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    (Original post by !Laxy!)
    No, it's not. The pass rate is increasing because of the ability to retake modules as many times as you want.
    Well, yes, that's the only thing I'd say needs to be changed; scrap unlimited resits and either don't allow them at all or allow 1 per subject.
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    Don't you have to get a higher percentage to achieve the grades in most subjects now? That could be a clear indicator that A Levels are getting easier perhaps.

    However, there is the arguement that A Levels aren't getting easier, we are getting brainer :P
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    (Original post by Peacey)
    On a personal level, when I did my A-Levels (not that long ago!) there was a lot of emphasis on "retaining facts" rather than a genuine understanding of the subject - and this has shifted massively now. In terms of content, the modular nature of contemporary A-Levels means that they are broader (rather than narrower) than pre-2000 (although they are perhaps a bit too broad - sacrificing depth).
    Im sorry to say, I have to disagree with you. Having compared different Chemistry modules (CH3 pre-2000 and Module 4 post-2000), the questions on the CH3 probe deeper, particularly in questions concerning mechanisms, and experimental techniques. My overall impression was that the pre-2000 questions had more of a synoptic feel to it, whereas the post-2000 papers were very shallow; quote a definition, draw the structure of X, move on.

    In fact, why cant there be a coursework element, and three synoptic papers for all A-levels. Surely that would ensure full understanding of the topics, rather than regurgetation? I for one enjoyed the synoptic papers; you had to think on your feet, rather than aimlessly amble into a definition, and "mundane" stuff.
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    The number of exams people have to sit these days is undoubtedly greater... This can be construed as an advantage or disadvantage depending on the person. however, with this system 'hard-workers' are rewarded (which is to a large extent a v good thing). i suspect that in the past you could be a hard worker and not necessarily get top grades because you needed a greater depth of understanding, rather than the ability to recall facts or the way to answer repeated questions. Because of the effect of lots of people getting top grades we are now been taught how to pass exams!? Is that real education??
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    http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article...735660,00.html
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    (Original post by HTale)
    I know a girl who is particularly hard working. She is not that clever at all, and literally lives in the library: From 7am until 4pm (obviously with lessons in-between). If you were to have an off topic conversation about nuclear power with her, she would not have a clue. However, if Nuclear Power was on the syllabus, she would have learnt all the arguments for and against in parrot like fashion.

    A-levels are undoubtedly deep in their content, but lack the breadth that we need in this day and age. This girl is extremely hard working, has achieved AAAA at AS, and will probably achieve AAA at A-level. But, what sets her apart from a very clever student with AAA? The answer is nothing, and so my friends, there is an inflation of A grades. What happens in inflation? The commodity becomes worthless. Unfortunatley, an "A" grade at AS/A2 does not have that "wow" factor.

    So, my answer in short is that A-levels per se are not getting easier, but its the way in which the A-levels are set. Too much on one topic, and not enough topics make exams easier to predict, leaving more room for "training", and not enough room for ingenuity. So people like this girl get straight A's as a result.
    Exactly.
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    A levels as courses and contents are getting easier, definitely in some subjects. Take maths for example: now you can just learn what is essentially 5 modules instead of 6 to get your full A level. How is that not easier?
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    Of course they're getting easier. Or at least they are per se. It's just a shame that the exam boards aren't doing anything about it. Now there is no distinguishing between students, which will inevitably lead to only one thing - the universities accepting people who do not deserve to be there. Entrance to a university should be on merit, or at least "potential", but how can a university decide which of the two "AAAA" students they should accept? It seems nowadays that if you have sung in the county choir and done some extra-curricular activities you have a better chance of getting in, even if the marks you achieved were far below someone else's.
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    Of course they're getting easier!!! Compare the old O-level maths to the GCSE!! They've taken so much out of the syllabus.

    Even so, how about Maths A-level??? The change from pure to core!!! They've bloody taken out ton's from pure 1 and 2 and put them into core 3 and 4. For example p1 and p2 required you to know about revolutions, ranges and domains, that and others have been shifted to c3 and c4. MOVING AS STUFF TO A2!!!! So DON'T tell me they are getting easier!!

    How about the university requirements? There are different ways you can look at it, but entry requirements have increase, this is because more pupils are getting higher grades because A-levels are getting easier.
    Once upon a time, you could get into medicine with CCC, now you need AAB.
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    perhaps this is just some subjects, I don't know
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    or we can think to ourselves that we are getting smarter....
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    A levels are simply getting easier.
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    (Original post by Ramsy)
    A levels are simply getting easier.
    I'm glad you agree, don't know why 63% is 'NO'
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    How does anyone know whether they are easier or not, unless someone has been retaking them for like 12 years in a row, no one can compare.
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    (Original post by Kard)
    How does anyone know whether they are easier or not, unless someone has been retaking them for like 12 years in a row, no one can compare.
    what about teachers that have been teaching for years?
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    (Original post by Kard)
    How does anyone know whether they are easier or not, unless someone has been retaking them for like 12 years in a row, no one can compare.
    like I said earlier, if they're easier, than why in A-level maths have topics been moved from AS to A2???
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    (Original post by Kard)
    How does anyone know whether they are easier or not, unless someone has been retaking them for like 12 years in a row, no one can compare.
    you don't have to take the exam to know, just compare the contents
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    i dont believe that a-levels are easier but that with the increased focus on exams and passing them that students are adapting to this and therefore more able to pass.

    ps. is above an 'e' considered a pass rate ?
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    For God's sake, NO!!!!! These politicians and journalists who go on about how much easier A-levels are now have absolutely no idea what they're talking about. They haven't done A-levels recently, so how would they know if they're any easier? Exams now are different to exams in the past; not harder, not easier, just different. The pass rate and the numbers getting As are higher because students are working harder due to the increased importance of qualifications and teaching has improved.
    My point exactly!!!!!!!!!!

    :clap: :clap: :clap:
    kelly strikes again!!!
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    (Original post by gordon2002)
    Once upon a time, you could get into medicine with CCC, now you need AAB.
    poor illustration, imho.

    it's often said the increase in medicine standard requirements is due to increased popularity/wider perceived access (& the majority of schools wanting to use A2 grades as a 'filter' for standard entry!), rather than such grades in current terms being required to cope with the course.

    so it's not automatic evidence that they've become easier.. merely that more students are getting grades above CCC & more students are applying to medicine! :p:
 
 
 

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