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hyperactive thyroid + blood donation watch

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    hi

    my mum is forever telling me that she cant give blood because she has a hyperactive thyroid. i dont think this affects your ability to give blood because ive never had any of the nurses ask me about it / it wasnt on any of the checklists.

    further to that, what exactly (or roughly, your choice) is an hyperactive thyroid? what does it mean? i had a look on wikipedia but it was a bit too complex for me.

    thanks
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    Your mum is right - I don't think people with hyperthyroidism can donate blood. Having said that though, if they are not currently taking antithyroid medications, and their thyroid levels are currently within the normal range (ie euthyroid), I think they should be able to, as not technically hyperthyroid,

    Basically the thyroid gland is a gland in your neck which produces hormones which play a role in your metabolism. Hyperthyroidism means your thyroid gland is overactive - producing too many hormones and this leads to symptoms. There are a number of different reasons why this can happen.
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    (Original post by kikzen)
    hi

    my mum is forever telling me that she cant give blood because she has a hyperactive thyroid. i dont think this affects your ability to give blood because ive never had any of the nurses ask me about it / it wasnt on any of the checklists.

    further to that, what exactly (or roughly, your choice) is an hyperactive thyroid? what does it mean? i had a look on wikipedia but it was a bit too complex for me.

    thanks
    Actually your mother is wrong. So long as her hyperthroidism is controlled with drugs she CAN donate blood. Now it might be that she is simply saying its the tyroid and is infact scared, or has a different reaSON FOR NOT DONATING WHICH SHE DOESN'T WISH TO SHARE.

    [Soz slipped caps lock on by mistake]

    Anyways, as for hyperthroidism, the easiest way to explain it is that the hormones the thyroid produces act like an accelerator pedal for the body. the more you have the more your cells in your body work.
    So you get diarrheoa because your bowels work too much, you get restless, your muscles use up so much energy they get weak, and you get out of breath because your body needs more oxygen then you are used to. Your appetite goes up but at the same time you might lose weight. Your heart may beat so fast that at times that you can feel it pounding in your chest. You become intolerant of heat (you are sweating with a t-shirt when everyone else is freezing). that kind of stuff. of course there are more complex symptoms for various reasons, but thats a nice ickle summary. As for causes - there are many different ones so theres no point going into them
    but as its already diagnosed and being treated then your mum should have few of these symptoms (if anything she may go the otherway becaue of too little thyroid activity).

    HTH
    Jamie
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    thanks both of ya./

    i think she is 'euthyroid' at the moment because she said she had to take drugs in the past, but shes not on any at the moment.

    i reckon shes just scared but i dont wanna push it just in case there is a reason SHE DOESNT WANT TO SHARE :p:

    long time love is on the way to both of you
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    http://www.transfusionguidelines.org...1&topicid=1512

    you can't donate if hyperthyroid and taking medications as a result
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    My friend might have that...
    Shes really skinny because of fast metabolism and shes very hyperactive lol and speaks at the speed of light and I think clammy hands are another symptom?
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    (Original post by joyabbott)
    http://www.transfusionguidelines.org...1&topicid=1512

    you can't donate if hyperthyroid and taking medications as a result
    Hmmm. how odd. i know in the US and the WHO guidelines it says that donating whilst on thyroid medication so long as malignancy isn't suspected is fine.
    UK wants you to have stopped taking the thyroid meds for at least 2 years.
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    When I gave blood i was told not to give blood if you feel the slightest bit unwell. I get hayfever in the summer so they said unless I felt particularly well it was best not to donate in the summer. So I guess if your mum never feels well then she wouldn't want to donate anyway.
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    Yeah, it surprised me actually
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    better to be safe than sorry i suppose. its why our blood products are the safest in the world.
    now anyways...
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    (Original post by viviki)
    When I gave blood i was told not to give blood if you feel the slightest bit unwell. I get hayfever in the summer so they said unless I felt particularly well it was best not to donate in the summer. So I guess if your mum never feels well then she wouldn't want to donate anyway.
    shes fine as far as i know. shes not on the pills now (i never even knew she was on them)
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    I'm quite glad to see this topic. I am a regular blood donor, but was diagnosed with hyperthyroidism two weeks ago, I was wondering about donation.

    I think I'll just ring the NBS to be sure.

    Thanks guys
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    (Original post by Col-C)
    I'm quite glad to see this topic. I am a regular blood donor, but was diagnosed with hyperthyroidism two weeks ago, I was wondering about donation.

    I think I'll just ring the NBS to be sure.

    Thanks guys
    if you're just diagnosed then tis a definite no no.
    not sure how much tyroxine slips though the screening/seperating process, but you don't wanna stick in a bag of blood into someone with a whole shedload too much thyroxine hormone in...
 
 
 
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