Economics @ Oxbridge/UCL/LSE/others

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Poll: Which Economics Masters would you choose?
LSE Msc Economics (43)
37.39%
Cambridge Mphil Economics (23)
20%
Oxford Mphil Economics (20)
17.39%
Warwick Msc Economics (10)
8.7%
UCL Economics (19)
16.52%
DerMunchen
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So, several economists out there would definetly benefit from a poll on this subject and an open discussion.

So which one would you choose? :cool:
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username240699
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#2
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LSE- no bias
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Anyoneouthere?
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Lse.
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aaronc2
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Speaking to my tutor about it, it seems that the UCL course is the best regarded in academic circles, and Cambridge/Oxford in general circles.

So if you want to do a PHD its UCL>LSE>Oxbridge

And the further you get from wanting to do pure academic economics, the worse an option UCL becomes and the better Oxbridge become. So eventually, say you want to work in a US investment bank, its Oxbridge>LSE>UCL. If you're in the middle its probably LSE>Oxbridge>UCL.

But in any case the difference is marginal. Its important to go where you feel you want to.
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DerMunchen
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I talked to my tutors at York, and they suggested that the Oxbridge masters are not so technically advanced as the ones in London, so if you wish to pursue a further PHD, I totally agree with you on that level.
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astudent
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Your tutors are definitely correct. For postgrad econ LSE & UCL & to a lesser extent Oxford are the academic powerhouses of the UK. The problem with Oxford is that their BA is not rigorous enough (being a joint degree with a significant practical element) and hence their MPhil, which builds on it, inherits the same attribute.

In terms of UCL & LSE if you want to do a taught masters nothing beats LSE's MSc in Econometrics & Mathematical Economics for PHD prep worldwide.

When it comes to the PHD itself the only thing that separates them should be your academic interests matched up against your supervising academic and,of course, availability of funding.
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DerMunchen
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(Original post by astudent)
Your tutors are definitely correct. For postgrad econ LSE & UCL & to a lesser extent Oxford are the academic powerhouses of the UK. The problem with Oxford is that their BA is not rigorous enough (being a joint degree with a significant practical element) and hence their MPhil, which builds on it, inherits the same attribute.

In terms of UCL & LSE if you want to do a taught masters nothing beats LSE's MSc in Econometrics & Mathematical Economics for PHD prep worldwide.

When it comes to the PHD itself the only thing that separates them should be your academic interests matched up against your supervising academic and,of course, availability of funding.
So would you say that the postgrad at Oxbridge is less econometrics inclined than for example, LSE & UCL.? (Without any obvious bias, but I've been speaking to both sides, and both sides say their masters is more difficult than the other, isn't anyone objective here )

I'm currently choosing which masters to undertake, and one of my choosing points is the econometrics requirement :rolleyes: Don't want to do badly if the econometrics is too hard, I'm on a gap year, and I don't see myself doing econometrics after work ...
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astudent
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(Original post by DerMunchen)
So would you say that the postgrad at Oxbridge is less econometrics inclined than for example, LSE & UCL.? (Without any obvious bias, but I've been speaking to both sides, and both sides say their masters is more difficult than the other, isn't anyone objective here )

I'm currently choosing which masters to undertake, and one of my choosing points is the econometrics requirement :rolleyes: Don't want to do badly if the econometrics is too hard, I'm on a gap year, and I don't see myself doing econometrics after work ...
Looking at your post it seems your decision is very easy. If you only want to do a masters to enhance your employment prospects go for Oxford or Cambridge - this is pretty obvious. In terms of which one of these two, you have to look at the courses and find the one which you like more - e.g. the one with less metrics etc.
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ltwelv
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From the research I've done and people I've talked to they are ALL very rigorous programmes and all have a large compulsory element of econometrics. I think it's safe to say that no decent masters course in economics isn't going to be very focussed on econometrics. I think Oxbridge (Cambridge in particular as it is a 1 year course) is extremely intense as they cover A LOT of material in a short space of time. One thing to bear in mind at LSE is there is no real dissertation - just an extended essay which only counts for 50% of the optional course. This differs from UCL and Cambridge where there is a 10k word dissertation and at Oxford there is a 30k word thesis!!
As someone else mentioned I think it depends on your ambitions - if you want to do a PhD then I think Oxford is the best option because of the significant research element but it's true that anyone who is anyone in Academia knows UCL is an excellent if not the best all round one year masters course. If you want a Private sector job then Cambridge and then probably LSE make the most sense as they are one year programmes and are big names in industry. For what it's worth I believe the Oxbridge programmes are slightly more competitive in terms of admissions as they take fewer people/make fewer offers than say LSE, and pay more attention to academic specifics - i.e previous research experience and proficiency in technical subjects.
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aaronc2
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I would say that the econometrics on any of those programs is going to be very intense. I know that Cambridge pride themselves on being super-technical. Someone I was in touch with said he didn't write a single essay throughout the year.

From what I've heard, the least rigorous is probably the LSE standard MSc Economics. EME is LSE's equivalent of UCL and Cambridge's main program. Thats the reason why very few people from LSE's MSc Economics progress to PHD, even though a lot of them want to.
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astudent
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(Original post by aaronc2)
I would say that the econometrics on any of those programs is going to be very intense. I know that Cambridge pride themselves on being super-technical. Someone I was in touch with said he didn't write a single essay throughout the year.

From what I've heard, the least rigorous is probably the LSE standard MSc Economics. EME is LSE's equivalent of UCL and Cambridge's main program. Thats the reason why very few people from LSE's MSc Economics progress to PHD, even though a lot of them want to.
Please refrain from commenting when you're still doing a-levels. TSR never ceases to amaze me. Both of your posts in this topic are, to put it bluntly, rubbish.
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DerMunchen
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(Original post by aaronc2)
I would say that the econometrics on any of those programs is going to be very intense. I know that Cambridge pride themselves on being super-technical. Someone I was in touch with said he didn't write a single essay throughout the year.
:lolwut: Damn, u serious, i was missing writting essays ... im tired of numbers !!!!!
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aaronc2
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(Original post by astudent)
Please refrain from commenting when you're still doing a-levels. TSR never ceases to amaze me. Both of your posts in this topic are, to put it bluntly, rubbish.
Very kind of you to say so. I'm not still doing my A levels. I'm doing the Cambridge Mphil next year. :rolleyes:
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DerMunchen
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(Original post by astudent)
Please refrain from commenting when you're still doing a-levels. TSR never ceases to amaze me. Both of your posts in this topic are, to put it bluntly, rubbish.
We should filter anyone over 20 or post-undergrad to post here :rolleyes: we are too old for this LOL
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aaronc2
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(Original post by DerMunchen)
:lolwut: Damn, u serious, i was missing writting essays ... im tired of numbers !!!!!
In that case, have you considered The MSc Economic Policy at UCL? Its where my tutor here shepherds a lot of people who are into the qualitative side of things.
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astudent
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(Original post by aaronc2)
Very kind of you to say so. I'm not still doing my A levels. I'm doing the Cambridge Mphil next year. :rolleyes:
I see, you havent changed your profile since 2006. In either case making claims such as LSE's EME being the equivalent of an Economics Mphil at Cam or UCL's MSc is ridiculous. EME is a program aimed at serious research economists/econometricians, the level of the material covered there is much higher than any of the one year masters programs in the world.
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aaronc2
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(Original post by astudent)
I see, you havent changed your profile since 2006. In either case making claims such as LSE's EME being the equivalent of an Economics Mphil at Cam or UCL's MSc is ridiculous. EME is a program aimed at serious research economists/econometricians, the level of the material covered there is much higher than any of the one year masters programs in the world.
OK. I'm not going to get into an argument with you. I qualified my statement with 'from what I understand'. I'm sorry to have offended you...
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astudent
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No offense taken. Im simply giving the facts. Good luck at cambs next year.

PS: To my anonymous fan; a pity you do not know the difference between opinion and fact
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DerMunchen
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(Original post by aaronc2)
In that case, have you considered The MSc Economic Policy at UCL? Its where my tutor here shepherds a lot of people who are into the qualitative side of things.
I wish I could but ... I don't really want to, I wish to remain in my current field of work, and as far as my job goes, Economic Policy is a bit too qualitative for it. I just wish to hedge my risk of not getting a merit by taking a minimum of econometrics modules :rolleyes:
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DerMunchen
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(Original post by astudent)
Looking at your post it seems your decision is very easy. If you only want to do a masters to enhance your employment prospects go for Oxford or Cambridge - this is pretty obvious. In terms of which one of these two, you have to look at the courses and find the one which you like more - e.g. the one with less metrics etc.
Thanks, I look very much forward to going to Cambridge than :rolleyes:
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