Do you want to be an academic?

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not1
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#21
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#21
(Original post by thefish_uk)
I'm still wondering whether I'd like to be an engineer or a physicist.

Engineering is probably slightly more varied with the design of different things and some hands-on stuff, I suppose it depends how you do the job?

But the main advantage of choosing to be a science researcher is I could become Dr. S. Bateman (yes, my real name has been revealed!). I don't get where these physicists get their money from, sitting in a lab all day. I guess they get sponsorship from these multinational energy companies and the like. But what about the people who like to smash things together in particle accelerators, I don't see who would want to pay them to discover new particles or make ever-more-radioactive materials with higher and higher masses.
particle physics appeals to me a lot. working at CERN or something like that would be cool, and is feasible after my year in germany as part of my IC physics masters
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Linda
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#22
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#22
(Original post by _EMMA_)
really? i wish i could be as enthusiastic as you but for the moment i'm tired of studdying or maybe just tired of IB
Yeah, really.
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not1
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#23
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#23
note: im deleting non-relevant posts to keep my thread pure
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not1
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#24
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#24
(Original post by hitchhiker_13)
aw caic, it looks like academia's going to be crowded! Bang goes my dream of a lovely, perhaps penniless, existence exposing enthusiatic students to the joys of astrophysics while simultaneously finding the unified theory along with my wonderfully dedicated and frightfully interesting colleagues.

Of course, when I win the Nobel Prize, I won't be penniless any more.
And then she woke up.
teaching doesnt appeal to me much (well, perhaps id do some uni lecturing as part of an academic position). winning a nobel doesnt much either; i just want the chance to explore my own thoughts
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What's Chico Time Precious?
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#25
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#25
i'd ideally like to work out in the field, i'd hate a desk job :mad:
perhaps find a nice little theory or unique example of something useful
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JOOLS_ROOOLS!!!
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#26
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#26
(Original post by edders)
teaching doesnt appeal to me much (well, perhaps id do some uni lecturing as part of an academic position). winning a nobel doesnt much either; i just want the chance to explore my own thoughts
edders, in your quest to be an academic, will u be studying at oxford university in order to reach this goal?
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thefish_uk
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#27
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#27
(Original post by Ollie)
why not be an doctor in engineering
Never heard of one of those. Don't you need to contribute to human knowledge to get a PhD? The maths required for engineering must be terrifying!

Doesn't this mean that people have to be researchers to get a PhD? Engineers are applied scientists, not researchers, right?
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not1
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#28
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#28
(Original post by JOOLS_ROOOLS!!!)
edders, in your quest to be an academic, will u be studying at oxford university in order to reach this goal?
maybe, we'll see how things go after imperial maskall
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Muse
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#29
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#29
(Original post by edders)
particle physics appeals to me a lot. working at CERN or something like that would be cool, and is feasible after my year in germany as part of my IC physics masters
I think nanophysics / nanotechnology is very interesting. In one book I read they were talking about developing microscopic particles having collective intelligence so they could form patterns and be used as as 'invisible camera' for the military to use to spy on people.
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thefish_uk
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#30
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#30
(Original post by edders)
particle physics appeals to me a lot. working at CERN or something like that would be cool, and is feasible after my year in germany as part of my IC physics masters
Wooooo posh.

CERN, isn't that the place in Switzerland where they're building a huge particle accelerator?

I don't really research into this, just my dad's a physics teacher and gets these magazines, and they're better than staring at the wall while eating breakfast before school.
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Nylex
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#31
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#31
(Original post by edders)
teaching doesnt appeal to me much (well, perhaps id do some uni lecturing as part of an academic position). winning a nobel doesnt much either; i just want the chance to explore my own thoughts
Same here tbh, but astrophysics for me .
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curryADD
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#32
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#32
(Original post by edders)
maybe, we'll see how things go after imperial maskall
im going to san diego university!
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Linda
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#33
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#33
(Original post by curryADD)
im going to san diego university!
pao alto (stanford) is much better
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Nylex
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#34
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#34
(Original post by thefish_uk)
Wooooo posh.

CERN, isn't that the place in Switzerland where they're building a huge particle accelerator?
Yeah, the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) is the one they're building IIRC.
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thefish_uk
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#35
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#35
(Original post by timeofyourlife)
I think nanophysics / nanotechnology is very interesting. In one book I read they were talking about developing microscopic particles having collective intelligence so they could form patterns and be used as as 'invisible camera' for the military to use to spy on people.
Now nanotechnology is good but I don't have a steady hand (deliberately stupid comment just for the hell of it).

Seems a bit far off though, the most nanotechnological stuff they do nowadays are silicon chips, right?
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not1
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#36
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#36
(Original post by thefish_uk)
Doesn't this mean that people have to be researchers to get a PhD? Engineers are applied scientists, not researchers, right?
yes you have to come up with an original thesis after 2/3 years (im not sure how long phd research lasts?) of research
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Ollie
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#37
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#37
(Original post by thefish_uk)
Never heard of one of those. Don't you need to contribute to human knowledge to get a PhD? The maths required for engineering must be terrifying!

Doesn't this mean that people have to be researchers to get a PhD? Engineers are applied scientists, not researchers, right?
several of my lecturers are doctors and i have phd students as mentors. Yes, you can deff be a doctor in engineering
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Nylex
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#38
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#38
(Original post by edders)
yes you have to come up with an original thesis after 2/3 years (im not sure how long phd research lasts?) of research
I thought PhD was for 3 years.
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not1
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#39
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#39
(Original post by timeofyourlife)
I think nanophysics / nanotechnology is very interesting. In one book I read they were talking about developing microscopic particles having collective intelligence so they could form patterns and be used as as 'invisible camera' for the military to use to spy on people.
nanotech is a very exciting area, but i wouldnt want to work on technology that could have a military application.
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thefish_uk
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#40
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#40
(Original post by Nylex)
Yeah, the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) is the one they're building IIRC.
Ah, I feel so knowledgable now.

Is physics fashionble? Any female physicists here?
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