the CFT so every 2 weeks I'll do a CFT with one of the guys in my unit. I also go for a run whenever I have the free time, much the same as press ups and sit ups just to keep me occupied
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    (Original post by Wzz)
    Perhaps the most exceptionally arrogant and unpleasant post I've read in a long time! Have you seen Dodgeball?

    You strike me as one of these people who make gyms fairly unpleasant for new visitors. Gyms are there to increase someone's fitness; if you're very fit, perhaps your muscles would stand up to a bit of road running better than a beginner? Perhaps you'd put up with the looks from the general public better than a sweaty, overweight beginner? Perhaps it's you who should go and do some running outside rather than them?

    If you're that desperate for a personal treadmill, buy one. Otherwise, pay a subscription to a decent gym and hope that there aren't too many unfit people trying to improve themselves there....

    A lot of programmable fitness kit is necessary for people starting out. A lot of it is required for people getting over injuries. The fit people; your so-called "experts;" are the people who don't need things like this. Look at my other half; she's had multiple stress fractures in her feet and other lower-limb injuries and needs assistance from a personal trainer. She can't crack 12mph on a treadmill, she needs to work gently in very controlled conditions being watched over by professionals. Same as people who are overweight; people who are starting exercise for the first time (consult a GP before starting and only conduct exercise under the watchful eyes of professionals; I'm sure every bit of CV kit carries a similar warning!).

    Trying to intimate that gyms are there for the benefit of fit people getting fitter isn't terribly fair. As I've said, if you're already that fit, you probably don't need a gym.

    Maybe a little beyond the mark there?
    Thanks Wzz,

    I should have made myself clear. I have absolutely no problem with beginners who will continue at the gym. It's those that do it for Jan and give up.
    I don't make their life difficult, I merely get annoyed when the gym is clogged up; especially when I'm on a tight schedule!
    I would run outside but after a few years of constant road running, my knees don't agree and where I live at the moment is hardly a desireable place to run at the best of times! Also I like to be able to do a mixture of weights and aerobic - I often split up so i'm continuosly changing between a part of my body for weights followed by a blast on the cardio; a workout i adapted for peak period in the gym. Often i can end up doing an hour of cardio split into smaller sessions; so kind of like interval training which works really well. I also find this keeps me warm as I sometimes find the air con cools me down too much inbetween sets if i am doing a large weights session.

    Sorry for offending - I obviously have problems getting my point across!
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    Sorry Inaspin, weather you meant it or not I found it a bit crass too given the fact that I'm a beginner who needs to use the gym with help due to medical problems.

    Thanks for clearing it up anyway
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    Perhaps the most exceptionally arrogant and unpleasant post I've read in a long time! Have you seen Dodgeball?
    LMAO
    --------------------------

    If my tuppence worth is worth anything (other than tuppence) I'll add it here.

    It would seem that from all the advice given here from some apparently knowledgeable folk that:

    1) Get a heart rate monitor

    2) Go for a run on the road or treadmill.

    3) Don't get too engrossed in running that you neglect resistive training

    4) IOT isn't all about being a racing snake in trainers - carrying a bergan of goodies is equally, if not more important in the long run.

    5) There is a minimum entry level for IOT. This is a minimum standard, not a goal. During training the PTIs will actively encourage you to get fitter... in the nicest possible ways

    6) Don't take the above as a reason not to train pre-IOT. If you turn up with a good overall state of fitness it will put you in good stead. Firstly it will show a level of commitment, and secondly, if you're fitter, your recovery time reduces therefore you can remain alert/awake after a beasting in the pool etc.

    7) Don't go overboard and injure yourself. Listen to your body. There's a distinct difference between 'tired' and 'painful'.


    I use a heart rate monitor whenever I'm out, and like 80% of people I know, I make the mistake of listening to it only when it suits me. If it says I'm working too hard but my legs feel good, then I push myself a bit harder. Similarly if I feel tired and bored, my HRM says I'm asleep, I keep plodding allong at my tired bored pace.
    The HRM is a great tool, but only if used properly.

    Personally I loathe running machines. I'm not a big fan of road-slapping either but it's much better than the mundanity of running on a revolving belt. Because of the early nights I adapt my running to incorporate as much pavement/lit areas as possible. On the few occasions I go down country lanes I wear a headtorch, but there's something eerily spooky about those dark lanes. My every footfall echoes behind me giving the impressio9n I'm being chased. Needless to say I tend to do quite good times on these runs!
    Alternatively I stick a bergan on my back, put on my boots and go cross country. The pace is slow enough to be in the fat burning zone, and also to alllow good visibility of the ground to avoid injury. It also has the benefit of resistance/weight training and conditioning the muscles for later efforts ie IOT.

    Don't know if that is of any use to anyone, or just my inane ramblings...
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    Well, as part of my new fitness routine this week I've been down to the swimming pool, on my excercise bike, and this afternoon I went running a couple of laps of the cricket pitch at my local park. Now my slight problem is I had a minor nose bleed on tuesday when I went swimming and it happened again today when I got back in after my jog. Should I be worried and do something about it or just carry on? I've done a lot of bleeding in the past due to a few bumps and cuts and a head injury, they've all healed up exceptionally well according to the doctors at the time and this bleed stopped within in a minute or so, but is there anything I would be wise to watch out for?
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    If you are training up for the armed foprces you should really make sure that you are fit and get treated immediately but if it goes away it is one less thing they can ask you about in your test medical.

    Hope that goes well.David
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    (Original post by CKinnerley)
    Well, as part of my new fitness routine this week I've been down to the swimming pool, on my excercise bike, and this afternoon I went running a couple of laps of the cricket pitch at my local park. Now my slight problem is I had a minor nose bleed on tuesday when I went swimming and it happened again today when I got back in after my jog. Should I be worried and do something about it or just carry on? I've done a lot of bleeding in the past due to a few bumps and cuts and a head injury, they've all healed up exceptionally well according to the doctors at the time and this bleed stopped within in a minute or so, but is there anything I would be wise to watch out for?
    Ask your GP. He's qualified to dish out the advice. Nobody on here is. (And if they were qualified, they'd probbly still tell you to consult your own GP).
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    (Original post by REME-Bod)
    LMAO
    Inaspin is Ben Stiller. When reading that post, all I could imagine was people shouting that slogan; "we're better than you; and we know it!" So get out of our gym, fat person; you need to get fit before we let you in!
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    meh

    sorry for offending as well blackhawk
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    To be fair Inaspin has a valid point - to a certain degree.

    **Firstly, a disclaimer. I have nothing against people using personal trainers or the medically impeded using gyms. **

    I stopped going to Gyms for several reasons last summer: partly as it was costing £30 a month; and that I can train 'Rocky-style' in my garden for free. However, whilst a member I couldn't stand the donought-munching-brigade who'd turn up and literally walk (or trot) on a running machine for 30 mins whilst listening to an Ipod - to compound matters they'd 'hog' (if you'll excuse the pun) a weights machine on the lowest setting, or no weights at all whilst rabbitting away to a mate. If you were extra lucky you'd get a peek at an ill advised, ill fitting thong :puke: Now, at first I thought 'Good on you - at least you're making an effort'. However, you'd then spy them tucking into the vending machines at the end :confused:

    I came across a similar breed of gym goer at my last place of work. Women would bing in all their gym kit and proudly proclaim that they were going to run for 45 mins later after work. But time and time again you'd see the same people tucking into crisps and cake all day long!!

    Surely such gym goers would be best advised to cut out the [email protected] all day long and then just walk to work, or around the park for an hour a day and save their £ 50 a month or whatever they signed up for?

    As I said at the start - I avoid gyms now. Infact, unless you're a body builder there's no real reason to use them at all.
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    I partly agree with you - yes you can work out and git fit at home for little or no costs. However, one reason I go to the gym is so I can eat cake, choc, etc. I am fit and healthy, it is all in proportion but perhaps those women you mention go to the gym for such reasons as opposed to getting fit for the forces??!!

    If someone has not exercised in a long time, isn't used to it, can't quite distinguish between pain and hardwork then the gym is exactly the place they should be. On the one hand, they get the correct guidance support from instructors (and other gym goers?) but those qualified can also encourage and motivate them.., something that may not be recieved if jogging alone round the town or wherever!! Gyms are social places, people are going to talk to each other... also, as for using the lower weights... what would you say if someone who had never used the gym before walked in and tried to chest press 80kg???!!! The gym is a place where support, guidance and motivation can be and WILL be given to those at Beginner, Intermeidate and Advanced levels of training!
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    If you are wanting to build muscle and get stronger, the gym is the best place to be. but, CV is better done outside, as you need to get used to running outside, like in IOT. Circuits are good to practice, as that is what you will be doing in IOT aswell!
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    peeps...

    anyone know a good stretch for MIDDLE and LOWER trapeziods???

    mine are killing me from some bad habits i developed when exercising, they're really tight and i can't find a decent stretch for them anywhere...

    bex xx
 
 
 
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