Turn on thread page Beta
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by kellywood_5)
    Well, yes, that's the only thing I'd say needs to be changed; scrap unlimited resits and either don't allow them at all or allow 1 per subject.
    I agree - I think 1 resit per subject would bring about quite a change, (even more so if scrapped altogether) perhaps preventing the tired old 'exams ARE easier' from journalists etc who are out to sell papers. It's sad but it seems most people would prefer to see a rehash of that each year rather than something along the lines of 'congratulations to students and schools, hard work and/or talent and/or good teaching pays off with thousands getting top results' etc (obv worded a little snappier than that lol :p: ).

    I can't see that happening anytime soon though. People are always quick to criticize, slow to praise. It'd be nice to see a politician/journalist give credit to us students though. It's a little bit crushing really, to be told (in a roundabout way admittedly) by such people that two years of hard work and stressful exams actually counts for very little because they are supposedly now a walk in the park anyway, compared to the 'good old days' of yesteryear. ah well.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    A-Levels are a memory test; everything is parrot fashion and it's those with good memories that get good grades, not with 'true' intellect (I myself have found I have succeeded through memory and not intellect).

    Secondly, the mentality of re-taking is ridiculous and undermines the exams themselves. Re-taking once I can understand, if there were some extraordinary / unusual circumstances but 'having another go' purely because you didn't revise enough, felt a bit nervous or were just generally not good enough is a bit silly. The idea of an exam being the all-important, final, conclusive and intense demonstration of your ability is lost amidst this ridiculous new 'fad' of re-taking. Like I say, once is enough if at all; and yes I am slating those who get A's and re-take just to get more UMS, "good god I only got 118/120 UMS in that paper, better re-take to get the full marks" - this is stupid and undermines the system. Call me traditionalist but lets have a look at the definition of an 'exam':

    ex·am n
    1. a test designed to assess somebody’s ability in a particular subject or field

    Surely the whole idea of a 'test of ability' would suggest that re-sitting the same exam would be near fruitless; afterall, it will have taken several months for a student to have attained their level of ability, and since 'ability' is not something you can spoonfeed to a class, there is little hope of much improvement. Ah yes, I forget, A-levels are just a memory test, so those who are unhappy with their result of 118/120 can just go home, re-learn a couple more facts until they can chant it in their sleep and get those all important extra 2 UMS points.

    Meanwhile, the real world continues...
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I agree with Juxtapiper and White_redrose on resits. I know someone who resat all his AS modules in January 2005, got the same grade he did in 2004, and resat the entire AS again this summer.

    I also disagree with resits in Modern Languages, because you get people resitting their whole AS again when they have a better proficiency in the language being studied, thus as an attempt to gain more UMS.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Juxtapiped)
    A-Levels are a memory test; everything is parrot fashion and it's those with good memories that get good grades, not with 'true' intellect (I myself have found I have succeeded through memory and not intellect).

    Secondly, the mentality of re-taking is ridiculous and undermines the exams themselves. Re-taking once I can understand, if there were some extraordinary / unusual circumstances but 'having another go' purely because you didn't revise enough, felt a bit nervous or were just generally not good enough is a bit silly. The idea of an exam being the all-important, final, conclusive and intense demonstration of your ability is lost amidst this ridiculous new 'fad' of re-taking. Like I say, once is enough if at all; and yes I am slating those who get A's and re-take just to get more UMS, "good god I only got 118/120 UMS in that paper, better re-take to get the full marks" - this is stupid and undermines the system. Call me traditionalist but lets have a look at the definition of an 'exam':

    ex·am n
    1. a test designed to assess somebody’s ability in a particular subject or field

    Surely the whole idea of a 'test of ability' would suggest that re-sitting the same exam would be near fruitless; afterall, it will have taken several months for a student to have attained their level of ability, and since 'ability' is not something you can spoonfeed to a class, there is little hope of much improvement.
    Well said.

    (Original post by Juxtapiped)
    Ah yes, I forget, A-levels are just a memory test, so those who are unhappy with their result of 118/120 can just go home, re-learn a couple more facts until they can chant it in their sleep and get those all important extra 2 UMS points.

    Meanwhile, the real world continues...
    *grins* great post Juxtapiped! If I'd been a little less lazy regarding retaking at AS I think I might've been one of those people you comment on above but my natural laziness overrided my perfectionist streak lol. Looking back, I think even considering it was silly.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Juxtapiped)
    A-Levels are a memory test; everything is parrot fashion and it's those with good memories that get good grades, not with 'true' intellect (I myself have found I have succeeded through memory and not intellect).
    Disagree with that part, i'm sure this depends on the subject. I dont think A levels distinguish the students with 'true' intellect as well as they should, but parrot fashion learning wont get you far in the sciences (i've only done chemistry, physics, maths so cant comment on the arts). You cant exactly apply a theory by simply memorising the the definition.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Elles)
    poor illustration, imho.

    it's often said the increase in medicine standard requirements is due to increased popularity/wider perceived access (& the majority of schools wanting to use A2 grades as a 'filter' for standard entry!), rather than such grades in current terms being required to cope with the course.

    so it's not automatic evidence that they've become easier.. merely that more students are getting grades above CCC & more students are applying to medicine! :p:
    Popularity can only become real if the grades are met, so you are saying that because of popularity the grade requirements have gone up? Yes, it can be popular if people get the grades, so for there to be more people getting the grades, the exams must be easier

    What is popularity? How much people want to do it? Even if more people want to do it, it doesn't mean they will suceed. I know people who really want to do medicine, does that mean that the standard requirement increases? No, because how ever much they wanted to do medicine, which to me looked like they were dedicated, they still didn't manage to get the grades. Thats why there is always a handful of people who don't think exams have become easier. Perhaps its not their fault that they can't attain the grades, maybe its the teaching, but the fact is that exams have become more easier, maybe not significantly, but it has.

    But the majority of people who find A-levels easy will get the grades, not just because its becoming popular.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by gordon2002)
    or we can think to ourselves that we are getting smarter....
    We are, our educational achievement is always rising, my view is that more money is being spent on education to help us succeed, ive seen alot of changes in my college and high school regarding ICT and resources that have raised grades, so as long as they do this we can get higher grades. I disagree with this new diploma that they want to bring in, they shouldn't start changing everything around, flippin well leave us alone! Theres alot of people that fail, sorry 'deferred sucess'? or don't put any effort in at all!

    Ems x
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by silent ninja)
    Disagree with that part, i'm sure this depends on the subject. I dont think A levels distinguish the students with 'true' intellect as well as they should, but parrot fashion learning wont get you far in the sciences (i've only done chemistry, physics, maths so cant comment on the arts). You cant exactly apply a theory by simply memorising the the definition.
    True! In Art A-level you have to work your ass off painting, research and composing things which take up most of your free time, we memorise nothing but work all year round.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    The reason why the government feel that A-levels are becoming easier is because over the last few year, there has been a big decrease in the number of students taking science/modern language subjects.

    In my opinion, achieving an A grade in A-level Sociology would be much easier than achieving an A grade in A-level Maths (providing the student has a neutral-based knowledge in all subjects and is not a mathematically genius).
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by silent ninja)
    Disagree with that part, i'm sure this depends on the subject. I dont think A levels distinguish the students with 'true' intellect as well as they should, but parrot fashion learning wont get you far in the sciences (i've only done chemistry, physics, maths so cant comment on the arts). You cant exactly apply a theory by simply memorising the the definition.

    Me 2, it really does depend on the a level and exam board. 95% of AQA's exams are memory tests.

    OCR and Salters differs alot.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by nas7232)
    Me 2, it really does depend on the a level and exam board. 95% of AQA's exams are memory tests.

    OCR and Salters differs alot.
    Bloody biology edexcel exam board always have those 'suggest' questions :mad:
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    AQA, 95% memory tests? Hmm, I think not:

    Maths (AQA) - Most questions that I came across on the exams required me to apply my mathematical knowledge.

    Biology (AQA) - Yes, there were memory questions, but also describe, show, suggest and explain questions too.

    ICT (AQA) - Included a 20 mark essay question - an application question, not memory.

    Obviously, these are just some of the subjects I have taken, but other AQA exams will be formatted similarly to these.

    Where did you get the "95%" figure from?
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Cosmo)
    AQA, 95% memory tests? Hmm, I think not:

    Maths (AQA) - Most questions that I came across on the exams required me to apply my mathematical knowledge.

    Biology (AQA) - Yes, there were memory questions, but also describe, show, suggest and explain questions too.

    ICT (AQA) - Included a 20 mark essay question - an application question, not memory.

    Obviously, these are just some of the subjects I have taken, but other AQA exams will be formatted similarly to these.

    Where did you get the "95%" figure from?
    Directly from AQA via email.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Emsy)
    True! In Art A-level you have to work your ass off painting, research and composing things which take up most of your free time, we memorise nothing but work all year round.
    I did Art, which was the only subject that wasn't a memory test.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Cosmo)
    AQA, 95% memory tests? Hmm, I think not:

    Biology (AQA) - Yes, there were memory questions, but also describe, show, suggest and explain questions too.
    You mean, 'describe, show, suggest and explain' things that you'd memorised over the last 2 years?
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    OMG WHAT IDIOTS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    It doesnt matter how many times you resit. If you are not A standard you will not get an A. A resit is just testing you again at a different time to see if you can attain a higher level of ability. Perhaps make the resit your ACTUAL result but don't scrap them. People retake driving tests and other things etc.

    Grade system needs to be scrapped and the UMS is what should count. How many marks out of 600 in each and then an overall total. ie 1469/1800 Why have only 5 bands when you can have 1800 bands? Then they should make the dishing out of grades follow a normal distribution around the 300 mark with 500 nearly impossible to get and 100 extremly easy to get. Those who get 550 will then truly shine.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    It doesnt matter how many times you resit. If you are not A standard you will not get an A. A resit is just testing you again at a different time to see if you can attain a higher level of ability.
    Each time you sit an exam there's a chance you might get higher than the mean mark you'd get from sitting different tests on the same material. Surely you've had exams go bad or good for you?

    Perhaps make the resit your ACTUAL result but don't scrap them.
    That would be a step in the right direction.

    People retake driving tests and other things etc.
    Yes but they don't retake each component of them such as 'turn in the road' or 'emergency stop'.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    twisted statistics is one of the main problems. Edwina bloody Curry uses the fact that 97% of alevels taken are passes, so then she sayes that alevels are getting easier and it is an awful problem. I say that it is an awful problem if a country like ours cant get 97% of out students to take an alevel and get an E!. Anyone who is half serious about alevel will at least get C's. If their not overly bothered about education then they should at least get an E. The solution is simple, make A levels like GCSEs, increase the pass rate to a C and then also introduce an A* so that extension papers are not needed any more. The problem with extension papers is that their so hard to compare with Alevels, if they wernt there then the A* would be comparable.

    Also I agree with the earlier statement about people remember facts and not understanding them, Ive got a girl whose done Alevel chemistry with me, shes got 100% on a module and about 95% on the rest, shes easily going to get an A, however someone like me whos not the best at remembering will probably get a B. When we were in the classroom learning though, she doesnt understand anything, I was trying to teach her the reasons for things happening, but instead she just wrote what I said, and labourously learnt it, word by word. That is where alevels could be slightly reformed, more lateral thinking is needed
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    There are certainly many people getting all As in A-Level, but you don't see so many getting full UMS marks. So I agree colleges should look at uniform marks; I don't agree, however, that resits should be scrapped. An exam taking student could simply have had a bad day on the day of the exam etc. I think colleges should be able to look at all of the module results, mainly taking into account the best scores, but acknowledging that the student has had resits and the scores he/she attained. Well, at least I believe that's one solution.

    Oh, and the various and wrong ways in which people spell (esp. the word definItely) are starting to get on my nerves - not just on this thread, but others too. Meanwhile I shall go back to worrying myself sick over the evil that comes with Thursday...
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by gordon2002)
    Yes, it can be popular if people get the grades, so for there to be more people getting the grades, the exams must be easier
    seems logical, yes.

    but it's not a direct proof & it was just the ambiguity of your original phrasing & suggestion that originally CCC was an adequate academic foundation from which to study medicine, but now because exams are easier, you need AAB as an academic foundation to study medicine - that i objected to.
 
 
 

University open days

  • University of East Anglia
    UEA Mini Open Day Undergraduate
    Fri, 23 Nov '18
  • Norwich University of the Arts
    Undergraduate Open Days Undergraduate
    Fri, 23 Nov '18
  • Edge Hill University
    All Faculties Undergraduate
    Sat, 24 Nov '18
Poll
Black Friday: Yay or Nay?
Help with your A-levels

All the essentials

The adventure begins mug

Student life: what to expect

What it's really like going to uni

Rosette

Essay expert

Learn to write like a pro with our ultimate essay guide.

Uni match

Uni match

Our tool will help you find the perfect course for you

Study planner

Create a study plan

Get your head around what you need to do and when with the study planner tool.

Study planner

Resources by subject

Everything from mind maps to class notes.

Hands typing

Degrees without fees

Discover more about degree-level apprenticeships.

A student doing homework

Study tips from A* students

Students who got top grades in their A-levels share their secrets

Study help links and info

Can you help? Study help unanswered threadsRules and posting guidelines

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.