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    I agree that the material featured in the syllabuses (syllabi??) is easier than what it was.
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    (Original post by Lauren)
    I agree that the material featured in the syllabuses (syllabi??) is easier than what it was.
    i agree with you in saying that you dont have to sit there for months revising.i always leave everything till about halfway through may, then start my revision, and it always works out fine.

    i have another reason for why a levels are viewed as getting easier, to do with this whole "pass rate" thing. years ago, you didnt get uni courses such as "knitwear design" and "football studies".the subjects were all serious and academic- there were classics, law, medicine, english, sciences, maths, etc.the only people that went to uni were the intelligent elite who did get amazing results.because of the amount of idiotic subjects at uni that do not require much in the sense of brainpower, it has become acceptable to call d and e grades passes- because with these "passes", you can go and do a multitude of non- academic courses at uni- something you could never do years ago. until they get rid of all these crap subjects (which i dont think they should, i agree with many going to uni), then we will forever have to contest people who think a levels are easy.they need to do more to split up the academic subjects from the ermmm, vocational (?) subjects, which are the ones that drag down the good subjects with them.


    and teknik- it doesnt annoy you when someone makes their minds up about something without trying it out for themselves?i say that they should try sitting the exams before denouncing them as easy- i dont say they couldnt do them.
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    I can't say that I found my a levels challenging, because I didn't. Personally I believe that they should be made harder in order to seperate the brightest students from the others. Too many students are coming out with top marks when they aren't even that clever. The pass rate and the percentage of those coming out with a's is just a joke. Sorry to offend those who took media studies, but its hardly maths, is it. I went to about 25% of my psychology lessons and got a. But if I had done that with my french, I probably would have come out with a D, because french is a LOT harder. The problem with a levels is that there is so much work and not much time. If people of average intelligence put the work in, they can come out with top grades too, because its not the level of the a level that's the killer, its the workload. But if the exams were pushed up a level or so, then you could distinguish between the best and the rest. Sorry if anyone takes offence to what i've just said, but thats just what i think.
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    A Levels are easier, there is no question. (By the way, I'm an 18 year old who has just got my results).

    Here are my reasons:

    Firstly, the introduction of subjects such as psychology and law. The reason that these subjects are 'easy' is because they aren't taught at GCSE. It is therefore impossible to reach a very advanced level of study in only two years without skimming over some areas within the subject in less detail. Quite obviously, courses do not do this because it would make for a crap course, so instead as much of this 'new' subject is taught as possible within the time period, but depth is sacrificed to get a 'well-rounded' knowledge of the subject. This makes the subject easier and I think this is unarguable. As a contrast, physics is taught from year seven and so by year eleven a good basis of knowledge is already known, allowing an A level in physics to be exactly what it says on the tin: "advanced level". i.e. difficult. As another example, imagine being taught French from year three onwards; by the time you reach year seven the basics of the language are known, allowing your GCSE in French to be of an advanced level. It's just logical.

    The second reason A levels are getting easier (at the moment) is because of money. I will use mathematics as an example because it is a subject I have experience in. Five years ago my brothers' maths syllabus was split into Pure Maths 1 (P1), Pure Maths 2 (P2), Mechanics 1 (M1) and Mechanics 2 (M2). My syllabus was split into P1, P2, P3 and M1 and M2. The newest syllabus is now split into Core Maths 1 (C1), C2, C3, C4 and either Statistics 1 (S1) or M1. Now, I'm sorry, but if you have a brain you may realise that the syllabus over the years has split into a ridiculous amount of sub-rubbish. Please note that the original P1 and P2 has exactly the same stuff as all of the C's put together. But, because the syllabus is split so, the exams are easier because there's less content in each of them. This is also unarguable because I took the older syllabus and P3 was much more challenging than C4. This is evidence that maths is getting easier, not because the content has changed but because Heinemann (The textbook publisher) want to make more money and they can't do that without publishing more books, and they can't do that if the syllabus doesn't change because otherwise schools would just use old books, hence they change the syllabus ridiculously to enable them to publish the "new edition". You may say I'm accusing them of something for which I have no evidence but my above rant about the maths syllabus illustrates my point perfectly. What's the point in changing the syllabus if the content does not change?! Answer, none.

    Yes, I hate what the papers say because it does make it sound like we're not working hard and moreover, imagine how the people who have actually failed feel... these exams were meant to be "easy". The hard truth is that these exams are easier than they have been for many reasons, two of which I have highlighted. :mad:
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    Firstly, the introduction of subjects such as psychology and law. The reason that these subjects are 'easy' is because they aren't taught at GCSE.
    Actually law is taught at GCSE, I did it as part of gifted and talented programme and got an A*. A-level was easy compared to GCSE, which had massive amounts of stuff in like intestacy, marriage validity as well as core things like crime and contract. I can honestly say GCSE was harder, maybe they should swap it round.
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    (Original post by Eddie K)
    I'm sorry, but if you have a brain you may realise that the syllabus over the years has split into a ridiculous amount of sub-rubbish. Please note that the original P1 and P2 has exactly the same stuff as all of the C's put together. But, because the syllabus is split so, the exams are easier because there's less content in each of them
    yes thats a good point, alevel maths is not getting easier but it has been made more convenient which begs the question why did they change P1,2,3 to C1,2,3,4 esp since the alevel results have been consistently improving
 
 
 
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