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    (Original post by HearTheThunder)
    I provided a figure, from YOUR source.

    So we're reduced to insulting now?

    Right, if you can't debate without insulting, then I'm not continuing.

    End of debate.
    you were the one that started the insulting long ago. goodbye.
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    (Original post by HearTheThunder)
    1) Do MS degree
    2) 80% of people get a sucessful job
    3) Get a sucessful job
    4) The End

    Sorry, where's the problem?

    Dont hang with the 80% statistic. What they fail to tell you is what sector of media the 4/5 people who did a media studies degree are in.
    It could range from a menial job such as photocopying, which does not require an education let alone a degree, to a writing for the Guardian.
    I suspect the majority of the lucky 80%s employment will be concentrated in the former, due the nature of the field
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    (Original post by faithless)
    maths is incredibly easy to some people whereas they may lack the creativity to be successful on a media based course....I personally would do rubbish on a media course :p:
    Exactly, ditto. But which is the more valuable better qualification? Maths i do believe
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    (Original post by Flukey)
    is it really worht arguing over something so stupid? :rolleyes:
    i just cant believe people will even consider the notion that MS is perfect and respectable.
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    (Original post by Flukey)
    Exactly, ditto. But which is the more valuable better qualification? Maths i do believe
    It hasn't had long enough to become a respected subject though
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    (Original post by ramroff)
    i just cant believe people will even consider the notion that MS is perfect and respectable.
    Exactly, MS looks pathetic on your CV, MS degree is laughed upon. Quite frankly i would be embarassed if i went into a top notch job, and they saw i had an A level in MS.
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    (Original post by Flukey)
    Exactly, ditto. But which is the more valuable better qualification? Maths i do believe
    and this is not even a 'science' stream bias, the traditional humanities degrees like History, English and so on are still just as respected as a Maths degree.

    But not MS.
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    (Original post by faithless)
    It hasn't had long enough to become a respected subject though
    rubbish ,its had long enough to be classed as a mickey mouse subject
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    (Original post by Flukey)
    Exactly, MS looks pathetic on your CV, MS degree is laughed upon. Quite frankly i would be embarassed if i went into a top notch job, and they saw i had an A level in MS.
    Well i did MS in one year, putting that on my CV [doing it in 1 year] whilst doing maths physics psychology in 1 year will look good for me. :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by addict)
    Dont hang with the 80% statistic. What they fail to tell you is what sector of media the 4/5 people who did a media studies degree are in.
    It could range from a menial job such as photocopying, which does not require an education let alone a degree, to a writing for the Guardian.
    I suspect the majority of the lucky 80%s employment will be concentrated in the former, due the nature of the field
    what he quoted did not even say those 80% went to a successful job, all it said was a job in media, which could be anything.
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    (Original post by Flukey)
    Exactly, MS looks pathetic on your CV, MS degree is laughed upon. Quite frankly i would be embarassed if i went into a top notch job, and they saw i had an A level in MS.
    then I pity you for still caring what others may think AFTER landing the job
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    (Original post by ramroff)
    and this is not even a 'science' stream bias, the traditional humanities degrees like History, English and so on are still just as respected as a Maths degree.

    But not MS.
    Yes quite. The traditional are always better in my opinion, and are FAR more respected.
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    (Original post by Flukey)
    Exactly, MS looks pathetic on your CV, MS degree is laughed upon. Quite frankly i would be embarassed if i went into a top notch job, and they saw i had an A level in MS.
    :ditto:
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    (Original post by faithless)
    It hasn't had long enough to become a respected subject though
    Exactly. For some reason, new subjects are automatically seen as easy just because they're new whereas more traditional subjects are respected just because they've been around longer. It really is stupid.
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    (Original post by faithless)
    then I pity you for still caring what others may think AFTER landing the job
    you (or one for HTT) probably wouldn't get the top job in the first place if it was a MS degree.
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    I have a Business Studies AS.

    I'm very sorry; I was young and foolish at the time.
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    The way i see it is this. I doubt the exam boards would purposely make the syllabi for newer subjects like MS and Food Technology easier than older, more well-established, subjects without being given the order to do so from above. There is no evidence to suggest that order has been given.

    Media studies and similar subjects get called mickey mouse subjects yet the number of A grade students is lower

    If the above is true, it suggests that these subjects are equally difficult as the more well-established subjects.




    Personally i don't think A-Levels in these newer subjects are necessarily any easier than the older more established subjects. However, there is a real difference between difficulty and usefulness, both in a vocational sense and also with regards to university application. The way in which History, for example, is certainly better than Media Studies is that it is viewed by universities as a more valuable qualification. If, as many do, you view A-Levels as a stepping stone to uni, then a degree in MS is undoubtedly inferior.

    Of course if you are purely interested in the vocational side of any given qualification, then the value of the qualification is directly related to the profession you wish to enter.
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    (Original post by ramroff)
    you (or one for HTT) probably wouldn't get the top job in the first place if it was a MS degree.
    I reiterate, I'm not taking MS.

    What's your opinion on Philosophy?
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    (Original post by ramroff)
    you (or one for HTT) probably wouldn't get the top job in the first place if it was a MS degree.
    but you get my point....why be embarressed if u get the job :confused:
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    Flukey, when are you taking it up the arse from ramroff? Bloody hell; too much "brown-nosing", for my liking. It's stupefying, the prodigious lengths people go to, despite them being blatently injudiciously wrong. To quote ramroff, ":rolleyes:" :/
 
 
 

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