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    I just want to know as i really enjoy R.E and my dad keeps on saying that people with theology/philosophy etc have no job prospects. Can someone help me!
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    Not true! You could be a monk, or a priest, or a cardinal... lol

    Well, you could teach - but it's true that job prospects are limited as it's (IMHO) frowned upon as a degree; even though degrees don't necessarily have to relate to what you want to do job-wise.

    I dunno, though, really.
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    (Original post by Clarkey_Berlin)
    Not true! You could be a monk, or a priest, or a cardinal... lol

    Well, you could teach - but it's true that job prospects are limited as it's (IMHO) frowned upon as a degree; even though degrees don't necessarily have to relate to what you want to do job-wise.

    I dunno, though, really.
    How exactly is it "frowned upon"? :rolleyes:

    It's a good traditional arts degree, and hence probably has similar job prospects as most good traditional arts degrees.

    For more specific info, try http://www.prospects.ac.uk/cms/ShowPage/Home_page/Options_with_your_subject/Your_degree_in_religious_studies _theology/Where_to_start/p!eLabcif
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    I know someone who's daughter was doing Theology and she was thinking about teaching
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    anything other than teaching
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    (Original post by Clarkey_Berlin)
    Not true! You could be a monk, or a priest, or a cardinal... lol

    Well, you could teach - but it's true that job prospects are limited as it's (IMHO) frowned upon as a degree; even though degrees don't necessarily have to relate to what you want to do job-wise.

    I dunno, though, really.
    It's not frowned on in the UK. As someone else has said, it's a good arts degree, and I remember someone in the BBC telling me they actually favoured theology (along with history) for the research skills it provided. It also involves a wide variety of disciplines: literature (I read Dostoevsky and Coleridge as part of a paper on modern theology, as well as doing close analysis of scripture), linguistics if you study a scriptural language, history, philosophy, social anthropology, sociology and psychology.

    I graduated with a degree in Theology with Education Studies, comprised of two years of theology alone and one year of combined honours. (The education component was theoretical, rather than enabling me to teach.) I now have a graduate job as a Project Management Assistant in a London council, which I secured quite quickly. My degree would also have entitled me to apply for graduate schemes in the civil service, local government, NHS and many of those available in banking and other multi-national corporations, including jobs in sales, marketing and advertising. About 60% of graduate jobs, I believe, are open to graduates of any discipline. And don't necessarily believe that business or marketing or any such degrees will put you ahead of the game: after all, how many people come out of a management degree and go straight into a job in management? There's still an element of truth to the suggestion that this country is run by people with history and classics degrees.
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    (Original post by on_hiatus)
    It's not frowned on in the UK. As someone else has said, it's a good arts degree, and I remember someone in the BBC telling me they actually favoured theology (along with history) for the research skills it provided. It also involves a wide variety of disciplines: literature (I read Dostoevsky and Coleridge as part of a paper on modern theology, as well as doing close analysis of scripture), linguistics if you study a scriptural language, history, philosophy, social anthropology, sociology and psychology.

    I graduated with a degree in Theology with Education Studies, comprised of two years of theology alone and one year of combined honours. (The education component was theoretical, rather than enabling me to teach.) I now have a graduate job as a Project Management Assistant in a London council, which I secured quite quickly. My degree would also have entitled me to apply for graduate schemes in the civil service, local government, NHS and many of those available in banking and other multi-national corporations, including jobs in sales, marketing and advertising. About 60% of graduate jobs, I believe, are open to graduates of any discipline. And don't necessarily believe that business or marketing or any such degrees will put you ahead of the game: after all, how many people come out of a management degree and go straight into a job in management? There's still an element of truth to the suggestion that this country is run by people with history and classics degrees.
    It is certainly not looked down upon as far as I know. The academic content is by all accounts just as rigorous as any other traditional humanities degrees (indeed, theology can most certainly be classified along these lines-it was being taught at cambridge before history, foreign languages, English, and any other traditional and 'respected' arts subject you care to name bar classics etc). Only a numbskull with no experience of the subject would look down upon this highly established and difficult discipline. And, by the way, I do not have a theology qualification, and I am not studying for one, so my defence of the subject is not about me trying to make myself look good.
 
 
 
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